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What did you eat last night for dinner?

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by Fabienne, Jan 31, 2005.

  1. Bounder

    Bounder Senior member

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    BTW, it just isn't true that I dislike sous vide. I think it is brilliant for some things. If you have not tried a chuck roast, you really should. A tender, medium rare chuck roast was literally impossible to produce before sous vide.

    Why, just last night I tried doing some sous vide popcorn. I gave it 6 hours at 190F and I put half a teaspoon of truffle oil in the bag with the kernels. I thought it came out pretty well. The truffle oil added a lot of flavor and the popped corn came out noticeable larger than normal, I guess because of the vacuum.

    [​IMG]

    The consistency seemed about the same as microwave popcorn, which I often burn trying to get the last kernels to pop. That's something you don't have to worry about with sous vide, so I guess that's an advantage. All all in all, a worthy experiment.
     
  2. Piobaire

    Piobaire Senior member

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    Okay, this is fucking hilarious.
     
    Last edited: Apr 1, 2017
    1 person likes this.
  3. jcman311

    jcman311 Senior member

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    Except that food science is a completely subjective thing. Yes, it uses the scientific method but testing is done usually to a double blind food panel. Many of these tasters have specifically trained senses and they are kept isolated from light, smell, sound, etc while testing. Hence my call for impartiality. You stating that you have an empirical observation means nothing to me if your sense of smell, flavor, taste is off. (not saying that it is)

    You are entitled to your opinion. Setting up tests just will not draw any great conclusions because everyone here already has a bias.
     
    2 people like this.
  4. Piobaire

    Piobaire Senior member

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    And just because something is sense data does not mean it's a valid or useful "empirical observation."

    But apparently I know fuck all about the scientific method so don't pay me any attention. I will tell you that empirically I prefer blue over red so QED.
     
  5. rnoldh

    rnoldh Senior member

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    Damn, we have racists, sexists, homophobes, islamophobes, xenophobes, and now foodists.
     
  6. erictheobscure

    erictheobscure Senior member

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    don't be too disappointed--5/6 is still a pretty good score for you
     
  7. rnoldh

    rnoldh Senior member

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    It could be worse.

    I could be like you.
     
  8. mgm9128

    mgm9128 Senior member

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    Proper fish and chips, monkfish, salt and vinegar. Ketchup cost an extra dollar.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
    4 people like this.
  9. Manton

    Manton Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    that seems morally wrong
     
  10. Piobaire

    Piobaire Senior member

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    Made bacon this morning. Mrs. Piob brought home some locally raised eggs on Friday and we had some real nice pasta in the pantry. This of course means carbonara.

    [​IMG]
     
    5 people like this.
  11. mgm9128

    mgm9128 Senior member

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    New Zealand dollar, works to be 70 US cents.

    I'll jump out of a plane in a few hours.
     
    Last edited: Apr 2, 2017
  12. SirReveller

    SirReveller Senior member

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  13. mgm9128

    mgm9128 Senior member

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    Fergburer
    [​IMG]
     
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  14. tropics

    tropics Senior member

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    queenstown? i spent a winter surviving on mainly the lamb burger.
     
  15. mgm9128

    mgm9128 Senior member

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    Ya. Hell of a town.
     
  16. Bounder

    Bounder Senior member

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    Normally I wouldn't correct this but I have become more argumentative since irrational morons started taking over the world. I do not mean to suggest that you are one of these, but faulty reasoning is faulty reasoning.

    Food science is not a "completely subjective thing." How do you think food companies design new products? "I like A more than B" is subjective. "A is sweeter than B" is objective. "More people like A better than B" is objective.

    The question I am asking is not "Do you like the sous vide beef better than 'dry cooked' beef?" The question is, essentially, "Does sous vide beef taste different than 'dry cooked' beef'?" This is an objective question and it doesn't require tasters with "specifically trained senses." In fact, the easier it is for an untrained palate to detect, the bigger the difference in flavor.

    Not to mention that we are not trying to win the Nobel prize in Cooking. We're having a discussion on a message board. People regularly compare the differences in, say, Italian vs. British tailoring. To have an informed opinion about this, you have to commission 11 suits from an Italian tailor and then 11 suits from a British tailor. This is a lot more complicated and expensive that cutting a tri-tip in half.



    I have nothing to offer in a discussion of whether you prefer blue over red. But I am perfectly competent to argue whether something is brighter blue or darker blue.
     
  17. Piobaire

    Piobaire Senior member

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    False equivalency.

    Just let it go.
     
  18. brokencycle

    brokencycle Senior member

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    Maybe I'm not an expert on food science, but why do some things taste sweeter to some people? I mean i can taste two things and my wife can taste two things and we reach a different conclusion on which is sweeter.

    Another example is heat from non-peppers. There is no objective scale to measure the heat of horseradish.
     
  19. erictheobscure

    erictheobscure Senior member

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    I love this conversation (0). It's a fun reminder that (gustatory) taste still resists Kant's attempt to systematize aesthetic judgment (to shift from the supposedly crude application of gustatory taste toward a model of aesthetic judgment). And that Kant tends to forget about gustatory taste--applying it as a case for the stubbornness of individual perception/judgment--as he strives toward a mode of dynamic agreement.

    The tl;dr upshot being: if we can't agree on what tastes better, no wonder we can't agree on other shit, even in or after an age of supposed rationality. Leave it to a German virgin who never traveled anywhere to think that the question of taste could be surmounted by systematic judgment proving some workable model of intersubjective consensus.
     
    Last edited: Apr 3, 2017
    1 person likes this.
  20. Piobaire

    Piobaire Senior member

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    [​IMG]



    It started off as "diluted" and the "meaty flavour" being a "weak imitation." From there, of course, it eventually morphed from "diluted" to dryer!

    Seriously, over tastes there can be no arguments...unless, of course, you manufacture one.
     
    Last edited: Apr 3, 2017

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