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What did you eat last night for dinner?

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by Fabienne, Jan 31, 2005.

  1. HORNS

    HORNS Senior member

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    [​IMG]

    Nice! I haven't had a good chicken pot pie in ages. Perfect for this time of year.
     
  2. GusW

    GusW Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    It was a nice change after all sorts of rich Holiday food.
     
  3. Alter

    Alter Senior member

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    We had chicken pot pies, made from scratch by my wife. Delicious puff pastry on top, yummy!


    Looks good but...why is there a letter G on it?
     
  4. DNW

    DNW Senior member

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    Looks good but...why is there a letter G on it?

    G for come and git some, or his name is Georgie. [​IMG]
     
  5. GusW

    GusW Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Looks good but...why is there a letter G on it?

    My wife put our initials on each pastry.
     
  6. Alter

    Alter Senior member

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    My wife put our initials on each pastry.
    I figured, but considering your work on the "These are fake" thread thought that it might be indicating a cup size. [​IMG]
     
  7. Tokyo Slim

    Tokyo Slim Senior member

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    edit, question was already answered. [​IMG]
     
  8. VKK3450

    VKK3450 Senior member

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    Homemade falafel and pita. [​IMG]

    Did you deep fry them at home?

    I tried oven baking, but didnt turn out so good...

    K
     
  9. kwilkinson

    kwilkinson Senior member

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    Did you deep fry them at home?

    I tried oven baking, but didnt turn out so good...

    K


    For sure. Gotta turn that hood fan on high though, or your apt will smell like shit for a year. You could also just have a half inch of oil in a pan and fry them one side at a time if you don't want to d the entire deep frying thing.
     
  10. philosophe

    philosophe Senior member

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    For sure. Gotta turn that hood fan on high though, or your apt will smell like shit for a year. You could also just have a half inch of oil in a pan and fry them one side at a time if you don't want to d the entire deep frying thing.

    Word. Thank goodness for three good felafel options here in Philly (Mama's, Hamifgash, and Zahav for those who wonder.)
     
  11. kwilkinson

    kwilkinson Senior member

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    Word. Thank goodness for three good felafel options here in Philly (Mama's, Hamifgash, and Zahav for those who wonder.)

    I had never had it before, not done well at least. I was surprised at how well it came out. Should have snapped a few pics, since it's easy to make at home.


    And now, Alter has inspired me. I bought some pork bones and am starting a pork stock tonight. Tomorrow the roomie and I will have some ramen. Pics of the process will follow so all you fools can see just how incredibly easy it all is.
    To hold me over while making the stock: fresh baguette, Cowgirl Creamery Mt. Tam, Cypress Grove Fog Lights, some local chorizo, and local Sopressata, and some local country pate w/ black peppercorns. Life is good.
     
  12. BillyMaysHere!

    BillyMaysHere! Senior member

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    I made Huevos Rancheros, because I figured I'd try it out and I don't have time on weekday mornings. First time I'd made Refried Beans (not exactly a staple dish where I live), and it turned out really well considering I had no real battle plan. Made enough beans so I could also have them for breakfast tomorrow, oh yeah! \t[​IMG]
     
  13. Histrion

    Histrion Senior member

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    I went out for dinner last night... Here's what I had:

    Local Cauliflower Bisque (roasted piquillo coulis, dried olive, green onions, shaved parmesan, truffle oil)

    Roasted Lamb Rack " Mini Roast" & BBQ Ribs (Pan roasted baby vegetables, pumpkin seed pesto, serrano jus & burnt honey- tamarind BBQ paint)


    She had:

    Serrano Ham Tasting (blood orange oil, hibiscus poached pear, spiced and candied pistachios, Mahon cheese from the island of Menorca in Spain)

    Carbonara alla Romana (Gragnano pasta, crispy guanciale, pecorino romano, organic egg yolk emulsion, 3 cracked peppers)


    It was good times... and good food, too.
     
  14. Fabienne

    Fabienne Senior member

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    From scratch?

    Ramen is one of those foods that is so good (and cheap) in restaurants that we usually eat that when we are out. It is like Japanese fast food...shops are everywhere.

    Actually, it is rare for anyone to make the soup stock, roast pork or noodles at home. If we eat it at home we just use a packaged version and sometimes add a 7-minute boiled egg, some thinly sliced green onions or other vegetables and throw it all together.


    I'm a little saddened to hear that.
     
  15. kwilkinson

    kwilkinson Senior member

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    Tonight, we made ramen. Tonkotsu, to be exact.

    The process takes about a day and a half, unless you're one of those people who always has some kind of stock on hand. Yesterday morning, I got the pork stock started.
    I chose trotters for the initial stock b/c they have such great gelatinous quality. So much collagen. Maybe a more traditional French food guy like SField, Manton, or Matt would hate me for it, but I like to use them in stock.
    In this initial stock goes pork trotters (not roasted), water, onion, garlic, leek, ginger peel, and konbu. I let this summer for about 10 hours to get a pretty good white pork stock.

    Trotters:
    [​IMG]

    Veg:
    [​IMG]

    Stock going:
    [​IMG]

    It turns out pretty nicely.
    [​IMG]

    Then, I let that cool and put it in the fridge. This morning, I roasted off pork shanks-- chose shanks because I wanted the really great flavor and didn't need to add a whole lot of body for the secondary stock.

