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What are you reading?

Discussion in 'Entertainment, Culture, and Sports' started by chorse123, Mar 13, 2006.

  1. The Ernesto

    The Ernesto Well-Known Member

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    :)

    All you need in life is an interesting woman to read.
     
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2015
    1 person likes this.
  2. JFST

    JFST Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Roma, anno '57

    Quote:
    Agreed!
     
  3. Geoffrey Firmin

    Geoffrey Firmin Well-Known Member

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    South West of the Black Stump
    

    ee cummings said it all

    somewhere i have never travelled, gladly beyond
    any experience,your eyes have their silence:
    in your most frail gesture are things which enclose me,
    or which i cannot touch because they are too near

    your slightest look easily will unclose me
    though i have closed myself as fingers,
    you open always petal by petal myself as Spring opens
    (touching skilfully,mysteriously)her first rose

    or if your wish be to close me, i and
    my life will shut very beautifully ,suddenly,
    as when the heart of this flower imagines
    the snow carefully everywhere descending;

    nothing which we are to perceive in this world equals
    the power of your intense fragility:whose texture
    compels me with the color of its countries,
    rendering death and forever with each breathing

    (i do not know what it is about you that closes
    and opens;only something in me understands
    the voice of your eyes is deeper than all roses)
    nobody,not even the rain,has such small hand's
     
    1 person likes this.
  4. Tried and True

    Tried and True Well-Known Member

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    ^

    Probably inspired by Anne Barton, one of Cummings' quick reads.
     
    1 person likes this.
  5. Ryan Holden

    Ryan Holden Active Member

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    "The Way of The Seal" Mark Divine
     
  6. Hombre Secreto

    Hombre Secreto Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Lost Angeles
  7. SirReveller

    SirReveller Well-Known Member

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    Slash's autobio titled appropriately...Slash

    I'd listen to a mix primarily alternating Zeppelin and Phil Collins before I put much GnR on there but..surprisingly fun read. Besides the obv fun debauchery tales the rising up to superstar status from nothing is cool.
     
  8. KamoteJoe

    KamoteJoe Well-Known Member

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    I really enjoyed reading the Idiot for the first time. I'd probably rank it as my second favorite among Dostoevsky's works after the Brothers K. Now, unto this.
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Aug 2, 2015
  9. SirReveller

    SirReveller Well-Known Member

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    Have you read Lolita yet?
     
  10. KamoteJoe

    KamoteJoe Well-Known Member

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    I've only seen the Kubrick film adaptation but I'm hoping to get into that eventually.
     
  11. SirReveller

    SirReveller Well-Known Member

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    Nice. It's surprisingly humorous.

    I have Idiot and Bros K. sitting on the shelf for years. I've read a bunch of the other Russians but these two still await. Someone once said to me Bros. K. was "the best book I've ever read" so it's due up first. IMO you need a good dedicated vacay by a pool to read these "heavies" best though.
     
  12. indesertum

    indesertum Well-Known Member

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    i've been meaning to read this and pale fire did you know nabokov thought dostoevsky was trash? he said the only reason why americans thought dostoevsky was a great artist was because they were so used to trash novels that lesser foreign trash like dostoevsky seemed like art.
     
    1 person likes this.
  13. Tried and True

    Tried and True Well-Known Member

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    Nabokov
    He thought Lolita was trash at one point. He had to be talked out of setting a match to it.
     
  14. indesertum

    indesertum Well-Known Member

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    it wasn't a match. it was his backyard incinerator. and it wasn't cuz he thought it was trash. after he'd done his research he had doubts about the idea and had trouble expressing what he wanted.

    that's besides the point tho. nabokov was very opinionated and thought a lot of writers were trash including balzac, camus, sartre, chekhov, hemingway, but by far two of his most hated writers was dostoevsky and gogol. already talked about dostoevsky but to describe gogol he made up the word poshlust (post + lust) to talk about how he's not obviously trashy but falsely beautiful/important. he actually taught gogol in his class as an example of how shitty writing can be. gogol even inspired him and a lot of his later writings have poshlust characters as a counter point to the main hero/ines.

    it's amusing that when english speakers talk about russian novelists they always include dostoevsky and gogol and nabokov (he loved tyutchin, pushkin, and tolstoy tho. reading pushkin makes you really want to learn russian)
     
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2015
  15. eluther

    eluther Well-Known Member

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    If a conversation about Russian writers (from an Occidental) that doesn't include Mikhail Bulgakov isn't something I trust.
     
    1 person likes this.
  16. noob in 89

    noob in 89 Well-Known Member

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    Wow, is that from Strong Opinions? I love that book. I found this aspect of Nabokov (or of his generation) very refreshing. Authors had opinions of other authors, other art, and they shared them, and it was amazing, giving you, the reader, a real sense of how the novel progressed along its many branches, built sometimes atop a razing of the past. But not so anymore. It seems that if writers do have opinions, they are usually withheld. And you have to wonder what kind of mark that will leave when emerging novelists have learned to embrace every shot from the canon.

    Anyway: That's pretty neat! I read Strong Opinions because it was repped here. (Yay here!)

    .​
     
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2015
    2 people like this.
  17. SirReveller

    SirReveller Well-Known Member

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    Shieeet @indesertum really knows his Russians!

    I believe when Tolstoy got old he went a little nuts and publicly denounced his own books
     
  18. lawyerdad

    lawyerdad Well-Known Member

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    Gogol's fun.
    For what it's worth, Nabokov would have rejected the description of him as a "Russian writer".
    Pale Fire > Lolita or The Gift, although I enjoyed both of those as well (probably have to re-read The Gift, though, because I don't remember it well.
     
  19. indesertum

    indesertum Well-Known Member

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    Cuz he's ukranian? But he lived back when it was still the Russian empire right? I guess ethnically ukranian but nationality-wise Russian?

    I don't know my Russians. I just know a little about Nabokov.

    I remember before I started reading Strong Opinions I had big doubts about whether it would even be fun cuz it's just interviews and letters and stuff but he's such an interesting person it turned out to be really fun.

    It's hard to critically think about and form opinions about famous writers because they're so respected and held up as the greats. we read them and read about them since middle school. it's almost like how you see your parents as a kid vs how you see your parents as an adult. Nabokov trashing some and praising others kind of opened my eyes

    I'm going to go buy pale fire now. Cuz Lolita was also one of my all time favorites (one of the handful books I've read multiple times). From what I've read about it, it reminds me of Borges particularly Tlon, Uqbar, Orbis, Tertius
     
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2015
  20. lawyerdad

    lawyerdad Well-Known Member

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    No, I think it was a combination of his conflicted feelings as an ex-pat and a commitment to his "Americanization" of himself once he came to the States. Once he did so he stopped writing in Russian and started writing in English, and he was (justifiably) proud of his mastery of the English language.

    "I am an American author, born in Russia, educated in England, where I studied French texts."
     
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