What does "buggy-lined" mean?

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by BareSolid, Mar 15, 2010.

  1. BareSolid

    BareSolid Senior member

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    I've just got no idea. I'm sure I've read it somewhere before but I can't think.
     


  2. Kentishman

    Kentishman Senior member

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  3. I. Gentantithesis

    I. Gentantithesis Senior member

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    This, or this.

    I could be laboring/labouring under a misapprehension, but I think the first link exhibits a 2/3 or 3/4, whatever fraction, lining and the second link exhibits a 'butterfly' shoulder lining.

    A buggy lining has a French-faced partial front lining (the same fabric as the exterior) and a shoulder lining as that in the first link. The most common use of the term is in outerwear, most often in genuine Scottish Mackintosh long riding coats made by Traditional Weatherwear of Cumbernauld, Scotland, for instance. The back shoulder partial lining of such outerwear is usually of blanket weight wool in Tattersall or checked patterns. It can also be found in Palm Beach style (the style, not brand) odd jacket and suit linings, the 'buggy" shoulder lining being Bemberg.

    Whence the name? Dunno, but suspect horsies, sodomites or creepy-crawlies are involved.
     


  4. Kentishman

    Kentishman Senior member

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    You may well be right I. Gentantithesis. I wonder if is a term that has been misappropriated and is now used to refer to any kind of partial lining? Any kind of 1/2, 3/4 etc lining seems to be referred to as 'buggy lined', at least so far as my limited knowledge goes.

    I hope it's to do with sodomy though, that'd be great.
     


  5. the_sartorialist

    the_sartorialist Senior member

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    A buggy lining has a French-faced partial front lining (the same fabric as the exterior) and a shoulder lining as that in the first link. The most common use of the term is in outerwear, most often in genuine Scottish Mackintosh long riding coats made by Traditional Weatherwear of Cumbernauld, Scotland, for instance. The back shoulder partial lining of such outerwear is usually of blanket weight wool in Tattersall or checked patterns. It can also be found in Palm Beach style (the style, not brand) odd jacket and suit linings, the 'buggy" shoulder lining being Bemberg.

    Thanks for clarifying, I Gent. I am actually one of those who refer to it as an umbrella term for partial coverage where the lining of the jacket is concerned.

    I suppose, on a strict interpretation of your definition, the first picture in the following link should suffice as a buggy-lining?

    http://www.thelondonlounge.net/forum...t=9363&start=0
     


  6. I. Gentantithesis

    I. Gentantithesis Senior member

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    Thanks for clarifying, I Gent. I am actually one of those who refer to it as an umbrella term for partial coverage where the lining of the jacket is concerned.

    I suppose, on a strict interpretation of your definition, the first picture in the following link should suffice as a buggy-lining?

    http://www.thelondonlounge.net/forum...t=9363&start=0


    "French faced", or face, front interior with a "butterfly yoke" Bemberg shoulder lining.

    I think, strictly speaking, that "buggy" is the 1/3 - 1/2 lined back with relatively straight horizontally hemmed lining edge. Both types of shoulder linings can also be found in heavy tweed (field use) odd jackets. With the two variations of the shoulder linings this type of construction was tropically popular in the '20s along the Riviera and Palm Beach. Flusser may have remarked. In RTW, Polo and the defunct Willis & Geiger used it extensively in various weights and rustic cloths of the most casual sport coats, linen and seersucker to tweeds. Polo may still do so.
     


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