1. And... we're back. You'll notice that all of your images are back as well, as are our beloved emoticons, including the infamous :foo: We have also worked with our server folks and developers to fix the issues that were slowing down the site.

    There is still work to be done - the images in existing sigs are not yet linked, for example, and we are working on a way to get the images to load faster - which will improve the performance of the site, especially on the pages with a ton of images, and we will continue to work diligently on that and keep you updated.

    Cheers,

    Fok on behalf of the entire Styleforum team
    Dismiss Notice

What do you have in your kitchen?

Discussion in 'Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto' started by kronik, Jan 16, 2007.

  1. kronik

    kronik Senior member

    Messages:
    3,944
    Joined:
    May 2, 2006
    Location:
    Arlington, VA
    A nine inch, a peculiar length.

    Ain't nothing peculiar about 9 inches. [​IMG]

    Sorry. I had to.
     
  2. skalogre

    skalogre Senior member

    Messages:
    6,324
    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2006
    Ain't nothing peculiar about 9 inches. [​IMG]

    Sorry. I had to.


    Fine, go ahead and make fun of us with the plebeian 8" ones!

    [​IMG]
     
  3. kronik

    kronik Senior member

    Messages:
    3,944
    Joined:
    May 2, 2006
    Location:
    Arlington, VA
    I'd be making fun of myself then, skalogre. [​IMG]
     
  4. skalogre

    skalogre Senior member

    Messages:
    6,324
    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2006
    I'd be making fun of myself then, skalogre. [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  5. globetrotter

    globetrotter Senior member

    Messages:
    20,605
    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2004
    Location:
    greater chicago
    i recently got some copper pots don't have a firm opinion on them yet, but overall positive. have a pig shaped mortar and pestle from mexico and a little clay one, want to get a flat one as well. can't remember the name of my knives, but a set of german knives - chef, veg, bread, steel. le crueset pot and dutch over type of thing. big earthenware pot from columbia. huge stockpot, cheap one, can't remember the make. two big cast iron woks.

    juicer, mixer, blender, micro/toaster
     
  6. Dmax

    Dmax Senior member

    Messages:
    1,302
    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2006
    Location:
    People's Republic of the Five Boroughs
    That website seems to be a parking lot with several links. Were you referring to a specific vendor or product?

    _______________________



    The correct address is: http://www.japanesechefsknife.com
     
  7. GQgeek

    GQgeek Senior member

    Messages:
    17,933
    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2002
    Location:
    Canuckistan
    Ain't nothing peculiar about 9 inches. [​IMG]

    Sorry. I had to.


    There is for a chinaman. [​IMG]

    Sorry. I had to.
     
  8. Stazy

    Stazy Senior member

    Messages:
    7,194
    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2006
    Location:
    Toronto
    Washing dishes is one of my most hated chores, so since moving to Finland in August, I've exclusively used disposable plates and cutlery.

    This is much to the disdain of my environmentalist roommate, but quite frankly, I don't give a damn.
     
  9. Full Canvas

    Full Canvas Senior member

    Messages:
    1,057
    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2006
    Location:
    La Jolla, Cargese, Minsk
    The correct address is: http://www.japanesechefsknife.com

    Thank you. That site is what I call true East Asian kitchen knife porn! Don't miss the naked thirty-three layer Damascus steel! [​IMG]
    _________________________
     
  10. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    14,384
    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2006
    Location:
    The wild and the pure.
    Having spent a lot of time in professional kitchens, I can only add this information about knives. All knives cut the same. The important factors when choosing a knife are the feel in your hand and the ability to cut quickly. Nobody who has not cooked professionally realizes how fast a person can and must go. There are many, many good home cooks, but they are all painfully slow. I am not nearly as fast as I once was, but I am still OK seed wise.

    In my kitchen:

    Bourgeat copper unshined for at least 10 years but very well used
    Global knives
    Wolf range
    All sorts of useless and semi-useful spoons, ladels, etc.
    2 blenders and a cuisinart that I have had since my first apartment (2nd year of college)
    Random nonstick skillets

    For dishes and glasses:
    Danish china from the 50s
    Rosenthal Moon plates etc
    Lobmyer crystal
    Castiglioni silver
     
  11. Dmax

    Dmax Senior member

    Messages:
    1,302
    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2006
    Location:
    People's Republic of the Five Boroughs
    All knives cut the same.

    Did you not mean all "sharp" knives cut the same? I would say that high end Japanese knives cut better than most Western knives. They are generally made thinner and sharper could be resharpen to a degree not possible with other knives. They also stay sharper much longer than other knives, due to better, harder steel.
    [​IMG]
     
  12. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    14,384
    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2006
    Location:
    The wild and the pure.
    Did you not mean all "sharp" knives cut the same? I would say that high end Japanese knives cut better than most Western knives. They are generally made thinner and sharper could be resharpen to a degree not possible with other knives. They also stay sharper much longer than other knives, due to better, harder steel. [​IMG]
    Yes, dull knives only cut hands [​IMG]. Japanese knives are great, and I love my Globals, but they don't make the food taste better. I can cut even pieces with any sharp knives, but the Globals are nice and light, look cool and, as you said, stay sharp a long time. As for harder steel, there are upsides and downsides. It is easier to hone a softer knife and no knife will get as sharp as an old carbon Sabatier or similar, but tey discolor food and need a lot of maintenance. The other downside to Japanese knives is the lack of a protector on the heel end like all of tehr knives have. It is not a roblem in and of itself, but if you are used to having one you can hurt yourself.
     
