What does being gentlemanly mean to you?

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Mr. Moo, Dec 5, 2009.

  1. Shoe City Thinker

    Shoe City Thinker Senior member

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    The following has been in the sig line of my personal e-mail:

    Putting a man in an expensive bespoke suit does not make him a gentleman.
     


  2. musicguy

    musicguy Senior member

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    British, nerdy and dressed with "braces", as they call it.
     


  3. comrade

    comrade Senior member

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    Wearing spats and carrying a cane.
     


  4. Shoe City Thinker

    Shoe City Thinker Senior member

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    Clothing is only one part of a gentleman's deportment.
     


  5. JordanH.

    JordanH. Senior member

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    To me, being a gentleman means acting and dressing a certain way...
     


  6. binge

    binge Senior member

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    In before reach-arounds!
     


  7. MyOtherLife

    MyOtherLife Senior member

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    Hi Moo. My input is this...Good manners above all. Good manners in any situation short of having ones life threatened. It costs nothing to give and makes for a better day for you and everyone you've come across. Every man should own a book of etiquette, preferrable one printed in the 1960's or before, and read it and make it a daily practice. I saw a documentary recently called 'Rude', and in it, there was a woman known as 'Miss Manners'. It was sad when she stated that even in the 1950's & 60's people were rude even then, but it is far far worse today. (watch online here> http://www.cbc.ca/documentaries/doczone/2008/rude/) As we are defenders of dressing well, or even dandyism (tradional or modern) then I believe it is also a worthy cause to include good manners at all times. Etiquette should come naturally, but does require study and effort. Words like 'please' and 'thank you'. Holding a door open for a woman. Giving a seat on the bus or train to an older woman, elderly woman or pregnant woman (or even an elderly pregnant woman.... ..beat you to it..) to me, are a few important measures of gentlemanly conduct.
     


  8. teddieriley

    teddieriley Senior member

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    Keepin' it real, while keepin' it civil. Yo. And just being nice. Usually.
     


  9. apropos

    apropos Senior member

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    ok ill bite - not the way you act good sir
    +1 In fact moo, your e-identity has the mental maturity of... a cabbage perhaps. Repeatedly making fun about someone's height, and then taking serious umbrage and threatening real-life violence when someone does something similar to your wife, and then going on with some BS feel-good my daddy taught me never to compromise my vaaaaallllluuuuuueeeeess story in an attempt to justify your behaviour is BS on a plane many times removed and superior to typical SF shenanigans.
     


  10. teddieriley

    teddieriley Senior member

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    +1

    In fact moo, your e-identity has the mental maturity of... a cabbage perhaps.

    Repeatedly making fun about someone's height, and then taking serious umbrage and threatening real-life violence when someone does something similar to your wife, and then going on with some BS feel-good my daddy taught me never to compromise my vaaaaallllluuuuuueeeeess story in an attempt to justify your behaviour is BS on a plane many times removed and superior to typical SF shenanigans.


    So what do you really think?
     


  11. DocHolliday

    DocHolliday Senior member Dubiously Honored

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  12. Chips

    Chips Senior member

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  13. blackbowtie

    blackbowtie Senior member

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    Hi Moo.
    My input is this...Good manners above all.
    Good manners in any situation short of having ones life threatened.
    It costs nothing to give and makes for a better day for you and everyone you've come across.
    Every man should own a book of etiquette, preferrable one printed in the 1960's or before,
    and read it and make it a daily practice.
    I saw a documentary recently called 'Rude', and in it, there was a woman known as 'Miss Manners'.
    It was sad when she stated that even in the 1950's & 60's people were rude even then,
    but it is far far worse today.
    (watch online here> http://www.cbc.ca/documentaries/doczone/2008/rude/)
    As we are defenders of dressing well, or even dandyism (tradional or modern) then I believe it is also a worthy cause to include good manners at all times.
    Etiquette should come naturally, but does require study and effort.
    Words like 'please' and 'thank you'. Holding a door open for a woman. Giving a seat on the bus or train to an older woman, elderly woman or pregnant woman (or even an elderly pregnant woman....
    ..beat you to it..) to me, are a few important measures of gentlemanly conduct.


    Is it possible to "become" a (presumably autodidact) gentleman if one was not brought up as one?
     


  14. apropos

    apropos Senior member

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    Is it possible to "become" a (presumably autodidact) gentleman if one was not brought up as one?
    [​IMG]

    Don't see any reason why it can't work the other way.
     


  15. N.N.O.P

    N.N.O.P Well-Known Member

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    "a true gentleman is one who is never unintentionally rude" Oscar Wilde
     


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