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What did you eat last night for dinner?

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by Fabienne, Jan 31, 2005.

  1. Manton

    Manton RINO Dubiously Honored

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    I had no power but I had gas so I lit the burners with a match and cooked two meals that way.
     


  2. mgm9128

    mgm9128 Senior member

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    Just like Taubes, right?
     


  3. indesertum

    indesertum Senior member

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    uggh. taubes is a fraud, but teh concept of sealing juices is like the world is still flat idea compared to taubes

    not taking the bait
     
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2011


  4. mgm9128

    mgm9128 Senior member

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    Again, I hardly ever cook with flour (mostly due to Taubes) so I was just regurgitating what some chick at Williams Sonoma told me a few years ago at a cooking demonstration. It seems she was wrong.
     
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2011


  5. BlackToothedGrin

    BlackToothedGrin Senior member

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    Adding flour should pull even more water from the cells on the surface of the meat through osmosis. But any dry substance would act the same way: salt, baking powder, etc.
     


  6. foodguy

    foodguy Senior member

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    hmm, yes, it would be interesting to know the browning temp of flour ... but i am having a hard time finding a source on it ... as basic as that information might seem. As it is governed by the maillard reaction, maybe it just falls into the same general range ... 280 to 300 is where it begins.
    one interesting and important note: browning of flour (dextrinization), also reduces its thickening capacity, so keep that in mind (that's why a gumbo thickened with a darkened roux isn't pasty).
    and please don't get me started on teh whole "seals in juices" thing. while it is literally true that searing/browning/flouring doesn't "seal in juices" it is also literally true that searing/browning/flouring does make meat seem juicier, because it makes it smell and taste better, which triggers our salivary glands and more than half of our perceived juiciness of a piece of meat is derived from our own saliva.
    full-fledged geekery is dancing on quicksand.
     


  7. foodguy

    foodguy Senior member

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    this, of course, would depend on how long the dry substance was left on the meat before cooking. it would take quite some time (no, i don't know how long) for flour to draw moisture from meat through osmosis.
     


  8. Manton

    Manton RINO Dubiously Honored

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    The "seal in the juices" thing was disproved by McGee. But before it was, it was repeated in a bajillion cookbooks over several decades so it is widely believed. I believed it for a long time myself.
     


  9. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt The Liberator Dubiously Honored

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    Not to mention it is a rather beneficial myth, for the reasons foodguy enumerates. On the other hand, there is great benefit in cooking slowly and letting browning happen at a more gradual pace, so...
     


  10. foodguy

    foodguy Senior member

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    yes, but one thing we can all agree on: brown is good.
     


  11. cronicmole

    cronicmole Senior member

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    thats why I like edmorel
     


  12. gomestar

    gomestar Super Yelper

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    Tuscan is brown.

    /Buford
     


  13. Rambo

    Rambo Senior member

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    Also, for farmer.
     


  14. Joffrey

    Joffrey Senior member

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    Damn I haven't seen a watermelon with real seeds in a good while. Kind of miss them
     


  15. Rambo

    Rambo Senior member

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    I'M IN MIAMI, BITCH
    

    Ok, now I'll be the first one to bitch and moan about the limited availability of quality produce where I live, but even I can get a fucking watermelon with seeds.
     


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