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What are you reading?

Discussion in 'Entertainment, Culture, and Sports' started by chorse123, Mar 13, 2006.

  1. imatlas

    imatlas Senior member

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  2. Connemara

    Connemara Senior member

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    I almost bought that once. I'll take a look when I get the chance.
    I received one of his books, Collapse, for Xmas.
     
  3. Joffrey

    Joffrey Senior member

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  4. epb

    epb Senior member

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    I'd disagree with them. I think big books are making something of a comeback because e-readers mean we don't have to haul them around. From what I've seen, lots are still cases like The Stand - modern writers don't seem to work collaboratively with editors as much anymore, so writing isn't as tight and polished. Franchise makers like King use their clout to push their work thru damn near untouched when most of the great writers in history had long, tempestuous but ultimately beneficial relationships with editors that helped sharpen their writing and shape their voices.

    Also, I don't think the big book is completely back, though I wish it were - everyone wants to write a series now, going for the slow grind payoff rather than the big onetime hit. I've read a few series that could have been one decent-sized book.
     
  5. watchcollector2454

    watchcollector2454 Senior member

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  6. seventiessister

    seventiessister Active Member

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    You have just got to read "The Forgotten Soldier" by Guy Sajer - its about the horror of war on the eastern front, its authobiographical, its brutal and very real.
     
    1 person likes this.
  7. watchcollector2454

    watchcollector2454 Senior member

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  8. GraphicNovelty

    GraphicNovelty Senior member

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    Finished
    [​IMG]

    Enjoyed it a lot!

    Started
    [​IMG]

    Also enjoying it a lot!
     
  9. oxfordamerican

    oxfordamerican Well-Known Member

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    Killing Rage by Eamon Collins

    A Rumor Of War by Philip Caputo

    Just started a really interesting book about The Bonus Army. Also picked up biographies of Duke Ellington, Johnny Cash, and Norman Mailer, as well as a history of Stax Records that I am eager to tear into when I get the time.
     
  10. JanC

    JanC Senior member

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    [​IMG]

    "A leading evolutionary psychologist probes the unconscious instincts behind American consumer culture

    Illuminating the hidden reasons for why we buy what we do, Spent applies evolutionary psychology to the sensual wonderland of marketing and perceived status that is American consumer culture. Geoffrey Miller starts with the theory that we purchase things to advertise ourselves to others, and then examines other factors that dictate what we spend money on. With humor and insight, Miller analyzes an array of product choices and deciphers what our decisions say about ourselves, giving us access to a new way of understanding-and improving-our behaviors to become happier consumers."
     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2014
  11. Nil

    Nil Senior member

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    Just finished A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man by Joyce. I found it excellent. As I've already enjoyed Dubliners, do I now dare to tackle Ulysses?
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2014
  12. oxfordamerican

    oxfordamerican Well-Known Member

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    As long as you know what you're getting into. Portrait and Dubliners are among Joyce's more accessible works, so if you're going into Ulysses expecting consistency, forget it. Ditto for Finnegan's Wake.
     
  13. Nil

    Nil Senior member

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    I fully expect to struggle and perhaps not even finish it this time. I'm viewing it as on of those long term projects, a few pages here and there and maybe read some critical analysis on the side to make sense of it all.

    But fuck Finnegan's Wake with a rusty spoon. I'd never subject myself to that. I broke up with a girl who claimed she loved Finnegan's Wake; not so much because I think it's an incomprehensible book, but because it proved her to be a liar.
     
  14. Big Pun

    Big Pun Senior member

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    Outer Dark by C McCarthy. Very enjoyable so far, just talks a while to become accustomed to the prose.
     
  15. YOLO EMSHI

    YOLO EMSHI Senior member

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    Been a very long time since I finished a book in a single sitting. If you're on a diet probs shouldn't read this book

    Now onto this:[​IMG]
     
  16. donjuan17

    donjuan17 Senior member

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  17. Nil

    Nil Senior member

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    Dead Souls by Nikolai Gogol. I'm going with the older Guerney translation.
     
  18. Connemara

    Connemara Senior member

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    Mortality by Christopher Hitchens. I found this to be very moving. The last chapter of the book is a collection of notes scribbled by Hitchens in his final days. You can see the germ of an idea for a new column in almost every short entry.

    Highly recommended.
     
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2014
    1 person likes this.
  19. marvin100

    marvin100 Senior member

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    Anne Carson, Nox. Read her Oresteia recently and was stunned. This is a thornier beast...

    [​IMG]
     
  20. lawyerdad

    lawyerdad Senior member

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    Orfeo by Richard Powers. I've enjoyed most of his stuff quite a bit. I like this one, but I'm fairly musically illiterate (I can read music a bit in the limited sense that I can see a note on the page and then laboriously find the corresponding key on a piano), but am not somebody who when reading a score or a detailed description of a piece of music can hear it in my head), and his increasing fascination with detailed descriptions of music as touchpoint and metaphor leaves me skimming a lot.
     
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2014

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