What did you eat last night for dinner?

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by Fabienne, Jan 31, 2005.

  1. drizzt3117

    drizzt3117 Senior member

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    Interesting pairing for the Rieussec, how did that turn out? I normally pair Sauternes with either a foie gras, cheese, or dessert course, I've never seen it paired with phyllo...
     


  2. cuffthis

    cuffthis Senior member

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    It turned out quite well, although I know it's almost a sin to have 100 point Sauternes at so early in its life. Last year, we had a 1921 Barsac with foie gras at the start of the meal, which was stunning (both the food and the wine). But the chef strongly advised us against the foie gras at the start of the meal. He was afraid that it's richness would make people feel too full for the remaining 8 courses.
     


  3. drizzt3117

    drizzt3117 Senior member

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    I have had the 2001 Rieussec and Climens a few times since release, and love them both. I can only imagine what they will be like in 10-20 years. Supposedly the 2001 d'Yquem is the best wine that several reviewers have EVER tasted, so we'll have to see how that is rated when Climens and Rieussec are both 100 points [​IMG]
     


  4. johnw86

    johnw86 Senior member

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    Ah, the easiest way possible. Picked up some frozen lobster bisque (available in most of the markets around here) and poured it on the salmon. It made a great sauce with a minimum effort.
     


  5. Fabienne

    Fabienne Senior member

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    (Fabienne @ Mar. 07 2005,06:26) How did you make the lobster bisque sauce? Â
    Ah, the easiest way possible. Â Picked up some frozen lobster bisque (available in most of the markets around here) and poured it on the salmon. Â It made a great sauce with a minimum effort.
    It does take about 2 hours to make a lobster bisque, so I understand the shortcut. I saw a lobster bisque in the refrigerated section of Trader Joe's. Maybe I'll try it.
     


  6. Fabienne

    Fabienne Senior member

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    Typically, the appetizer portions are very manageable (terrine or seared).
     


  7. philosophe

    philosophe Senior member

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    Orrechiette pasta with leeks sauteed in olive oil, dinosaur kale (leaves and stems chopped and braised with the leeks), walnuts and the most fabulous aged pecorino I've ever tasted (thanks DiBruno's House of Cheese in south Philly). We drank an inexpensive white bordeaux called "Entre deux mers" to match the sheep cheese. this dish is also good with an aged parmesan and verdicchio instead of bordeaux.

    In honor of today's blizzard, i am cooking lamb shanks tonight.
     


  8. PHV

    PHV Senior member

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    How much is a case of d'Yquem, from 2001, for instance? I'm looking into finding a storage service and buying a few cases of various things to age for a quarter century, or at least until I have suitable space myself.
     


  9. drizzt3117

    drizzt3117 Senior member

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    2001 d'Yquem hasn't been released to the public yet, but it's expected to be released at north of $400/btl. I'd budget $5-7k for a case, and it's supposed to be released in winter 2005-2006.

    As previously mentioned, 2001 Rieussec ($125-150/btl) and 2001 Climens ($150-200/btl) are both 100 point rated wines as well. As I haven't tasted the d'Yquem, I couldn't comment on how they match up, but I don't think you could go wrong with any of these wines. Sauternes producers claim that the 2001 vintage may be the best vintage EVER.
     


  10. PHV

    PHV Senior member

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    I've only been able to find 750ml bottles of '99 so far.
     


  11. drizzt3117

    drizzt3117 Senior member

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    The '99 isn't very good, I wouldn't be a buyer, especially at the $100+ that it's usually selling for. Most vintages of d'Yquem are good, but not all of them are great. I would look at the 87 88 89 and 90 vintages, they can usually be found for about $300/750ml and are all 96+ point vintages. IMO 89 and 90 are 100 pt worthy, although most people think the 2001 will be better given time.
     


  12. PHV

    PHV Senior member

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    such Burgundys are usually meant to be kept for 30 years, right?

    When I graduated, I believe the bottles of d'Yquem we opened were from '68? It wasn't until then that I really appreciated what a fantastic wine is. Unfortunately I'd been quite ignorant of "whites" and never appreciated them as much as their darker counterparts, until then. (I'm really in the learning phase, relatively speaking I'm a rookie). Such a shame, given where I live (Niagara Region), where there is some fantastic white wine being produced.

    The following evening I was also treated with a magnum of Mouton de Rothschild from the late thirties. Which leads me to my next question;

    have you found that the Riedel glasses, specifically the Sommeliers, enhance the tasting experience of a Bordeaux? The concept somewhat escapes me, although I've only given them a cursory glance. I'm pretty sure that such fine vintages would excite me just as much out of a coffee thermos... I didn't really get the whole idea, and I don't recall there being any difference between taking a fine Bordeaux from a more traditional Rosenthal glass without the special lip like the Ridel.

    Could you shed some light on this?
     