  13. skalogre

    skalogre Senior member

    Messages:
    6,324
    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2006
    Did you not mean all "sharp" knives cut the same? I would say that high end Japanese knives cut better than most Western knives. They are generally made thinner and sharper could be resharpen to a degree not possible with other knives. They also stay sharper much longer than other knives, due to better, harder steel. [​IMG]
    There are a few problems with that assertion. SLim and a few others may have some knowledge of this already but I can give you the example of the nihonto, the traditional japanese blade. While it sound impressive having a super strong steel edge, it is a bad idea because those sorts of steel are brittle. They chip and snap under stress. Traditionally what would have been done was forge the steel with different levels of hardening at the cutting edge versus the body that is softer thus allowing some flexibility (the Mongol invasion was one of the things that spurred these changes in forging primarily using knowledge from Korean smiths) The hamon is a result of this differential hardening process. Oh and technically traditional japanese steel was not damascened per se. The tamahagane-ore based folded steel was a different animal, the folding was due to the crappy qualiy of the steel available in Japan. The more folding was done, the greater the decrease in impurities that would potentially affect the quality of the end blade. Anyway, the point is that while super strong and thin sounds great it is not durable and not necessarily "sharper" That is why something like a titanium sword or other such malarkey is hogwash basically. Those Kyocera ceramic knives are similar in that they retain for longer periods their sharpness but they are brittle - ie don't drop them! Hit bone and there is a good chance the blade will be damaged. Why? Very sharp and strong but inflexible compared to good well forged steel. And as for the whole steel deal... Wusthof and Henckels have been doing this for a long time in Solingen, a centre of metallurgy for a long time. They know what they are doing. Edit: As per iammatt, I agree that the Global look very nice but that does not mean they are functionally better. I did not like their lightness and lack of a bolster. Plus it is easier to crush garlic with my heavy Wusthof Grand Prix, which is also found online at very low prices [​IMG]
     
  14. GQgeek

    GQgeek Senior member

    Messages:
    17,933
    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2002
    Location:
    Canuckistan
    I keep waiting for Bateman to reply "a nail gun and a human head next to the sorbet."
     
  15. Dmax

    Dmax Senior member

    Messages:
    1,302
    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2006
    Location:
    People's Republic of the Five Boroughs
    Yes, dull knives only cut hands [​IMG].

    Japanese knives are great, and I love my Globals, but they don't make the food taste better. I can cut even pieces with any sharp knives, but the Globals are nice and light, look cool and, as you said, stay sharp a long time.


    Funny you mention that. I distinctly remember a post by a gentelman on a knife forum who claimed he found a whole another layer of appreciation for his vegetable salad since he started slicing his onions paper thin using his ultra-sharp Japanese chef knife. I don't know if you are a sushi fan but the traditional Japanese cuisine is made possible by very specialized and very sharp knives of specific shape and size. These knives have to make very clean and precise cuts of fish and vegetables.

    The Yanagiba, a long slicer used to make precise slicing cuts in fish, certainly a knife you see in every Japanese restaurant:
    [​IMG]

    The Deba, a heavier knife used mostly to clean fish and vegetables.
    [​IMG]

    The Usuba, used to make precise slices of vegetables.
    [​IMG]

    And finally, one of the most beautiful interpretations of the western chef knife:

    [​IMG]

    As for harder steel, there are upsides and downsides. It is easier to hone a softer knife and no knife will get as sharp as an old carbon Sabatier or similar, but tey discolor food and need a lot of maintenance. The other downside to Japanese knives is the lack of a protector on the heel end like all of tehr knives have. It is not a roblem in and of itself, but if you are used to having one you can hurt yourself.

    I agree, there are certainly upsides and downsides. While there are still Japanese knives being offered in traditional high carbon non-stain resistant steel, most of the current excitement is concentrated in the new super steels (VG10, ZDP-189, Cowry-X) knives.
    What makes these new alloys superior is the ability to take and retain an edge as well or better than traditional high carbon steel knives while offering good rust/stain resistance.

    I agree with your point about the lack of bolster, present in traditional western forged knives. It does takes a little getting used to and I remember nicking myself a couple of times when I first started using Japanese knives.



    More boring knife info may follow. [​IMG]
     
  16. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    14,384
    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2006
    Location:
    The wild and the pure.
    Well, I am speaking from some experience and am not immune to buying new things. The various Japanese knives in this pic are at least 8 years old, and I never touch the ones other than the globals:[​IMG] For sushi you are certainly right that it helps, but for a vegetable salad, I am a bit dubious. It is kind of like guns: knives don't cut, people with good knife skills do.
     
  17. Luc-Emmanuel

    Luc-Emmanuel Senior member

    Messages:
    1,586
    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2005
    Location:
    Paris, France
    I have a bunch of these:

    [​IMG]

    http://www.couteaux-services.com/bou...g=lg_fr&num=12

    I'm not a knife geek, they are sharp and they look cool.

    I have a lot of stuff in my kitchen, but the stuff I use the most are my Cristel pans and my Staub cast iron oval "cocotte".
    A KitcheAid Artisan and an old Magimix food processor.
    China is a complete (inherited) Gien set from the 50's and Rosenthal "Love Story", flatware is (inherited again) silver Christofle.

    !luc
     
  18. Dmax

    Dmax Senior member

    Messages:
    1,302
    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2006
    Location:
    People's Republic of the Five Boroughs
    It is kind of like guns: knives don't cut, people with good knife skills do.
    [​IMG]
     
  19. Renault78law

    Renault78law Senior member

    Messages:
    2,141
    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2003
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    Anyone know where to get a professional/commercial quality knife magnet rack? Similar to the one posted by Kent?

    By the way, are there any reasons not to use said method for storing knives?
     

Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by