What are you reading?

Discussion in 'Entertainment, Culture, and Sports' started by chorse123, Mar 13, 2006.

  1. Lionel Hutz

    Lionel Hutz Senior member

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    of perhaps a more reputable secondary source
     


  2. erictheobscure

    erictheobscure Senior member

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    I'm pretty sure my line of work wins the "takes the fun out of reading" competition.
     


  3. wojt

    wojt Senior member

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    [​IMG]

    reading it again
     


  4. buy a painting

    buy a painting Well-Known Member

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    Older I get more I gravitate to the Hellenistic writers (stoa and scepticism). During younger years I found them boring. Funny how can that change.
     


  5. noob in 89

    noob in 89 Senior member

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    Have you read his other...type...of stuff? It seems he writes at least two kinds of novels. I thought Child of God and The Road had some excellent prose, but were also much swifter and less Cliff Note-y than some of his others. I really enjoy dense, flowery writing, but couldn't get into most of his border trilogy for whatever reason...
     


  6. Lionel Hutz

    Lionel Hutz Senior member

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    May I ask what you do? I am trying to imagine the worst professions for reading . . . . as a corporate lawyer I have to carefully read a great deal at work so I don't read as actively as I once did

    I am going to guess you are a copy editor, journalist or you edit or read submissions at a publishing house
     


  7. Lionel Hutz

    Lionel Hutz Senior member

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    It is funny I read "no country for old men" and felt like I was re-watching the movie . . . . I hope mccarthy got the screenplay credit because I don't think the Coen bros changed a thing . . . . read The Road and it was enjoyable but I found the narrative style of that book quite grating

    I guess I need to load child of god onto the kindle
     


  8. Geoffrey Firmin

    Geoffrey Firmin Senior member

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    While not of the period this is one of the best contemporary books I've read on Stoicism. A Guide to the Good Life; The Ancient Art of Stoic Joy by William B.Irvine
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  9. crdb

    crdb Senior member

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    When I used to study music, I found theory extraordinarily dull. In fact, I passed my harmony exercises by mass-listening to Bach chorales, absorbing the idiom, and instinctively writing what I thought sounded right, which usually did the job.

    One and a half decades later, many years without performing or thinking much about music again bringing sufficient distance, and without the pressure of results or deadlines, I find myself savouring the thoughts of great names (and, for that matter, "famous literature" like Kipling or Joseph Conrad).

    This week's read is Schoenberg's Harmonielehre (Theory of Harmony, in the English translation). Schoenberg is unjustly infamous for the trail of destruction he laid upon 20th century composition, as far as most ears (and academic music departments) are concerned. He was a phenomenal composer, which even a casual listener can verify with his earlier works (Verklarte Nacht, the first string quartet...) before he seeded the dissonant era. Harmonielehre is not really a textbook, it is more of a giant rambling set of thoughts on music in the general shape of a textbook. Now rambling can be terrible, if it comes from a dull mind; it can be a phenomenal way to get more colour and depth, when from a brilliant one, and Schoenberg definitely fits the latter case. I'm not sure the book would be particularly enjoyable to someone without at least a passing interest in music, but if you attend the symphony and can read notes, it will probably be worth a try.

    Also open this week is Eumenes of Cardia: a Greek amongst Macedonians by Dr. Edward Anson, which is an extended edition of his doctoral thesis. Alexander the Great's Macedonia was a phenomenally interesting time for a variety of reasons (for example, the departure from ethnocentrism as a pillar for success) and Eumenes, his private secretary was responsible for much of it. The book is structured like an academic work, beginning with a discussion of sources and a lay of the land. Nevertheless I find it more approachable than the original sources, and giving welcome context.

    On a lighter note I finally got round to reading Kipling's early short stories. For the first time in years, a written work had me laugh out loud and you can find here (Pig, from Plain Tales of the Hill). Some degree of familiarity with large organisations is a prerequisite for savouring this particular tale, which echoes many real life experiences.
     


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