1. And... we're back. You'll notice that all of your images are back as well, as are our beloved emoticons, including the infamous :foo: We have also worked with our server folks and developers to fix the issues that were slowing down the site.

    There is still work to be done - the images in existing sigs are not yet linked, for example, and we are working on a way to get the images to load faster - which will improve the performance of the site, especially on the pages with a ton of images, and we will continue to work diligently on that and keep you updated.

    Cheers,

    Fok on behalf of the entire Styleforum team
    Dismiss Notice

What did you eat last night for dinner?

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by Fabienne, Jan 31, 2005.

  1. erictheobscure

    erictheobscure Senior member

    Messages:
    5,291
    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2008
    There are lots of arguments about taste--we're having one here. There are also some good ways to argue about taste as well as bad ways.
     
  2. Piobaire

    Piobaire Senior member

    Messages:
    50,191
    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2006
    Location:
    In My Douchemobile
    

    I don't think talking about there being both taste and textual differences is without merit. We all know different cooking techniques will cause different chemical reactions, or different levels and combos of said reactions, and hence different flavours. I took issue with a couple of specific things and the thought he is giving us "empirical evidence" that is somehow definitive.
     
  3. Bounder

    Bounder Senior member

    Messages:
    2,247
    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2009
    

    empirical em·pir·i·cal (ěm-pēr'ĭ-kəl) adj.: Based on, concerned with, or verifiable by observation or experience rather than theory or pure logic.

    :confused:


    I've been having a sense of deja vu for a while now. As it turns out, we had this exact conversation before. Except that, back then, you sort of agreed with me.

    http://www.styleforum.net/t/286215/the-sous-vide-thread/240#post_7834748

    http://www.styleforum.net/t/286215/the-sous-vide-thread/240#post_7836427

    So what changed? Why the suddenly vehement response?
     
  4. lawyerdad

    lawyerdad Senior member

    Messages:
    21,814
    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2006
  5. Piobaire

    Piobaire Senior member

    Messages:
    50,191
    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2006
    Location:
    In My Douchemobile
    

    As I said, not all sense data is valuable in...wait for it...the scientific method (which is what you were telling us we know nothing about.) "Verifiable by observation" conveys that we, or hundreds of people, would verify the same thing. If we all watched water begin to boil at 212F at sea level, and we repeated the multiple times, this empirical observation can lead to the conclusion water boils at 212F at sea level. If hundreds of people take a bite of a sous vide steak there are going to be hundreds of different opinions. See the difference?



    The conversation there was somewhat different.
     
    Last edited: Apr 3, 2017
  6. romafan

    romafan Senior member

    Messages:
    8,916
    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2004
    Location:
    NYC
  7. Bounder

    Bounder Senior member

    Messages:
    2,247
    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2009

    I'm sorry, but that is simply false. All measurements are subject to error. Your tongue, nose and brain are just a measurement device like any other. It may be more or less accurate than a gas chromatograph but that's neither here nor there. Each takes measurements and each has an "error rate." (More of an error distribution, actually, but let's not complicate things.)


    If you have hundreds of people take a bite of a sous vide steak and ask them specific questions about it, you are going to get a distribution of responses. Maybe the responses will be normally-distributed. If so, that tells you one thing. Maybe they will have some other distribution. That tells you something else e.g., that you are dealing with separate populations. If, for example, you tried this with sous vide brussels sprouts, you might get a very odd distribution because some people have a genetic mutation which makes them taste extra-disgusting.

    In any event, there is nothing, in principle, that would prevent you from doing a side-by-side taste test, asking specific questions and getting reliable data. Food companies do this all day, every day. Do you prefer Coke or Pepsi? Note that this has nothing to do with "good" or "bad". But reliable preferences certainly can -- and do -- emerge.

    To take a silly example, suppose you asked a thousand people to do a side-by-side taste test and tell you if Pepsi was sweeter than, say, vinegar. I think you would get a pretty solid, reliable, and reproducible result. You would also get a reliable and reproducible result if you asked people to compare Coke and Pepsi. Note that the result might be that 1/3 of the people thought there was no difference, 1/3 thought Coke was sweeter and 1/3 thought Pepsi was sweeter. But that is still a reliable, reproducible result that allows you to draw a conclusion.

    To take a semi-related example, dogs are trained to sniff for explosives, drugs, etc. Sometimes, when these dogs alert, they are wrong. They made a measurement error. Nonetheless, whenever one of these dogs alerts, it is a meaningful data point. If you wanted to do a study to determine what percentage of luggage contained, say, pot, you could have these dogs sniff 10,000 suitcases and conclude that there was a 95% probability that somewhere from 7-11% (or whatever) of suitcases contain pot.

    By the same token, you could ask 1000 people to do a side-by-side comparison of sous vide vs. dry-cooked steaks and ask them questions about their experience. You would get set of reproducible results that would tell you something about either the population, difference in sous vide and dry-cooked steaks, or both.

    Once again, I apologize for hijacking this thread. But it's all down to my New Year's resolution. I'm like this at dinner parties now, too.



    You can say that again.
     
  8. b1os

    b1os Senior member

    Messages:
    9,448
    Joined:
    May 25, 2011
    Location:
    Berlin/Hamburg
  9. jcman311

    jcman311 Senior member

    Messages:
    2,390
    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2015
    Location:
    Big Whisky
    I too can pick and choose definitions

    Quote:
     
  10. Bounder

    Bounder Senior member

    Messages:
    2,247
    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2009
    Not a fan. Call me old school.
     
  11. mgm9128

    mgm9128 Senior member

    Messages:
    5,962
    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2011
    ...
     
    Last edited: Apr 3, 2017
    1 person likes this.
  12. binge

    binge Senior member

    Messages:
    5,210
    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2008
    Location:
    San Francisco
    Pan-fried snapper with corn, tomato, black bean and pepper salad.

    [​IMG]
     
    1 person likes this.
  13. The Ernesto

    The Ernesto Senior member

    Messages:
    3,471
    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2010
    I baked some salmon the other night marinated in soy, honey, lemon juice and ginger.

    Was nice and juicy but skin didn't crisp up. Should have started at a high temp.
     
  14. mgm9128

    mgm9128 Senior member

    Messages:
    5,962
    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2011
    [​IMG]
     
    2 people like this.
  15. mgm9128

    mgm9128 Senior member

    Messages:
    5,962
    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2011
    Damn fine meat pie. Not sure if sous vide or not.
    [​IMG]
     
    5 people like this.
  16. SirReveller

    SirReveller Senior member

    Messages:
    2,956
    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2015
    Location:
    Nakatomi Plaza
    This guy...this guy eats.
     
  17. Geoffrey Firmin

    Geoffrey Firmin Senior member

    Messages:
    4,995
    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2010
    Location:
    South West of the Black Stump
    

    Possum or Mary's little lamb?
     
  18. Piobaire

    Piobaire Senior member

    Messages:
    50,191
    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2006
    Location:
    In My Douchemobile
    

    How's the meaty flavour? That should tell you.
     
    1 person likes this.
  19. mgm9128

    mgm9128 Senior member

    Messages:
    5,962
    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2011
    

    Lamb shank, $6.90 NZD
     
  20. Geoffrey Firmin

    Geoffrey Firmin Senior member

    Messages:
    4,995
    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2010
    Location:
    South West of the Black Stump
    

    Sigh I used to buy lamb shanks for 90c each to feed the dog. Mongrel wouldn't touch them raw. So I had to pan sear them in garlic. Now there (thanks Jamie) considered a gourmet delight at around $16 a kilo.
     

Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by