What did you eat last night for dinner?

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by Fabienne, Jan 31, 2005.

  1. impolyt_one

    impolyt_one Senior member

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    Ramen broth, there were so many recipes I came across in my research that it was hard to pinpoint anything, but I'd probably end up winging it anyway and treating it as 1) pork bones and then 2) the things I steep in it to round that out, so I'd do something like this:

    Need:
    -a fuckload of pork bones - 6-8 lbs (?) of marrow-rich bones, like leg bones or something? Maybe ribs, no meat on them though. Preferably all cut up so that the marrow gets more surface contact with the water.
    -a dashi bag or big cheesecloth filled with: some small dried Japanese anchovies, a piece of kombu, some black peppercorns
    -a bottle of cheap sake (Gekkeikan et al)
    -a knob of ginger
    -an onion or two
    -a few long negi or a leek
    -sea salt
    -a small block of lard

    -I'd probably bring a huge stock pot half filled with water to a hard boil, drop the bones in really quick, give them a quick stir, and then dump them back out and drain and rinse them. This would be to get the impurities and scum off them, and bleed them off I guess (somebody else with an opinion can comment on this)
    - put bones back in, cover in sake and boil for like 5 minutes (?) (I don't know if you'd do this or skip this step and do the sake later, it's for covering the pork stink more than anything)
    - cover with water, put in seasoning bag of anchovies and kombu (eyeball that I guess, where your own cooking and taste come in)
    - wash and char up the ginger and onion, skin-on, and then chop those in half and put those in a bag and drop them in the soup
    - split the leek in half, wash it of dirt, drop that in the soup

    - keep it on a low boil for a long time, skim the crap that comes to the surface. 6 hours? 10? In any case, your stock should be looking like tonkotsu ramen broth by this point
    -fish out all the spent junk and them strain all the broth through a coarse sieve I guess. Need to get rid of the junk, but keep the cloudy collagen of it all
    -adjust seasoning and scent with sake, salt
    -pull little pieces of lard off the block and put them in the soup so they float and melt a little into globules of fat


    Serve with
    -ready made ramen noodles (a la JFC)
    -a hanjuku egg, some chopped green onions, some menma, some blanched bean sprouts, some blanched adult spinach or komatsuna cut to the same length so you can make a little stack in the corner of the bowl, etc, etc, etc

    chashu recipe is probably easier to find.
     
  2. foodguy

    foodguy Senior member

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    +1
    i usually do them wrapped in aluminum foil and then peel after roasting. i did try the salt-roasting, though, and really liked it. i'm still not sure about the leaving the skin on thing ... i guess if everything else at my dinner looked like a matt plate, i could get by with it.
     
  3. Nil

    Nil Senior member

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    :nodding:

    Eggplant is definitely my favorite vegetable. I have three different varieties in my fridge right now.

    I had the day off so I made zaalouk, a Moroccan eggplant and tomato cooked salad, for lunch and fish fragrant eggplant for an early dinner. The latter has become my go to meal lately.
     
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2011
  4. foodguy

    foodguy Senior member

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    deets?
     
  5. foodguy

    foodguy Senior member

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    if you use egg whites, the crust gets REALLY hard. if you just use water (you need just enough to turn coarse salt so it's like wet snow), it works just the same but is much easier to break open. depending on howmuch drama you want at the dinner table, it's your choice.
     
  6. mordecai

    mordecai Immoderator

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    Using water is what made me appreciate the method. The dough version is pretty cool though.
     
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2011
  7. foodguy

    foodguy Senior member

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    it is. and normally i'd be for anything that allowed me to bring a chisel to the dinner table.
     
  8. Alter

    Alter Senior member

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    Here are some pics from a shop in Sapporo...you can see the bag filled with their secret ingredients. After I snapped a couple of photos the guy told me not to take any pictures of the kitchen.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  9. indesertum

    indesertum Senior member

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    can you do this for pho?
     
  10. Nil

    Nil Senior member

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    http://appetiteforchina.com/recipes/spicy-sichuan-eggplant-fish-fragrant-eggplant/

    That's roughly the recipe I follow though I use a bit less black vinegar since I find it rather pungent. It's probably more authentic to deep fry the eggplant, but I skip that part to save on the oil sucking capabilities of eggplant. I sometimes add a little ground pork to it because everything tastes better with a little pig in it.
     
    Last edited: Sep 3, 2011
  11. impolyt_one

    impolyt_one Senior member

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    kinda similar I guess, that is what I was basing the above on anyway. Many people like to harp on about pho broth being clear - I agree that it needs to be clean, without an oily head, but I think pho should have a collagen-y cloudiness. It should be light but silken on the tongue. For pho I guess that level would be like a very fine miso soup, whereas tonkotsu ramen should be so white and emulsified that it's like milk. The lard oils the ramen noodles as you bring them out of the soup and adds a bit of weight, as do things like sesame oil, rayu, or doubanjiang if you choose to top with them.

    With ramen, you want the pork flavor, but you're all about covering that pork stink with stuff like ginger, garlic, lots of sake; the fish and the kombu would round out the broth. The roasted onions give sweetness.
    With pho, you're liquifyinh as much marrow as you can too, but you don't need to cover a beef smell. The ginger and onion do the same things, the spice sachet steeps in the broth like the anchovy/kombu does in the ramen, and then you don't need any alcohol, just some fish sauce and some rock sugar.
     
  12. GQgeek

    GQgeek Senior member

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    i ate at some mediocre arabic place in the mall last night. I've tried, but colombia really doesn't have any good restaurants. It's amazing, really. The restaurant experience in Peru was far superior.
     
  13. Piobaire

    Piobaire Not left of center?

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    Had some really good bar food last night. I have a crappy camera phone pic I'll upload later of the best dish: braised short rib sliders. Very nicely done, shredded off the bone, melted manchego, caramelized onions on fresh little buns. Really hit the spot as we watched the sun set over some beautiful scenery and caught up with a couple of friends we've not seen since before Xmas.
     
  14. impolyt_one

    impolyt_one Senior member

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    [​IMG]
     
  15. Alter

    Alter Senior member

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    Did you get that in Seoul? I didn't think they were making that one anymore. A buddy of mine works at Nestle here in Japan so I always get to try the strange kitkats...yuzukosho and ginger ale were better than expected. Apple vinegar was...hard to describe.
     

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