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What are You Drinking for Thanksgiving 2009?

munchausen

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I have an excellent Miller Lite '09 that will go well with the American Football contest I will be viewing.
 

ama

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Originally Posted by munchausen
I have an excellent Miller Lite '09 that will go well with the American Football contest I will be viewing.

Noob, the '08 vintage was much more flinty.
 

Thomas

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While cooking: Some Old Rasputin stout

Dinner: ah hell I don't know. nothing alcoholic

Once everyone's gone: bourbon. I'm not sure I'll even care which one.
 

hedgehog

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Large amounts of coffee, while studying for an exam. We don't have thanksgiving in Norway.
 

Huntsman

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Originally Posted by saint
Cranberry sauce/relish is definitely a wine killer. I usually wait until seconds on food or my third or fourth glass of wine before I put it on my plate. Coconut creme pie is great, but, as you suggest kind of difficult to pair. I'd try a PX sherry or, better a Bual or Malmsey Madeira, the acidity should cut through the creaminess of the pie, and if you're lucky it'll have some tropical fruit flavor to it that'll play off the coconut nicely.
Really a Gewurtz with a little sweetness does not get killed by the Cranberries. Awesome wine. Nice call on the Madeira, I have a beautiful Malmsey in the cellar.
Originally Posted by Thomas
Dinner: ah hell I don't know. nothing alcoholic
So sorry to hear. ~ H
 

Dragon

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I usually stick to Beaujolais for red and Riesling type wine for white. In general, I don`t think the other choices go well with a turkey dinner.

Champagne makes turkey taste dry
Chardonnay is often recommended but I don`t think it goes well with turkey dinner
Cabs are a bit overpowering
Pinot Noir is often recommended, but in my opinion it overpowers slightly

If you want to go with a fancy wine, I would open a nice, German Riesling. For red, there is really no reason to open something fancy. Beaujolais area wines are more enjoyable with the dinner than the other choices in my opinion. Maaaybe my Plan B would be a light Merlot or light Bordeaux wine with a high merlot blend.
 

gomestar

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The Zin and the Beaujolais Nouveau. Drank the Shiraz yesterday (pass)

 

Dragon

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Originally Posted by kwilkinson
There is always a reason to open a bottle of something fancy.


If you feel like splurging on a red for Thanksgiving dinner, spend an extra $10 on the Beaujolais and get one from the specific, quality growers. There`s no reason to get any more fancy than that, especially since it`s a better pairing than the others (for red). Even with Beaujolais, you don`t want to get too fancy, as those growers usually try to make their wines more like Burgundys. This is not a case of trying to get value or enjoy on a budget. It`s just that the more expensive choices don`t go well with Turkey or the trimmings.

If you still need a reason to open a fancy bottle, open the fancy Riesling. A $20 vs $200 Riesling can make a big difference (although the $20 ones are still pretty good).
 

justtemple

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I'm going to a wine bar later with a friend to enjoy a bottle of Flavium Crianza Mencia.
 

gomestar

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Originally Posted by Dragon
If you still need a reason to open a fancy bottle, open the fancy Riesling. A $20 vs $200 Riesling can make a big difference (although the $20 ones are still pretty good).

if you're dropping $200 no a Riesling, odds are you'll be picking up a Trockenbeerenauslese or a Beerenauslese. Stellar wines, no doubt, but high residual sugar that I think would be more suited as a dessert wine (as they usually are regardless of the meal). Also, you'll be dropping big coin for a 375 ml bottle.

For German riesling, I'd probably stick with Spätlese or Auslese, the former being a little dryer. It's easy to spend $35-70 in this category and pick up a sensational wine. I'd drink these with the actual meal and then leave the big guns for the dessert.
 

munchausen

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I ended up getting Paulaner Original, because hey, it's a special day.
 

aboutsomeoneelse

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Got a bottle of Martini & Rossi prosecco for the pre-game; probably enjoying a bottle of Menage a Trois 2008 during the festivities, and at least a bottle or two of 2° Below (New Belgium's winter brew) between now and the end of the evening. Nothing too fancy 'cause it ain't in the budget.
 

Huntsman

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Wound up being Old-Fashioneds for the pre-dinner cocktail, Gewurtz with dinner, Sloe Gin Fizzes afterwards (but I made them like sours, no soda, but yes to white and a splash of Cointreau). Grand Marnier Centenaire after dinner, now catching up on long overdue correspondence with Oban Distiller's edition, ice, and a splash of water.
Originally Posted by gomestar
if you're dropping $200 no a Riesling, odds are you'll be picking up a Trockenbeerenauslese or a Beerenauslese. Stellar wines, no doubt, but high residual sugar that I think would be more suited as a dessert wine (as they usually are regardless of the meal). Also, you'll be dropping big coin for a 375 ml bottle. For German riesling, I'd probably stick with Spätlese or Auslese, the former being a little dryer. It's easy to spend $35-70 in this category and pick up a sensational wine. I'd drink these with the actual meal and then leave the big guns for the dessert.
Yeah, a Beeren- or Trocken- would really be to sweet for the meal, and are the only $200 Rieslings I can think of also. $50 can land you a stunning Spatlese, which is the sugar level I'd be looking for with Thanksgiving. Darn near opened a Trocken for dessert, but the mood went to cocktails. ~ H
 

youngScholar

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Smoking Loon and Wily Jack, both 2007 Cabernet Sauvignons.
 

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