  13. drizzt3117

    drizzt3117 Senior member

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    (drizzt3117 @ Mar. 08 2005,23:21) The '99 isn't very good, I wouldn't be a buyer, especially at the $100+ that it's usually selling for. Most vintages of d'Yquem are good, but not all of them are great. I would look at the 87 88 89 and 90 vintages, they can usually be found for about $300/750ml and are all 96+ point vintages. IMO 89 and 90 are 100 pt worthy, although most people think the 2001 will be better given time.
    such Burgundys are usually meant to be kept for 30 years, right? When I graduated, I believe the bottles of d'Yquem we opened were from '68? It wasn't until then that I really appreciated what a fantastic wine is. Unfortunately I'd been quite ignorant of "whites" and never appreciated them as much as their darker counterparts, until then. (I'm really in the learning phase, relatively speaking I'm a rookie). The following evening I was also treated with a magnum of Mouton de Rothschild from the late thirties. Which leads me to my next question; have you found that the Riedel glasses, specifically the Sommeliers, enhance the tasting experience of a Bordeaux? The concept somewhat escapes me, although I've only given them a cursory glance. I'm pretty sure that such fine vintages would excite me just as much out of a coffee thermos... I didn't really get the whole idea, and I don't recall there being any difference between taking a fine Bordeaux from a more traditional Rosenthal glass without the special lip like the Ridel. Could you shed some light on this?
    d'Yquem is a Bordeaux (albeit a white one, a Sauternes), and it is meant to be cellared, but Sauternes is one of the few wines that is enjoyable young and old, unlike its red brethren from the Bordeaux. I would recommend checking out ones with a little bottle age on them. I've had a '29 d'Yquem, and my uncle has a bottle of '00 d'Yquem that I have my eye on... maybe he will crack it at his upcoming 50th birthday party [​IMG] www.winex.com has some decent deals on d'Yquem, including the 2003 futures, which are going to be excellent. Some people think 2003 may be close to as good as 2001, which would make it as good as 88, 89, etc. $234/btl for the 2003 futures is a good price IMO, I have a case on order, who knows when it will arrive though. I think the Riedels are going to enhance the taste a bit, they also make it easier to get the nose of the wine, and the olfactory part of the experience is at least as important as the taste, which you won't get a lot out of w/o smell.
     


  14. PHV

    PHV Senior member

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    Originally Posted by PHV,Mar. 08 2005,23:32
    The '99 isn't very good, I wouldn't be a buyer, especially at the $100+ that it's usually selling for. Â Most vintages of d'Yquem are good, but not all of them are great. Â I would look at the 87 88 89 and 90 vintages, they can usually be found for about $300/750ml and are all 96+ point vintages. Â IMO 89 and 90 are 100 pt worthy, although most people think the 2001 will be better given time.
    such Burgundys are usually meant to be kept for 30 years, right? When I graduated, I believe the bottles of d'Yquem we opened were from '68? It wasn't until then that I really appreciated what a fantastic wine is. Unfortunately I'd been quite ignorant of "whites" and never appreciated them as much as their darker counterparts, until then. (I'm really in the learning phase, relatively speaking I'm a rookie). The following evening I was also treated with a magnum of Mouton de Rothschild from the late thirties. Which leads me to my next question; have you found that the Riedel glasses, specifically the Sommeliers, enhance the tasting experience of a Bordeaux? The concept somewhat escapes me, although I've only given them a cursory glance. I'm pretty sure that such fine vintages would excite me just as much out of a coffee thermos... I didn't really get the whole idea, and I don't recall there being any difference between taking a fine Bordeaux from a more traditional Rosenthal glass without the special lip like the Ridel. Could you shed some light on this?

    d'Yquem is a Bordeaux (albeit a white one, a Sauternes), and it is meant to be cellared, but Sauternes is one of the few wines that is enjoyable young and old, unlike its red brethren from the Bordeaux. Â I would recommend checking out ones with a little bottle age on them. Â I've had a '29 d'Yquem, and my uncle has a bottle of '00 d'Yquem that I have my eye on... maybe he will crack it at his upcoming 50th birthday party [​IMG] www.winex.com has some decent deals on d'Yquem, including the 2003 futures, which are going to be excellent. Â Some people think 2003 may be close to as good as 2001, which would make it as good as 88, 89, etc. Â $234/btl for the 2003 futures is a good price IMO, I have a case on order, who knows when it will arrive though. I think the Riedels are going to enhance the taste a bit, they also make it easier to get the nose of the wine, and the olfactory part of the experience is at least as important as the taste, which you won't get a lot out of w/o smell.
    Shows how much I know. I frequently make slips of getting the obvious mixed up. Yesterday I quite embarrasingly wrote down Chopin when it the piece was by Saint Seans (had fun explaining that to promotions, I don't think there is even any violin rep by Chopin). I get things in my head and have a bad habit of writing before thinking. Â Maybe I'll pay more attention when I have the Riedels in front of me when I'm back home, but up here where I'm at I just have traditional crystal. Also, when ordering older vintages, how many bad bottles have you gotten? My parents had to discard half a case of Kannonkop (a passable South African wine) from many years ago, and they came bad, but because my grandparents brought it with them and put it right in the cellar, we never checked. What is the usual policy on those mishaps? Is it done at one's own risks?
     


  15. drizzt3117

    drizzt3117 Senior member

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    About 3-5% of all wines will be bad upon release, due to cork failure or taint, generally, but a more serious issue is heat damage or improper storage. Provenance is very important when it comes to older wines, so that's why it's a lot easier to buy on release and cellar your own wines. Purchasing older vintages from sources that you haven't dealt with in the past is going to be risky.
     


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