What did you eat last night for dinner?

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by Fabienne, Jan 31, 2005.

  1. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt The Liberator Dubiously Honored

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    OK, it is not a ghetto roux at all. It is the traditional way to make a lot of French dishes. As for thickeners, if you are going to use just one, the best is probably xanthan gum, because its thickening power is the same as it cools, it is tasteless, and you need just a touch. I don't think there is much call for thickeners, but if you do need one...
     


  2. Manton

    Manton RINO Dubiously Honored

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    Arrowroot works on anything but it's for slurries, not roux or singer. At least, I never have tried to cook it. It's expensive so for anything on which flour works, use flour. For a late "fix" arrowroot is much better and does not need to be cooked.
     
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2011


  3. indesertum

    indesertum Senior member

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    i thought the singer part of it was the sprinkled in the pan bit, not the flouring the meat bit although i guess it has the same effect
     


  4. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt The Liberator Dubiously Honored

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    No, it is the name for flouring meat for a certain purpose. You can flour meat for a lot of reasons, but when you flour it, brown and add liquid so that the flour helps thicken, then it is singer.
     


  5. Rambo

    Rambo Senior member

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    Hmm. If you weren't going to brown the meat and then create some sort of sauce, why bother flouring it? Other than something like a flour/egg wash kind of thing.
     


  6. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt The Liberator Dubiously Honored

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    Meuniere. A lot of things that are difficult to brown get floured so that instead of being pale, they get a nice golden color. Look at mm's sole. It doesn't look like it was floured, but it should have been, imo. Also, some people flour foie gras because it gives an interesting textural difference.
     


  7. Manton

    Manton RINO Dubiously Honored

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    You can flour meat to thicken a liquid, to help something stick to it, or to create a light crust.
     


  8. Rambo

    Rambo Senior member

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    Interesting. Thanks for the explanation.
     


  9. impolyt_one

    impolyt_one Senior member

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    Pretty horrific, like I said. If you need to eat over here, just go to a department store upper floor and get your meals there. It's only a couple bucks more. They have certain standards and some liability, as well as enough money so they don't have to re-use the banchan. Seriously, there are signs in these places that proudly announce that 'we don't re-use food!' - however, I've only seen a few of these signs before... :uhoh:

    I've actually never had a case of food poisoning in Korea... but I can't say that it's always happy times in the bathroom. I eat Korean food about once or twice a month nowadays though.

    Given that some hygiene things are just cultural, I wouldn't expect much more from Korean restaurants outside of Korea. There is just no culture that stops a lot of these people from going ass to hand.
    I hope for better in Japan, and it is, but I guess at times there are still some 'earthy' people out there. I rarely eat other people's home cooked food as well. I get into a 'What about Bob?' mode and just shut myself in.
     


  10. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt The Liberator Dubiously Honored

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    No prob.
     


  11. mordecai

    mordecai Immoderator

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    +1
     


  12. otc

    otc Senior member

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    Made minted pea and spinach soup last night. I think I returned a little bit too much of the cooking liquid after pureeing it so it was too thin but otherwise quite good...hopefully good for lunch too. Came up a little short on the mint since apparently a half bunch from an 80's cookbook is about 2 cups of loose leaves while an entire package of today's mint is not even 2cups (and I was making more like 1.5X the recipe).

    Will consume again for lunch :)
     


  13. lemmywinks

    lemmywinks Senior member

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    Had sea urchin, crab, and shrimp for dinner.

    Smoked a little weed then had lots of siu mai and some Chinese Taro/Chicken rice.
     


  14. foodguy

    foodguy Senior member

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    a couple stray thoughts on the starch question:
    starches vary in their "purity" ... not whether they're clean or not, but how much protein they contain. flour is very impure, lots of proteins ... the proteins refract the light and make the sauce appear dull (some of this can be lessened by long cooking and careful skimming). starches such as arrowroot, cornstarch and potato starch are very low in protein, so sauces made from them will naturally be clearer and more glossy. there are other properties that separate the starches, though, so it's not just a matter of substituting one for the other. different starches have different thickening abilities (the amount required to gel a set amount of liquid), and they also have different textures (have you ever used too much cornstarch and wound up with a sticky, stringy mess?).
    also, there's one other way to incorporate starch into a sauce and that is beurre manie ... which isn't used much anymore, but is handy. basically you knead butter and flour together into a thick paste, then whisk it bit by bit into a simmering liquid until you've achieved the thickness you want.
    finally, lightly flouring meat doesn't actually produce a crust (unless you use a WHOLE lot). but what it does do is absorb any moisture that may be left on the surface of the meat so that it will brown more efficiently.
    that is all.
     


  15. mgm9128

    mgm9128 Senior member

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    Day 2 of cooking with no power.
    [​IMG]
     


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