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What does "Fully canvassed in front" mean?

Joe Esq

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Gentlemen, a question that I couldn't find a precise answer to in the threads on canvassed vs. fused suits:

I understand the difference between "fused" and "canvassed" suits generally, and I understand the term "half-canvassed" to mean that the lapels and chest are canvassed, while the body is not.

However (and this is admittedly a bit of a beginner question), I recently saw the phrase "fully canvassed in front," which made me realized I have no idea whether: (a) the BACK of a jacket is ever "canvassed," and (b) if so, whether that would really matter at all.

Thank you,

Joe
 

dah328

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The back of a jacket is never canvassed.
 

Joe Esq

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Thanks very much for the response. So when a tailor says his suits are "fully canvassed in front," that's just a slightly more specific wording, equivalent to "full canvassed."

To get slightly more detailed, do you happen to know how only canvassing the front of a suit actually works? Is the back of the suit just two layers (the wool and the lining)? Does the canvassing stop at the shoulder seam? I'd think that might be visible if the suit goes from 3 layers to two at that point...

Thanks again.
 

Sanguis Mortuum

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Originally Posted by Joe Esq
Does the canvassing stop at the shoulder seam? I'd think that might be visible if the suit goes from 3 layers to two at that point....

The canvas goes slightly past the shoulder seam but not much, it is pad-stitched to the shoulder pad which continues over the shoulder and tapers down to nothing as it goes round the back of the scye. Because it gradually tapers the line where it ends should not be visible from the outside.

Women's coats sometimes have canvas in the upper part of the back, but this is rarely used in men's coats, the back is just the two layers, fabric and lining.
 

greger

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What manufactures do I don't know nor care.

Cloth or coat means the outer cloth- what the main cloth of garment is made of. That is the cloth you see. Not the insides.

Custom/Bespoke Tailors have a number of ways to do it. The main canvas starts at the shoulder and goes to the bottom or near it, from the tip of the lapel to the about the underarm seam. On really thin cloth it should go down to the bottom and across about 4-5 inches. On a heavier cloth for sb it may go down to the first third of the sharp curve at bottom. Most tailors take it to the bottom and across 4-5 inches. It depends on how you want the cloth to handle. The shaping of the cloth with the iron and the canvas maybe ruin that pressing purpose if the canvas goes to the bottom.

Another piece of canvas goes in the chest area. This gives added support. Most tailors probably put a canvas or two in the shoulder to help give a nice clean shoulder. A piece of felt or something like that to cover these extra layers. These are pad-stitched together. The pad-stitching allows some flexibility between them. The pad-stitching creates a foundation for the coat to sit upon keeping the coat looking good for many years to come. It also prevents unwanted body shapes from showing through after a few years. The canvas is fastened along the bridle line (roll line) to the coat and down the front edge and at the armhole or top of shoulder end. Lapel part is padded to coat lapel. It is also fastened at the pocket openings. A few tailors pad-stitch the canvas to the coat, these I wouldn't call a floating canvas. But the other ones are floating. The bridle has a special "stay" tape (the best is made of linen); this is pulled tight so the coat along the roll line stays close to the chest and not gap. Sometimes a wedge cut is made there for the same reasons, which is not seen because of the facing.

From my point of view the pads are to prevent the shoulder ends from collapsing. Other reasons is sometimes bigger pads help on somebody with steep shoulders. Fashion reasons are droopy shoulders, so none or little. Or, larger pads for the same reason looks, as that is generally what fashions are about fun and looks.

The collar has a layer of canvas, which is pad-stitched to melton or felt. Sleeve heads usually do have a stripe of canvas. And some need canvas across the back just below the neck. Won't say wiggan is a canvas but that goes at the bottom of the sleeve.

So tailoring is a fine art. It is fun to do. An adventure for people new to it. In the old days when it was all hand sewing many tailors started between the ages of 2-19. Some places the cut off age for learning was 5, another guild might be 6 or 7. Believe in the 60s and 70s some schools in England the 12-13 year old boys could take part of the day learning the trade (don't think they have anything now).
 

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