What did you eat last night for dinner?

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by Fabienne, Jan 31, 2005.

  1. drizzt3117

    drizzt3117 Senior member

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    Tonight:

    Redrock chili (cincinnati style, god i miss this stuff) with cheese bread
    2003 Ch. St. Michelle Riesling Icewine, wonderful stuff.
     


  2. PHV

    PHV Senior member

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    You eat icewine with entres? With a hot chili I'd probably opt for a Zinfandel, but an Icewine is too sweet for anything substantial, I usually have after dinner.

    Have you tried any Niagara ice wines? I have never seen any mention of them on here, despite them being some of the most highly regarded in the world.
     


  3. drizzt3117

    drizzt3117 Senior member

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    I had it after dinner, not with the chili, after watching sideways.
     


  4. marc37

    marc37 Senior member

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    3Oz of wheatgrass juice.
    Alfalfa sprouts (Raw)
    Chick pea sprouts (Raw)
    Sesame seed sprouts (Raw)
    Sunflower greens (Raw)
    Adzuki bean sprouts (Raw)
    Buckwheat greens (Raw)
    Weeds (Raw) non-poisoness variety.
    +
    Small cooked stir fry.(Cooked in cold pressed Olive oil)
    Stir fry= egg plant, capsicum, beans, lentils (orange and green), broccolli, colli-flower, rice sprouts.
     


  5. Fabienne

    Fabienne Senior member

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    I bought a bottle of Niagara vin de glace right before I left Canada last time and brought it home. We had it as an apÃ[​IMG]ritif. It was pleasant, indeed.
     


  6. Fabienne

    Fabienne Senior member

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    Yesterday being Candlemas, crêpes, of course.  Filled with a thick bechamel with plenty of comtÃ[​IMG] cheese, and heated in a pan till golden.
     


  7. kabert

    kabert Senior member

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    A huge bowl of soup, which was an ad hoc blend of rice, chicken, a touch of coconut milk, and a blend of other veggies. Very heartwarming. Washed down with a Heineken.
     


  8. tiger02

    tiger02 Militarist

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    I like this game.

    penne but the pasta is only the base for the sauce so

    a simple homemade marinara plus olives which is only a base for

    an Apuglian Nero di Troia/aglianico blend
    plus
    Ca'lem 10 yr old port
    which I've never heard of before but is easily on a level with 20 yr old Taylor Fladgate, which is my current baseline

    Espresso, of course. Made in a macchinetta, not some fancy 'lectric doodad.

    Tom
     


  9. tiger02

    tiger02 Militarist

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    Isn't terroir as a wine 'idea' less than thirty years old? Â Someone more expert than me here is going to have to weigh in, but I was under the impression that current wine-rating schemes are a result of a very precisely planned push towards ideas of terroir (place?) and fruit/food overtones. Â That said, I fully agree that I'd rather find a full, smooth, fruity, dry example of any given grape then blanketly claim a love for Montepulciano. Tom
     


  10. drizzt3117

    drizzt3117 Senior member

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    I've had a few Niagara ice wines, they are quite good. I think my favorite style is still the TBA/select late harvest though. That CSM icewine was quite delicious though, apparently they improve with time as well.
     


  11. Fabienne

    Fabienne Senior member

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    Originally Posted by Fabienne,Feb. 02 2005,14:10
    And that, in my opinion, is mainly because the grape is not the main determining factor (necessarily, with blends). Â How much sun, weather, the soil, what we call the "terroir" (There is no good translation for the word), etc., all these factors influence the end result, as we all know.
    Isn't terroir as a wine 'idea' less than thirty years old? Â Someone more expert than me here is going to have to weigh in, but I was under the impression that current wine-rating schemes are a result of a very precisely planned push towards ideas of terroir (place?) and fruit/food overtones. Â That said, I fully agree that I'd rather find a full, smooth, fruity, dry example of any given grape then blanketly claim a love for Montepulciano. Tom
    The word and notion of "terroir" dates back at least to the 14th century (probably 12th century, in a different form). Â I don't understand what you are trying to say, could you rephrase your thought? Â Terroir means a combination of soil, location, atmospheric conditions, a stretch of land considered on the point of view of its aptitudes (for wine growing, in this case).
     


  12. Ambulance Chaser

    Ambulance Chaser Senior member

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    Dinner at D.A.'s R.F.D., home to one of the best beer selections in Washington, D.C.: scallops fish and chips Huyghe Floris Apple beer Leffe Bruin beer Lindemans Framboise beer Huyghe Delerium Nocturnum beer I realized this morning that I should have drank more water before going to bed last night . . .
     


  13. tiger02

    tiger02 Militarist

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    Sorry, OK, I'll try again. Didn't realize terroir was such an established concept. I read somewhere (of course, can't remember where) that within the last 20-30 years, there was a conscious push to move away from wine reviews that used words like 'noble' and towards words like 'currant.' Could be wrong, I'm new to this.

    Tom
     


  14. PHV

    PHV Senior member

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    (tiger02 @ Feb. 03 2005,12:50)
    And that, in my opinion, is mainly because the grape is not the main determining factor (necessarily, with blends). Â How much sun, weather, the soil, what we call the "terroir" (There is no good translation for the word), etc., all these factors influence the end result, as we all know.
    Isn't terroir as a wine 'idea' less than thirty years old? Â Someone more expert than me here is going to have to weigh in, but I was under the impression that current wine-rating schemes are a result of a very precisely planned push towards ideas of terroir (place?) and fruit/food overtones. Â That said, I fully agree that I'd rather find a full, smooth, fruity, dry example of any given grape then blanketly claim a love for Montepulciano. Tom
    The word and notion of "terroir" dates back at least to the 14th century (probably 12th century, in a different form). Â I don't understand what you are trying to say, could you rephrase your thought? Â Terroir means a combination of soil, location, atmospheric conditions, a stretch of land considered on the point of view of its aptitudes (for wine growing, in this case).
    Territory is a good english equivalent.
     


  15. november

    november Well-Known Member

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    i had rigatoni with bok choy, soy sauce, and chopped beef liver...i used to hate liver as a kid but i don't mind cooking it from time to time...
     


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