1. And... we're back. You'll notice that all of your images are back as well, as are our beloved emoticons, including the infamous :foo: We have also worked with our server folks and developers to fix the issues that were slowing down the site.

    There is still work to be done - the images in existing sigs are not yet linked, for example, and we are working on a way to get the images to load faster - which will improve the performance of the site, especially on the pages with a ton of images, and we will continue to work diligently on that and keep you updated.

    Cheers,

    Fok on behalf of the entire Styleforum team
    Dismiss Notice

was it worth it?

Discussion in 'Business, Careers & Education' started by Windycity, Mar 22, 2011.

  1. Don Carlos

    Don Carlos Senior member

    Messages:
    7,527
    Joined:
    May 15, 2009
    But then you might end up being too important to post on SF right? /shrug.
    I dunno. I'd like to think I still could have been slinging dick jokes on SF as a Supreme Court justice or Goldman Sachs MD.
     
  2. Don Carlos

    Don Carlos Senior member

    Messages:
    7,527
    Joined:
    May 15, 2009
    Maybe. But I sincerely believe that thinking about what could have been had you done EVERYTHING perfectly is a waste of time. As I posted earlier, if we all knew what we know now we might do things differently. But would we be any happier? I have my doubt. I know some people who had a "plan" and followed it perfectly. All of them are successful but they are certainly not all happy or well adjusted. I think any well adjusted and ultimately happy life requires some level of adversity to overcome and some level of failure to deal with.
    Your argument assumes two things: 1) That I am happy in my current state / with my outcome. 2) That I value peace of mind or "adjustment" over material success. Both of those are assumptions are, at least to some large degree, incorrect. I do agree that it's a waste of time to obsess over what went wrong, or what I could have done differently. Then again, I don't obsess over it. I don't really give it more than the occasional thought. Only reason I brought it up in the first place is because it provided some advice relevant to this thread.
     
  3. kxk

    kxk Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    98
    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2011
    I definitely slacked off a lot in school at all levels, ending up with very mediocre grades in high school, college, AND grad school.

    Somehow, I lucked into some excellent schools--both college and law school--and job opportunities, even outside my fields of concentration. And I would definitely say that, above all else, having a recognized school name on my resume helped a lot in opening doors that might not otherwise be open. That is, I was able to leverage, say, an 10 points worth of effort in law school to get a job that would have required 100 points worth of effort from someone that didn't go to the kind of schools that I did. Does that make me smarter, or more likely to succeed? Not at all, but it has made everything a lot easier.

    So while I might not be able to add much to "was the hours worth studying worth it", I will definitely add to the chorus that going to a good school is definitely worth it, at least in the US and in Asia (the OP, I take it, is from Switzerland, and I understand things work a little differently in Europe).
    Not to say that you can't make it big with a run-of-the-mill diploma, but having that school name definitely makes the doors a lot more open and the roads a lot easier to travel.
    And I do often regret that I was not diligent enough to (1) get myself into even better schools and/or (2) make the best out of the situation in which I found myself.

    But in the end, it's all about what makes you happy, man. If being a Starbucks barista and working 35 hrs/wk and chilling the rest of the time is what makes you happy (and there's nothing wrong with that), then the hours invested probably won't have been worth it. And in fact, I'm sure this is a choice that a lot of people, especially in the US, make all the time.
     
  4. thenanyu

    thenanyu Senior member

    Messages:
    2,380
    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2009
    Location:
    San Francisco
    My response to all of this is to always optimize your current situation. In a lot of industries, people's reputations are built upon one or two breakthrough successes, so if you are always on the lookout for your big break and prepared to grab it, chances are any past deficiencies will not affect you so much.

    I'm a true believer in "it's never too late to start".
     
  5. Monaco

    Monaco Senior member

    Messages:
    803
    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2010
    School did nothing but make me lazy, I've realized that I learned more from running a volunteer organization, working in the real world, and studying subjects that I enjoy on my own terms. But everybody is different.

    All of my ambition and entrepreneurial/leadership skills came from when I ran the non-profit a couple of years into college. If I hadn't done that, I wouldn't be building a business today. I was a pretty stupid high school student.
     
