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Wedding Dress code: "No Jeans"

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Quarmac, Aug 12, 2012.

  1. Bounder

    Bounder Senior member

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    :eh: That is not proper black tie at all.

    http://www.blacktieguide.com
     
  2. BrizzleCizzle

    BrizzleCizzle Senior member

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    I apologize if that was miscontrued. I meant it in the frame of staying away from any outfit that might convey "I'm shooting for black tie." Good note on the specifics of true black tie.
     
  3. HughJ

    HughJ Senior member

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    +1. I say this all the time. Plus its a good opportunity to add some life to that outfit.
     
  4. tradernick

    tradernick Senior member

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    You're right. The only thing that's worse is if a woman shows up and upstages the bride.

    1. Wear a tie.

    2. You have an opportunity here that a lot of people won't get. Because of the anonymity of the 'net, people are willing to say things to you that they wouldn't say face to face. Often it will be bogus flaming, but in this case, it's valuable for you.

    Here's the deal - if that's the expression you usually put on your face when someone points a camera at you, change it.
     
  5. GBR

    GBR Senior member

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    A little drab for a wedding but it meets the so-called 'dress code' if that is a fair description of it.
     
  6. dirkweems

    dirkweems Well-Known Member

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    "No Jeans"...are you leaving out some details? Is the wedding in a park, on a farm, on the beach, in a pub? If the bride is wearing a wedding dress and the groom a tux, then show some respect to the bride, groom, their families, the church, temple or justice of the peace and wear a clean suit with a tie. However, if the wedding is in a teepee in a national park or at Harry Potter World, then by all means satisfy the "No Jeans" request/guidance. Don't worry about dressing to nice and upstaging the groom. After all, this is the one day he gets the girl. a wedding is generally a coming of age event so try not to be the bloke who looks like he isn't mature enough to dress appropriately and stand his drink.
     
  7. jeff13007

    jeff13007 Senior member

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    I agree with this to a certain extent only. If you are saying everyone there is going to be wearing suits and you are afraid of wearing a bespoke SR suit or a Brioni one then don't be because you are still within the dress limits set by the wedding party. If everyone there is in a dress shirt and slacks (including the groom) then you will look like a tool wearing a suit or even a sports jacket. In the end its really your own choice but keep in mind that this is THEIR wedding that they were gracious enough to invite you too not some "opportunity to show your sartorial splendor". If you want a chance to dress up then just dress up for a night on the town, but let them have their day.
     
  8. RogerC

    RogerC Senior member

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    Grey trousers, white or light blue shirt, navy jacket, rolled-up tie in your pocket. Add tie or lose jacket depending on the formality you see when you arrive.
     
  9. HughJ

    HughJ Senior member

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    I don't think we've reached a point where attending a social event in a sport coat could be perceived this way. Yet.....
     
  10. BrizzleCizzle

    BrizzleCizzle Senior member

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    Sound advice. Very sound.

    Not at all. Unless of course we loosen the defintion of social event to included meeting friends at a fast food joint or seeing a movie (and, really, going to a movie probably is still okay for a sport coat, so nevermind on the movie).

    To quote some random quote: "You can never be over dressed or over educated". While I wouldn't recommend following this to a T and showing up in black tie, I would most certainly never recommend dressing to the lowest acceptable defintion of "No Jeans" in attempt to not upstage everyone. It's a wedding, for crying out loud, if they didn't want you too dressed up they would've said "No Jackets".
     
  11. jeff13007

    jeff13007 Senior member

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    Yes. Seriously. I never said to "dress clumsily to avoid not looking dressed up" i was saying he should be appropriately dressed for the occasion. I probably should have added that he should ask what is expected of guests. Lets put this into a different prospective 50-60 years ago if you were invited to a wedding in england and the attire they requested was lounge suits or w/e they called what we today know as a suit, and you showed up in a morning coat because you didn't want to "shoot for the lowest acceptable level" and then you claim well you should have said "please don't wear a morning coat" how would that make you sound?

    P.S I'm totally in agreement that there should be a return to some form of formality in dressing. For me i really don't understand why people don't like wearing suits, in essence a well cut suit hides what is physically wrong with us, be it dropped shoulder, higher waist on one side, sloping shoulders, big chest/stomach etc and i have no idea why people are satisfied with a dress shirt, slacks, and a pair of square toed shoes. But with that being said you should respect the dress code set by the wedding party and if its unclear you should ask
     
  12. JonasAberg

    JonasAberg Well-Known Member

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    I always think it's a lot better to be overdressed than underdressed.
    If you are wearing a suit and notice no one else is - just remove the tie and you're instantly dressed a lot less formal. If that still isn't enough - remove the jacket. Still not enough - roll up the sleeves, take off your shoes and walk around barefoot. However, if you arrive at a function and realize you are way underdressed there is very little you can do.
     
  13. Elegantly Wasted

    Elegantly Wasted Senior member

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  14. Balfour

    Balfour Senior member

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    I'm afraid this example is not analogous to the OP's situation, nor does it work to rebut the argument that the OP should not wear a suit: A morning suit, as formal day dress, is plainly incompatible with the dress code indicated in your example (lounge suits). Dressing in a morning suit would breach the dress code stipulated. Suggesting that someone would need to say "please don't wear a morning coat" is really suggesting that they should define the dress code they have stipulated, not further refine it. In this day and age, that may well be sensible but it is not necessary.

    In this situation, the only dress code that has been indicated is "no jeans". I agree that the trend towards increasingly casual dress is regrettable. But often the absence as to any indication as to dress is more problematic (the dress code at a funeral I attended recently was "dress as you please"). I agree that there are risks in turning up at an event with an extremely broad dress code and turning out to be the only person in a suit. But I also agree that one shouldn't seek the safety of the lowest common denominator. One has to try to make the best estimate (based on one's knowledge of the event and the other guests) as to where the centre of gravity is likely to be and where one wants to position oneself. I would seek to be at the more formal end, but not a complete outlier. A good option may be a more casual patterned suit, or a odd jacket and odd trousers than could be dressed up with a tie (or not) depending on the circumstances.

    Of course, the best bit of advice in the thread may be to contact the wedding party. Although they too might be surprised by what people turn up in, they are probably likely to have a better idea of the tastes, &c. of the guests they have invited.
     
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2012
  15. Velophone

    Velophone Member

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    Nothing "problematic" about that: you simply show up in what makes you comfortable, as the deceased presumably would have wished. No risk of being in the wrong clothes there, which makes it a perfectly useful, if SF-unapproved, dress code.
     
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2012

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