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What is a Hacking Pocket?

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Sustanon 250, Jun 2, 2005.

  1. Sustanon 250

    Sustanon 250 Member

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    Assuming this is an elementary question - any help would be appreciated.

    Regards,

    Sustanon
     


  2. Matt

    Matt [email protected]

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    a jacket pocket at an angle like this: [​IMG] as opposed to this: [​IMG] ...images shamelessly pilfered from Darren's site....
     


  3. Sustanon 250

    Sustanon 250 Member

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    Thank you - is this acceptable for business suits? My understanding is that it has, historically, been meant only for tweed jackets and the like.

    Sustanon
     


  4. Matt

    Matt [email protected]

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    i like it and wear it happily in a business context, but it is regarded as a more casual look.
     


  5. Mike C.

    Mike C. Senior member

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    Hacking pockets only look good/appropriate on non-business fabrics, such as tweeds, cords, and heavier, coarser fabrics. On a high twist, flat wool, like serge they'll look out of place. So, I doubt you wear tweed to the office, so the question is irrelevant.
     


  6. Sustanon 250

    Sustanon 250 Member

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    (Sustanon 250 @ June 02 2005,13:16) Thank you - is this acceptable for business suits? My understanding is that it has, historically, been meant only for tweed jackets and the like. Sustanon
    Hacking pockets only look good/appropriate on non-business fabrics, such as tweeds, cords, and heavier, coarser fabrics. On a high twist, flat wool, like serge they'll look out of place. So, I doubt you wear tweed to the office, so the question is irrelevant.
    The question was not irrelevant - refer to my post if you will. Besides, the pic [email protected] has posted from Beaman's website has the hacking pocket on a business suit. Sustanon
     


  7. Mike C.

    Mike C. Senior member

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    (Mike C. @ June 02 2005,10:32)
    Thank you - is this acceptable for business suits? My understanding is that it has, historically, been meant only for tweed jackets and the like. Sustanon
    Hacking pockets only look good/appropriate on non-business fabrics, such as tweeds, cords, and heavier, coarser fabrics. On a high twist, flat wool, like serge they'll look out of place. So, I doubt you wear tweed to the office, so the question is irrelevant.
    The question was not irrelevant - refer to my post if you will. Besides, the pic [email protected] has posted from Beaman's website has the hacking pocket on a business suit. Sustanon
    I don't know what type of business in which red pinstripe suits are appropriate... bouncer, nightclub owner? Most guys on here work in conservative enviorments, so I was taking that into consideration. Either way, my point was that hacking pockets look out of place on fabrications that are typically used on "business suits." Thus you won't find many RTW suits like this.
     


  8. montecristo#4

    montecristo#4 Senior member

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    Perhaps we should consider the possibility that RTW suits don't set an especially high standard. I value the sartorial opinion of Darren Beaman, Savile Row much more highly than I value the opinion of George Zimmer, Men's Wearhouse. [​IMG]
     


  9. Manton

    Manton RINO Dubiously Honored

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    Historically, hacking pockets are not worn on business suits, but only on tweed suits and jackets.  They are considered a country, "horsey" detail.  They have become popular on business suits, however, because people (primarily Americans) think they help set their suits apart from the crowd, and also give them a more "bespoke" and/or "English" look.  A purist (I am one) would never get them on a city suit.  Tailors of course generally won't hesitate to make them -- they are after all in business to fulfill the client's wishes.
     


  10. Matt

    Matt [email protected]

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    youre kidding? [​IMG]
     


  11. trogdor

    trogdor Senior member

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    I read somewhere that they are slanted so that, when riding a horse (and leaning forward) the pocket would remain horizontal and parallel to the ground. Anyone horsey enough to verify this? Chuck?

    Perhaps when bike couriers start dressing more formally, they too will adopt a hacking pocket for similar reasons...
     


  12. Manton

    Manton RINO Dubiously Honored

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    I'm not sure the point is that they are parallel to the ground when riding, only that they are easier to access when in the saddle. I have not ridden a horse since I got my sole hacking-pocketed jacket, so I cannot confirm this.
     


  13. pejsek

    pejsek Senior member

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    Consider also that the angle of the pocket can vary. I have an old Henry Poole suit in dark blue flannel with beaded brown and electric blue stripes and very slightly angled pockets. It's certainly a bit of a country touch and gives the suit a more casual air (which is exactly the sort of thing I like). I guess I wouldn't wear it to a tax audit, but maybe that's just a California thing. I also seem to recall seeing Huntsman suits with a silhouette similar to the Darren Beaman suit pictured above. I personally don't think hacking pockets look right on too fine a fabric, but I wouldn't limit it to tweed or corduroy.
    Manton is, of course, right about the rule.
     


  14. Matt

    Matt [email protected]

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    then theyll need cuffs and pleats on the spandex shorts
     


  15. Mike C.

    Mike C. Senior member

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    I think RTW suits set a higher standard than bespoke. Bespoke gives the customer the liberty in some cases to become the fashion designer, which leads to, in most cases, disaster... just look at a few of the suits guys on here have designed for themselves, or have written about getting made. I can just picture someone with way more money than taste getting a Duponi silk suit with a hacking pockets, as well as a ticket pocket. With RTW, you have professional designers who know what looks "right;" though their designs may not suit your taste, they will, for the most part, look "right." BTW, I'm not talking about Men's Wearhouse. I'm talking about any respectable maker Barbera, Kiton, RL, Zegna, etc... Also, this doesn't include fashion; Etro, Dolce, etc....
     


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