What is a "Sartorialist"?

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by goodbottom, Jan 14, 2011.

  1. goodbottom

    goodbottom Member

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    What is a "Sartorialist"?
     


  2. Roger Everett

    Roger Everett Senior member

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  3. goodbottom

    goodbottom Member

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  4. Hany

    Hany Senior member

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    Look for sartorial:
    sartorial |särˈtôrēəl|
    adjective [ attrib. ]
    of or relating to tailoring, clothes, or style of dress : sartorial elegance.
    DERIVATIVES
    sartorially adverb
    ORIGIN early 19th cent.: from Latin sartor ‘tailor’ (from sarcire ‘to patch’ ) + -ial .
     


  5. goodbottom

    goodbottom Member

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    Look for sartorial:
    sartorial |särˈtôrēəl|
    adjective [ attrib. ]
    of or relating to tailoring, clothes, or style of dress : sartorial elegance.
    DERIVATIVES
    sartorially adverb
    ORIGIN early 19th cent.: from Latin sartor "˜tailor' (from sarcire "˜to patch' ) + -ial .


    Okay, so what is the difference between a "Sartorialist" and a "non-Sartorialist" when it comes to looks?
     


  6. Eustace Tilley

    Eustace Tilley Senior member

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    Who is higher up on the food chain - a Sartorialist or an iGent?

    I have personally thought of a Sartorialist as a caterpillar that blossoms into a butterfly of an iGent when it joins SF (and a moth when a Sartorialist veers towards FNB instead). Thoughts?
     


  7. FunLovinStyle

    FunLovinStyle Senior member

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  8. Saenek

    Saenek Senior member

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    Okay, so what is the difference between a "Sartorialist" and a "non-Sartorialist" when it comes to looks?

    Google is an amazing tool, use it.
     


  9. jussumguy

    jussumguy Well-Known Member

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    Okay, so what is the difference between a "Sartorialist" and a "non-Sartorialist" when it comes to looks?

    If you're talking about that Sartorialist looks thread and non-Sartorialist looks thread, I believe Sartorialist looks means something that was posted on thesartorialist.blogspot.com whereas non-Sartorialist looks refers to anything that was posted anywhere else.
     


  10. GBear

    GBear Senior member

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  11. celery

    celery Senior member

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    This is why children need to stay in school.
     


  12. Cary Grant

    Cary Grant Senior member

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  13. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I don't think I would trust a dictionary that they actually block me from at work.
     


  14. dugward

    dugward New Member

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    'Satorialist' isn't in the OED. Actually, it's not in any dictionary, because it's not a word, which makes the original question perfectly reasonable. Before Scott Schuman took it as the name for his blog, the word had been independently coined a couple of times as a humorous term for surgeons (relating to its Latin root sarcire, meaning 'to patch'). It can be found in a 1908 edition of Punch and the 1931 work A Bachelor's London.
     


  15. landshark

    landshark Senior member

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