What do those numbers mean?

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by d.h., May 25, 2004.

  1. d.h.

    d.h. Well-Known Member

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    On Jantzen, for instance, in Fabrics, I see 100's, 110's, etc.

    Can anyone explain these?
     


  2. ClassMan

    ClassMan Member

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    I think that those mean thread count per a certain area, (although I am clueless as to which area that is.  Centimeter?  Square inch?  Foot? Yard? Acre?)

    I will add to your question so maybe these can be clarified as well.

    I have seen fractional numbers on fabric cards.  for example cm. 148/150 and gr.mtl. 165/175.  what do those mean?

    All help is appreciated.

    Thanks.

    CM
     


  3. Millerp

    Millerp Senior member

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  4. johnnynorman3

    johnnynorman3 Senior member

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    The thread counts are per square inch.

    I remember, however, once reading that numbers in suits -- for example Super 120s -- referred to how far you could "stretch" the strand of fiber. Not sure if I'm remembering correctly or not -- perhaps the Super indicates the stretching potential.
     


  5. banksmiranda

    banksmiranda Senior member

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    Contrary to common belief, the number does not refer to threads per unit area, e.g. threads per square inch. Â Cherrytree, whom unfortunately we have not heard from in some time, and I wrote a few posts on the topic some time back: thrad count posts some excerpts:
     


  6. Shirtmaven

    Shirtmaven Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    148-150 cm is the width this fabric is 59/60" wide

    165/175 is the weight in grams. These numbers are rather useless to the consumer.

    120's or 170/2 have more meaning. This is the yarn size and not yarns per inch.

    HIgher the count, the finer the yarn
    Some mills finish better then others.
    120's from Ferno are better then 140's from Japan.
     


  7. d.h.

    d.h. Well-Known Member

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    What's the difference, where N is some number:

    N's and N/2?

    Like, what do -'s and -/2 mean?
     


  8. johnnynorman3

    johnnynorman3 Senior member

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    Thanks for the clarification here on "counts." I had previously known for a certainty that a shirt with "180s cotton" was not made up of cotton with a "180 thread count," as in a "180 count bed sheet." I knew that my 180s CT shirts felt much softer than my 800 thread count bed sheets. But then some of these posts confused me, as did some misinformation on other websites.

    But it is ridiculous how uninformed even salespeople are. I heard a customer ask what the "120s" meant on the sleeve of a suit that he was about to buy off the peg. The salesman said, "It refers to how many times the fabric is woven." The customer's eyes lit up like a light bulb went off. I wanted to intervene, but the customer was so hopeless fashion wise -- he was a fat man who was wearing what appeared to be a skintight 3 button suit made of tinfoil with only the bottom 2 buttons fastened (and I'm not kidding) -- that I didn't want to upset the salesman.
     


  9. regularjoe

    regularjoe Senior member

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    /2 indicates 2-ply like 2-ply toilet paper (sorry for the analogy).
     


  10. East Coaster

    East Coaster Active Member

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    It is quite sad when you walk into shops on Jermyn Street and the young men pushing 4 for the price of 3 have not been educated in the language of shirting
     


  11. Cho Tucker

    Cho Tucker Member

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    100s, 110s
    They are not thread counts. They are yarn counts a.k.a. yarn numbers that express the fineness or coarseness of a yarn.

    Here, I assume we're talking about cotton fabric so the unit must be Ne. For Ne unit, when the number goes up the yarn gets finer. 110 is finer than 100. Ne100 means 100 x 840yd of this yarn weighs 1 pound.

    Why is there the letter "s"? Above Ne40 count, the numbers are increased by 10s like 50, 60, 70 and anything from 60 to 69 is called 60s.
     
    Last edited: Apr 19, 2016


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