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What did you eat last night for dinner?

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by Fabienne, Jan 31, 2005.

  1. Fabienne

    Fabienne Senior member

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    Are you knowingly trying to torture me? Why do you ask such questions, when all supermarkets offer is perdue chicken?

    Yes, of course, I've had poulet de Bresse. That's all my mother ever buys.
     
  2. globetrotter

    globetrotter Senior member

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    I used to smuggle them home - I would go to a market on my way to the airport and get a chicken and some various sausages, once a pheasant, put them in a soft ice pack in my suitcase and cook dinner when I got home.

    Once I brought enough sausages and beer for a large party that way, coming home from germany.
     
  3. Fabienne

    Fabienne Senior member

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    I've done similar things, but I have never tried fresh meat, I have to bow. You know the point that the customs officer asks you if you have any foie gras, any meats, any bread, etc...? And you answer no, trying to look angelic? And he decides that your suitcase is going to go through the machine? Twice now, the officers have looked at each other, upon examining my suitcase, smiled and let me go. They've never confiscated any of my purchases.

    I find it helps if you wear a business suit. Even if you visit family, it's always a business trip, when the immigration officer asks.
     
  4. Stu

    Stu Senior member

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    They are I believe the hottest peppers in the universe, even marginally hotter than the famed Mexican Habanero. If you know what you are getting into when you eat them, and are thus prepared, they are great. They make a great simple table sauce if you chop up about 5 of them, mix them with some key lime juice and salt.

    They also pair well with mango and papaya and cilantro for a nice fruity hot sauce that dresses grilled fish.

    I can see how they wouldn't have worked with the Cambodian stir fry, though. You either have to pair them with something citrusy or build them into a complex forumla of flavors so the heat blends rather than dominates.
     
  5. globetrotter

    globetrotter Senior member

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    (globetrotter @ Feb. 01 2005,08:18) I used to smuggle them home - I would go to a market on my way to the airport and get a chicken and some various sausages, once a pheasant, put them in a soft ice pack in my suitcase and cook dinner when I got home. Once I brought enough sausages and beer for a large party that way, coming home from germany.
    I've done similar things, but I have never tried fresh meat, I have to bow. Â You know the point that the customs officer asks you if you have any foie gras, any meats, any bread, etc...? Â And you answer no, trying to look angelic? Â And he decides that your suitcase is going to go through the machine? Â Twice now, the officers have looked at each other, upon examining my suitcase, smiled and let me go. Â They've never confiscated any of my purchases. I find it helps if you wear a business suit. Â Even if you visit family, it's always a business trip, when the immigration officer asks.
    the only time I have ever been busted was when I tried to get 3 boxes of orchids from thailand through. I basically had a big white bag that said Bankok duty free, that looked like 3 flower boxes, on my luggage cart. but you can get fantastic orchids for about $25 per 100 or so buds. Last year I brought a piece of spainish ham through that lasted me just under a year. mmmmm.....
     
  6. Fabienne

    Fabienne Senior member

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    Originally Posted by Fabienne,Jan. 31 2005,20:07
    Scotch Bonnet peppers. Â I remember cooking with those, three years ago, after a visit to a local farmer's market. Â Not knowing the potency, I used half of one in a Cambodian stir-fry. Â Husband, father, and two cats had to be evacuated.....
    They are I believe the hottest peppers in the universe, even marginally hotter than the famed Mexican Habanero. Â If you know what you are getting into when you eat them, and are thus prepared, they are great. They make a great simple table sauce if you chop up about 5 of them, mix them with some key lime juice and salt. They also pair well with mango and papaya and cilantro for a nice fruity hot sauce that dresses grilled fish. I can see how they wouldn't have worked with the Cambodian stir fry, though. You either have to pair them with something citrusy or build them into a complex forumla of flavors so the heat blends rather than dominates.
    So you use them primarily without cooking them? Â I think that was my mistake, the fact that I cooked my one half on high heat and the fumes engulfed the whole house. As for the subject of children, my son surprises me: he will eat spicy food without batting an eyelash. Â We have Indian friends, and he loves the crunchy snacks that they are so fond of. Â And other times, he wants pasta or peas with nothing on. Â Last night, he had boursin (cheese heavy on garlic and herbs). Â Then went on to a strong goat cheese.
     
  7. kabert

    kabert Senior member

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    This probably doesn't sound appetizing, but it was very tasty:

    "Mexican" casserole -- diced chicken, w/corn, bean, peppers and other "stuff" and herbs/spices, topped with tortillas slathered in some kind of smoky/spicy sauce. Homemade by my amazing wife. Lots left for a couple days of no-cost lunches.

    green salad

    day-old (but warmed up) homemade biscuits

    1997 Foppiano petite sirah (Napa)

    orange popsicle as dessert
     
  8. Fabienne

    Fabienne Senior member

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    We're also big on leftovers. The only problem with that is, drawn by the aromas, curious co-workers ask many questions. Giving out the name is never enough, you get into an explanation, and your dish gets cold in the meantime. Sometimes, I like a little privacy with my food.
     
  9. topcatny

    topcatny Senior member

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    Grilled chicken on Romaine lettuce with goat cheese, red peppers and homemade vinagrette dressing.
    1 glass of unremarkable chianti after dinner
     
  10. Bradford

    Bradford Senior member

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    Geez - I am pretty boring... last night - Chili made by my wife with ground beef, canned tomatoes and chili seasonings - eaten with saltine crackers Glass of milk Bradford [​IMG]
     
  11. chorse123

    chorse123 Senior member

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    Nothing wrong with your dinner, Bradford. [​IMG] I have to say, I like to drink milk with meals and every time I do so, someone - friend, spouse, other - comments that it is strange. What's so strange about a glass of milk???
     