    Shanks:
    [​IMG]

    The stock obviously needs skimmed the entire time it is going. After about 8 hours with the shanks, it has great body and great pork flavor. I start to turn it from a stock into a ramen broth by adding some green onion bottoms and more ginger peel, and at this point I begin to salt it.
    [​IMG]

    That's basically it. Plate it with the noodles first, and then whatever you want with it. This time, I chose hard-boiled eggs, some japanese spice mix, green onion, pickled ginger, and a dot of sriracha. The dish needs a lot of work to become more visually appealing, but the flavor honestly just could not be any better.
    [​IMG]



    Oh, and here's a shot of the ginger used for pickled ginger:
    [​IMG]

    It is harvested young and still has an enzyme that reacts with oxygen during the pickling process, which is why it turns pink. Most places dye it pink with food coloring, but the stuff we made was all natural.

    There you have it. It makes sense why someone like Alter wouldn't make it at home. It was about 20 hours worth of work, although most of that work is relatively easy, just spent skimming the stock. But when I'm somewhere that has good ramen, I wouldn't make it at home. It's so cheap and so good out. However, it is possible to make at home and this turned out really well.
     
  16. Alter

    Alter Senior member

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    Tonight, we made ramen. Tonkotsu, to be exact.


    Nice work, Kwilk!! And many thanks for the pictorial. Everything looks great but you really want that egg to be more runny...6 to 7 minutes is best.

    I had a tonkotsu with some pork belly in it recently that was sublime.
     
  17. kwilkinson

    kwilkinson Senior member

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    Chicago
    Nice work, Kwilk!! And many thanks for the pictorial. Everything looks great but you really want that egg to be more runny...6 to 7 minutes is best.
    I know. [​IMG] My stupid mistake. I don't cook very often at home, and the way we do it at work is 8 minutes boiling, 8 minutes no heat, then ice bath. So when I did the 8 minutes boiling and then turned the stove off, the electric range took too long to cool down and overcooked them. Doh.

    Whenever I've had tonkotsu it has had pork belly or pork loin. Obviously, I enjoy the belly more [​IMG] . I have some pork belly. Should have made it, but didn't want to add another braise on top of what I was already doing.

    I bet a 63 degree egg on top of ramen would be incredible.
     
  18. DNW

    DNW Senior member

    Messages:
    10,526
    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2006
    Location:
    Recession, Baby
    Tonight, we made ramen. Tonkotsu, to be exact.

    The process takes about a day and a half, unless you're one of those people who always has some kind of stock on hand. Yesterday morning, I got the pork stock started.
    I chose trotters for the initial stock b/c they have such great gelatinous quality. So much collagen. Maybe a more traditional French food guy like SField, Manton, or Matt would hate me for it, but I like to use them in stock.
    In this initial stock goes pork trotters (not roasted), water, onion, garlic, leek, ginger peel, and konbu. I let this summer for about 10 hours to get a pretty good white pork stock.

    Trotters:
    [​IMG]

    Veg:
    [​IMG]

    Stock going:
    [​IMG]

    It turns out pretty nicely.
    [​IMG]

    Then, I let that cool and put it in the fridge. This morning, I roasted off pork shanks-- chose shanks because I wanted the really great flavor and didn't need to add a whole lot of body for the secondary stock.

    Shanks:
    [​IMG]

    The stock obviously needs skimmed the entire time it is going. After about 8 hours with the shanks, it has great body and great pork flavor. I start to turn it from a stock into a ramen broth by adding some green onion bottoms and more ginger peel, and at this point I begin to salt it.
    [​IMG]

    That's basically it. Plate it with the noodles first, and then whatever you want with it. This time, I chose hard-boiled eggs, some japanese spice mix, green onion, pickled ginger, and a dot of sriracha. The dish needs a lot of work to become more visually appealing, but the flavor honestly just could not be any better.
    [​IMG]



    Oh, and here's a shot of the ginger used for pickled ginger:
    [​IMG]

    It is harvested young and still has an enzyme that reacts with oxygen during the pickling process, which is why it turns pink. Most places dye it pink with food coloring, but the stuff we made was all natural.

    There you have it. It makes sense why someone like Alter wouldn't make it at home. It was about 20 hours worth of work, although most of that work is relatively easy, just spent skimming the stock. But when I'm somewhere that has good ramen, I wouldn't make it at home. It's so cheap and so good out. However, it is possible to make at home and this turned out really well.


    Looking good, chef. But WTF is this "japanese spice mix" you speak of? If the stock is delicious, why do you need to add a spice mix to it?
     
  19. melwoesblvd

    melwoesblvd Senior member

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    Sep 29, 2009
    had some chin ma-ya ramen yesterday, that stuff is amazing.
     
  20. kwilkinson

    kwilkinson Senior member

    Messages:
    33,650
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    Nov 21, 2007
    Location:
    Chicago
    Looking good, chef. But WTF is this "japanese spice mix" you speak of? If the stock is delicious, why do you need to add a spice mix to it?

    I added the mix b/c it tasted good? I don't know. It was just like adding sriracha. Just some heat. It's basically Shichimi tōgarashi
    It was this crap:
    [​IMG]


    I see this product at most ramen houses around here.
     

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