What are the greatest menswear brands of all time?

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by YoungAmerican, Sep 18, 2012.

  1. NorCal

    NorCal Senior member

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    Excellent point.
    Punk Rock was another fashion/lifestyle movement that was in many ways a rejection of conforming to social context as well as Darwinian ideals of physical attractiveness.
     


  2. unbelragazzo

    unbelragazzo Jewfro Dubiously Honored

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    ^I'll go back to my original statement of taking preferences as primitive (in the sense of being the basic assumption). The way to figure out if something looks good is not to go investigating what physical traits were advantageous on the plains of Africa, and then investigate if these traits are accentuated in said garment. The way to figure out if something looks good is to look at it. Hardy Amies quote I'm too lazy to type out again:

    http://ivorytowerstyle.tumblr.com/post/31099567302/to-this-as-to-anything-else-that-is-designed-and
     


  3. hendrix

    hendrix Ill-proportioned

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    Well obviously, but you don't just look at something without your senses, your memory, your thoughts, your experiences determining how you perceive it.

    That's getting into philosophy but it's true. Looking at something is not the same thing as perceiving something.
     


  4. unbelragazzo

    unbelragazzo Jewfro Dubiously Honored

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    ^Yes but that's not the distinction I meant. I meant, you can't explain to someone that something can't possibly look good for the reason that it makes his left ear look big and large left ears where particularly disadvantageous for humans tens of thousands of years ago, whereas something else must look good because it makes the right elbow stand out more, and prominent right elbows were a valued trait evolutionarily.
     


  5. hendrix

    hendrix Ill-proportioned

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    Ah, gotcha
     


  6. dieworkwear

    dieworkwear Senior member

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    Anyone remember this?

    Hilarious.
     


  7. The Thin Man

    The Thin Man Senior member

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    Thank you for taking the time to respond to my posts.

    I'm actually not a Citizen Kane fan either, but I hope you can admit that a great deal of thought went into it, that it contained a great deal of technical innovation, that it influenced other movies that are worth watching, Vern.

    I personally think people are most interesting when they aren't just a sum of their cultural inheritance, when they pursue unique paths of thinking and living, so that what they happen to like says something unique about them. Or better yet, what they happen to like says something unique about the world.

    That one is able to like possessions because he is not a serf isn't the most interesting thing to say about a person's tastes.

    I wasn't advocating presciptivism. I would say that "creativity" in clothing that isn't a lasting source of inspiration for others isn't worthy of the name. Or of being deemed "great."
     
    Last edited: Sep 24, 2012




  8. The Thin Man

    The Thin Man Senior member

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    I don't know what objective knowledge of human endeavors really is. The best we can hope for is intersubjective agreement, so let's keep talking. Being able to articulate one's perspective is perhaps a rare talent, and highly valuable.

    Some of my favorite Style Forum posts succeed at this, and are not at all what you are describing. I'd point you toward Holdfast's reasoning behind what he wears, or the post from a couple of months ago by a SW&D member describing their favorite clothes that Fok put on the front page. Really any well-informed member getting at the roots of what he likes is usually interesting.

    Just because describing one's aesthetic sense is never going to be a perfect excercise doesn't mean that when executed well, it can't be rewarding for others. I tend to value rationality and reflection even when achieving them is more of a goal than a possibilty. I don't think I'm alone.

    Trying to understand ourselves, let alone other people, is one of our highest callings, partly because of the challenges you outline. To me, it has the potential to be more rewarding than cataloguing commercial successes or even broad social themes.
     
    Last edited: Sep 24, 2012


  9. The Thin Man

    The Thin Man Senior member

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    That's cool. I just didn't like seeing brands discussed in primarily commercial or sociological terms. I didn't see much about beauty, which to me = great.
     


  10. dieworkwear

    dieworkwear Senior member

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    I know from this thread that my following view is only a result of a lifetime's worth of cultural, sociological, and even economic-class conditioning, but I will assert, despite having no real objective reasoning to back up my view: I think the Italians make some ugly ass shoes. The English do it so much better.
     
    Last edited: Sep 24, 2012


  11. LA Guy

    LA Guy Opposite Santa Staff Member Admin Moderator

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    Completely tangential, but I have ELO, Gazebo, Tears for Fears, The Jesus and Mary Chain, Muse, 2 Chainz, classic (pre-humous) Tupac, Chopin, and Meursault all on the same playlist (just looking at what is coming up next). I'm assuming that there are minds being blown right now.
     


  12. rach2jlc

    rach2jlc Prof. Fabulous Dubiously Honored

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    +1, looking at my list now I see a potential shuffle of Blizzard of ozz (Mr. Crowley!), Montserrat Caballe, Don Shirley Trio, Johnny cash, and Janet Jackson's Velvet Rope. Nice to know there are fellow listeners out there with equally eclectic tastes.
     


  13. SpooPoker

    SpooPoker Internet Bigtimer and Most Popular Man on Campus Dubiously Honored Affiliate Vendor

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    This is now the most interesting thread on MC.
     


  14. LA Guy

    LA Guy Opposite Santa Staff Member Admin Moderator

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    The silhouettes of Yamamoto's Y3 line, and in particular the early collections, were based on the athletic garments given by the American forces to Japanese people. They were obviously oversized (I think that that typical American man probably outweighs the average Japanese man by a good 50-60 lbs and is a whole lot taller.

    I've heard the sentiment that Yamamoto expressed articulated by some older Chinese men as well, who contend that the western suit was not conceived with the Asian (well, specifically Han Chinese) frame in mind, and so, looks ridiculous on many Chinese men, and that this is why Chinese men actually look much better in period dress, in the robes of Manchu ruled China. Had I lived a hundred years ago, and been born and raised in Imperial China, I may have thought the same way. Of course, I was raised in Kingston, Ontario, so I dress, fundamentally, like a small town Canadian boy, and I have a frame that is much larger than that of the average Southern Chinese (I am 5'11" and tip the scale at 175 lbs).

    Maybe it's part of the heritage of being a first generation immigrant, but I've often wondered how different might be the way I look, the way I think, the way I feel, about any number of things, if some other accidents of history had occurred.
     


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