  12. Bradford

    Bradford Senior member

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    Nothing strange about drinking milk to me - my wife and I drink about 2 gallons a week.

    I actually meant my food seems kind of boring in comparison to some of the other "fancy" meals that everyone is mentioning.

    Bradford
     
  13. Fabienne

    Fabienne Senior member

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    I find that the simplest dishes are often the best. They haven't made it through several centuries without a reason.

    Last night was salmon in a lemongrass and lime leaves broth, served with basmati rice. It was not spectacular, but the kitchen smelled wonderful.
     
  14. PeterMetro

    PeterMetro Senior member

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    Care to share your recipe for jerk? I go to a place in Bushwick for jerk chicken, but they won't divulge the recipe...
     
  15. Walter

    Walter Senior member

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    I had some home made "pot au feu" my wife cooked for me. Washed it down with some nice but unexpensive Portuguese red wine.

    (Pot-au-Feu, a French boiled dinner, has been called the "foundation glory of French Cuisine" as well as France's National Dish. In the cookbook Tante Marie: La bonne et vieille cuisine française this dish forms the basis of many other dishes, from simple bouillion to Beef au Gratin, Hachis Parmentier, Meatballs with sauce and many more.
    Pronounced: poh tuh fuh sa(n)pl)

    Is it possible among my generation in the US (I am 30) to find a wife that cooks a nice meal for when you come home from work? American women  always seem so feminist to me.
     
  16. Fabienne

    Fabienne Senior member

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    We have leftover salmon. [​IMG]
     
  17. Fabienne

    Fabienne Senior member

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    Your best bet is assuredly to find yourself a foreign wife [​IMG] (I'm going to get killed for that.)
     
  18. Walter

    Walter Senior member

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    (Walter @ Feb. 01 2005,11:45) Is it possible among my generation in the US (I am 30) to find a wife that cooks a nice meal for when you come home from work? American women  always seem so feminist to me.
    Your best bet is assuredly to find yourself a foreign wife  [​IMG] (I'm going to get killed for that.)
    Don't tell your friends you said that. My wife is French but then I don't live in the US. I was just curious. Btw if you like Belgian chocolate have a box of Marcolini when you come to Brussels. A bit expensive, but it's worth it.
     
  19. topcatny

    topcatny Senior member

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    Originally Posted by Walter,Feb. 01 2005,11:45
    Is it possible among my generation in the US (I am 30) to find a wife that cooks a nice meal for when you come home from work? American women  always seem so feminist to me.
    Your best bet is assuredly to find yourself a foreign wife  [​IMG] (I'm going to get killed for that.)
    I don't think you need to find a foreign wife. Â If my wife didn't have to work she would definitely cook more. Â As it is she cooks often and she works almost as much as me. I think it really comes down to finding a woman who values that. Â My wife was raised by a stay at home mom who cooked dinner 360 nights a year (she was FOB from Italy though so maybe the foreign thing does mean something). Â Anyway my wife grew up seeing that and wishes she had more time to do the same. Â Unfortunately, our life right now is too busy to expect a home cooked meal every night.
     
  20. Stu

    Stu Senior member

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    Originally Posted by Stu,Jan. 31 2005,16:33
    I cooked a Jamacian jerked pork -- a big ole' pork shoulder slathered with homemade jerk sauce.
    Care to share your recipe for jerk? Â I go to a place in Bushwick for jerk chicken, but they won't divulge the recipe...
    Ask and ye shall receive. Jerked Pork 4-5 pound leg or shoulder of pork (pernil) ¼ C lime juice 1 t garlic powder 1 t fresh thyme leaves 1 t coarsely ground allspice ¼ C jerk rub (recipe below) ¼ C soy sauce 1 scotch bonnet pepper, chopped Wash the pork in cold water, rubbing it thoroughly with lime juice. Rinse and pat dry.  Make crisscross incision on each side of the cut of pork, wide and deep enough to accommodate the tip of a forefinger. In a small bowl, combine the garlic powder, thyme, allspice and half of the jerk rub. Mix well, then stuff the incisions with the mixture. Whatever is left over, combine with the remainder of the jerk rub and rub over the entire pork. Place the pork in a deep dish and pour the soy sauce over it. Cover and refrigerate  overnight, or for at least 3 hours.  Leave uncovered at room temp for an hour before cooking.  When ready to cook, preheat oven to 350 degrees, then transfer the pork to aluminum foil and stuff the incision with the chopped Scotch Bonnet pepper. Pour any remaining jerk rub or pepper over the pork and wrap aluminum foil around it tightly. Place in a baking pan and bake for 4 hours. Remove the foil and bake uncovered for another ½ hour, basting with the pan juices. Remove the pork from the pan and place on a cutting board. Set aside the pan juices. Hack the pork with a sharp cleaver, as is the fashion for true jerk, and transfer the pieces to a serving platter. Pour the pan juices over the meat and serve. Jerk Rub ¾  C finely chopped scallions (white and green parts) 1 T salt 1 t ground allspice ½ t ground nutmeg ¼ t ground cinnamon 4 Scotch Bonnet or Habaneros, or 6 jalapenos. Cut in half, seeds retained 1 t freshly ground black pepper mix all ingredients and mash into a paste in a mortar. Then scrape into a blender or food processor and blend for 1 minute. If you need to, you can add a tablespoon of distilled white vinegar to aid in blending. Store in a covered jar in the fridge. The rub will last for several months.
     

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