Water damage to leather goods

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Catch-22, Sep 29, 2004.

  1. Catch-22

    Catch-22 Active Member

    Messages:
    27
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2003
    Location:
    San Francisco
    Hello everyone, So a couple days ago, my girlfriend accidentally (at least I hope so) spilled a glass of water on my leather striped paul smith wallet (example below) [​IMG] It apparently sat in the pool of water for an hour or so and is now pretty damaged from the whole incident. I towel/air-dried the wallet and it is now ok, but one side (the water exposed one) is kind of hard/brittle from the ordeal. I was wondering if anyone had any suggestions on how to restore it to its original condition. Â It is still usable, but not nearly as soft/smooth as when I originally purchased it a few weeks ago. I'd love suggestions on some kind of leather toner/cream that would be usable on such a sensitive piece (not sure how dyed the stripes are onto the leather, and I wouldn't want to completely rub off the wallet pattern) Thanks in advance,
     


  2. LA Guy

    LA Guy Opposite Santa Staff Member Admin Moderator

    Messages:
    35,118
    Likes Received:
    12,340
    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2002
    Location:
    Moscow, Idaho
    Honestly, just use it a lot. After a while, the leather will soften and smooth out naturally.
     


  3. VMan

    VMan Senior member

    Messages:
    5,103
    Likes Received:
    25
    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2003
    Perhaps either a leather conditioner (either the kind meant for leather upholistery, or for leather jackets and such) or a leather cream (for shoes) might work. These are just suggestions, though, I've never tried either, so you should just try them on a small corner of the wallet first.
     


  4. j

    j (stands for Jerk) Admin

    Messages:
    14,914
    Likes Received:
    93
    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2002
    Location:
    Seattle, WA
    I've heard neat's foot oil for softening up leather but not explicitly for dyed/glazed/painted leather. I don't know if it would be a good idea but there you go.

    On leather upholstery (in my car) I use a solution of 7 or so to 1 water:woolite to clean it, and then use a leather conditioner meant for upholstery like Lexol. This stuff is meant for leather with a coating on it, and also designed not to rub off onto clothes when used as directed. It softens leather up pretty well. You might look into that, it's only 6 bucks or so.
     


  5. Tom

    Tom Senior member

    Messages:
    274
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2004
    Location:
    Berkeley, California
    I agree with LA Guy. Using it a lot is the best way to restore leather.

    -Tom
     


  6. SS1088

    SS1088 Member

    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2004
    looks like the wallpaper in my friends apartment that has not changed since 1976.
     


  7. Catch-22

    Catch-22 Active Member

    Messages:
    27
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2003
    Location:
    San Francisco
    I appreciate the suggestions.

    I guess I'll just try living in it for a while and hope it gets back to normal.  Maybe I can beat it up or something - akin to baseball players beating up their gloves to wear them in.

    On the positive, maybe it will tone down the brightness of the wallet a bit.  I ordered it online and it arrived a bit louder than what I initially estimated.

    Thanks again,
     


  8. MikeF

    MikeF Senior member

    Messages:
    462
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2002
    LA Guy's suggestion will work, eventually, but mink oil will restore it to like-new condition immediately and shouldn't adversely affect the colour. (Get it from your local shoe repair shop.)
     


  9. stache

    stache Senior member

    Messages:
    316
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2004
    I would be leery of using mink oil on this item because of the colors. Maybe a light coating of Lexol, or Meltonian neutral.
     


Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by