What did you eat last night for dinner?

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by Fabienne, Jan 31, 2005.

  1. Piobaire

    Piobaire Not left of center?

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    As always, you guys continue to impress me. M&M, some of your dishes are looking decidedly tasty and show promise. Others are still...works in progress. Definite advances though.

    So here's some random phone pics from the last week or so:

    [​IMG]

    Braised short rib sliders with manchego and caramelized onions.

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    I grilled a ribeye, did some onions and baked sprouts.

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    Grilling carne asada with some mushrooms and onions on skewers. Looking at this, I should have waited to take pic until I flipped them so they had some grill lines.

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    The chef had two of these, plated nicely, and we each had one. So the mess is my fault. Housemade bacon on heirloom tomato, lettuce, very tasty silver dollar pancake...his take on BLT.

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    Goat cheese tart with housemade chorizo and some sort of reduction, frise salad.

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    Duck confit tacos, fresh corn salsa, house pickled veg.
     


  2. Joffrey

    Joffrey Senior member

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    Hi Piobaire, could you make something for me and then package it with dry ice and mail it? Preferably the food in 2nd picture.

    PM for address and paypal deets for costs.

    Thanks,

    Joffrey
     


  3. foodguy

    foodguy Senior member

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    well said. of course, bocuse always says the real revolution in nouvelle cuisine was that chefs and not maitre d's started owning restaurants.


    wouldn't that make you argumentative, too?
     


  4. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt The Liberator Dubiously Honored

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    I think most of them were the sons of fathers who owned small, unremarkable restaurants and sent their sons to Point to learn. Of course, one of the great things about the whole movement, which of course did have its excesses, is that these chef owned restaurants were naturally in the provinces (who could afford to buy a place in Paris) and that brought some of the great regional food into "haute cuisine." It also paved the path for Parisian restaurants to serve more regional food. People think of Robuchon now only as sort of an apostle of Japanese/French tiny plates, but when he made his name, it was as much with pig's head and potatoes as with traditional Parisian food.
     


  5. Piobaire

    Piobaire Not left of center?

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    :slayer:
     


  6. KJT

    KJT Senior member

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    I'm happy that you posted this, because it got me to do another search. Amazon has a couple versions on there and the one I was looking at was not available via Prime. Just ordered it for $9 or so, with Prime shipping. :slayer: If I ever get some time away from Bschool to actually cook, I'll post my efforts.
     


  7. mgm9128

    mgm9128 Senior member

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    Interested to know what your thoughts are on the impetus behind the transition from the "heavier", traditional, French cuisine, one that included copious amounts of butter and fat, to the much lighter and refined version we see today. Perusing through some of the old texts, I am hard-pressed to find a recipe that didn't include bacon fat or butter in some shape or form. Why is that?
     
    Last edited: Sep 9, 2011


  8. foodguy

    foodguy Senior member

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    it's an easy and cheap way to make food delicious. people were more active, so they burned more calories. people weren't obsessed with their weight.
     


  9. mgm9128

    mgm9128 Senior member

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    I believe it had something to do with this:
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Sep 9, 2011


  10. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt The Liberator Dubiously Honored

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    You are under the misconception that French food no longer contains copious amounts of butter. It does. The mix of fats changed partly because each region uses different fats, and as haute cuisine became less Paris centric, it moved to olive oil goose fat, etc.

    Anyway, I think that it isn't correct to say that food is more refined right now. I think, in many ways, one of the main things that happened in the 60s and 70s was a move away from food that was blandly cooked and highly decorated to food that was very well cooked with much more emphasis on flavor. In the US right now, I think there has been a move back to the old way. Food is getting worse, cooking is taking a backseat, plating is getting more intricate. To me this is very blah. It hasn't infected Europe as badly, from what I can see, but to me the "New American Food" is sophisticated, in the true sense of the word, rather than refined.

    Also health worries, but I don't think that is as big a factor as some people imagine. The calorie counts and fat counts in a high end meal today are outrageous.
     


  11. erictheobscure

    erictheobscure Senior member

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    I love this distinction and its etymological basis. I suppose if mgm were to let this point sink in, he'd reorient his culinary skills more radically.
     


  12. foodguy

    foodguy Senior member

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    i would quibble with this in the detail, if not in the sentiment. the biggest things that are happening in American cooking right now are charcuterie, pickles, organ meats, etc. foods with big flavors. i really don't see much of an emphasis on plating at all, once you get outside of a few obvious suspects (Daniel, TFL, Per Se, MGM and Matt's dinners, etc). If anything, American cooking has become much more Italianate, emphasizing casual "natural" plating and less manipulation of ingredients.
     


  13. mgm9128

    mgm9128 Senior member

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    I suppose I mean the move away from the use of heavier, butter based sauces (BĂ©arnaise, Beurre Blanc, etc).


    If I've learned anything, it is that the quality of the ingredients is pivotal in cooking. Regardless of the inherent skill of the chef, if his ingredients are inferior, it is as absurd to exact exceptional cooking as it is absurd to yell at a tree to produce more fruit. The job of the chef should be to simply elevate what nature provides him. And less is usually more.
     
    Last edited: Sep 9, 2011


  14. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt The Liberator Dubiously Honored

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    I don't know, you go out to dinner more than I do. All I ever see are a bunch of smears along with too small food all lacking much flavor. Even a place like Quince seems now to have everything cooked to the same soft texture with extra flourishes of smeared puree. Don't even get me started about the ultra ridiculous new, and hot, Atelier Crenn, which is basically just floral design on a plate with no flavor at all. It may be regional as well. Maybe LA is less infected. I don't go out for Western comfort food much, because it is easier, and more comfortable, for me to do that at home. The charcuterie craze is interesting, I wish the results were better.
     
    Last edited: Sep 9, 2011


  15. CouttsClient

    CouttsClient Senior member

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    When did you start applying this to your cooking?
     
    Last edited: Sep 9, 2011


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