  6. RSS

    RSS Senior member

    Messages:
    10,042
    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2008
    Location:
    No.1 Nonsuch Place
    Were all those hours you invested into studying in high school/college worth it? Are you where you wanted to be? Im only in high school and I belong to the top 10 percent of all students in the country but I ask myself if it is really worth it. what do you guys have to say to this?
    College? Yes. Highschool? I didn't finish.
     
  7. gungadin25

    gungadin25 Senior member

    Messages:
    122
    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2008
    Yes and no. Yes in that it helped get me to where I am today. No in that I wish I was more well rounded today.
     
  8. RSS

    RSS Senior member

    Messages:
    10,042
    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2008
    Location:
    No.1 Nonsuch Place
    Yes and no. Yes in that it helped get me to where I am today. No in that I wish I was more well rounded today.
    The right courses at college -- and even indepenent study apart from school -- can certainly help one to be well rounded. It just takes a little effort.
     
  9. gettoasty

    gettoasty Senior member

    Messages:
    12,295
    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2010
    Location:
    Home
    good points in here: should have studied the material more in terms of understanding my major more than studying to pass. now that i think about it, finishing my last quarter, it should balance out if i actually understood the material fully than maintaining my gpa i.e. i understand business but ended up with a 3.0 vs. i understand business (but should hit the books when i go interview/work) with a > 3.5 ... right?? potential employers could care less about my gpa if i can actually understand the field
    [​IMG]
     
  10. GQgeek

    GQgeek Senior member

    Messages:
    17,933
    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2002
    Location:
    Canuckistan
    thenanyu is right about HS providing the best cost-benefit investment you can make in yourself. Work your ass off and try to get into the top 10 or whatever. He's also right that you can always optimize your current situation.

    I really wish i'd studied harder in HS. I was at the top of a couple classes, but overall I didn't do jack shit and my grades showed it. Had I applied myself, who knows? But that's life. For various reasons I didn't apply myself, and I didn't apply myself in university either until it was too late to really matter.

    It's not like I'm hurting or unhappy, but there's a big big difference over a lifetime between the earnings of top 1% vs. top 5% and that bugs me. That said, it's also proof that even if you totally fuck up in school, if you're smart, work hard, and have decent people skills, you can still do better than 90-95% of the population, but it will be harder to get up there and you'll probably have a glass ceiling unless you're entrepreneurial.
     
  11. bigbadbuff

    bigbadbuff Senior member

    Messages:
    1,743
    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2002
    Perhaps I can give some different perspective.

    I did not try hard in HS and got decent but unexceptional grades (2.8 cum gpa, 1020 SAT). I was an idiot and listened to my guidance counselor who, still unbelievably, recommended I go to the local community college rather than apply to schools. To this day I don't know why I listened to her and did not investigate on my own (she was shitcanned a year later after some parents of other kids found out she was doing this), but hearing that from someone I thought I could trust with helping me make decisions killed my desire to even apply to 'real' schools, and off I went to the local CC. After a year of straight As and thinking it was too easy I got bored and more interested in working, so I thought I would go to school at night and work full time. Not surprisingly, night school did not last.

    Long story short, I work in IT and where even a few years ago the right work experience/certs could get you a job, no longer. It is less important in this field to go to a 'name' school aside from the obvious networking that comes with going to Va Tech/UVA here. I started back a few years ago by taking online classes at an out of state school and finished last year. I wanted to have a high GPA and got it but it won't do me any good- it was for personal satisfaction, I would never even put honors/GPA stuff on a resume.

    I went back and finished because I really wanted/needed a degree, but I missed out on doing it the typical way and that will always, always be a regret.

    I strongly considered continuing on to a Master's but it is completely useless in my field for what I want to do, and my personal satisfaction is not worth the mountain of debt. For some fields it is a must, for most I would say busting ass for the Bachelor's and making good connections completely beats getting a Master's. I know quite a few people who got a Master's just because they couldn't figure out what they wanted to do... didn't help many of them and added a nice 50k to their loans.
     
  12. accopy

    accopy Member

    Messages:
    8
    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2011
    I have watched the progress of Tansies personal website from beginning to end. I have been very impressed with the time and effort people have devoted to its creation. I now have one question. Was it worth it in the sense of, has it made any difference to her enquiries and her bookings?

    Alan
     
  13. Lord-Barrington

    Lord-Barrington Senior member

    Messages:
    2,811
    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2010
    thenanyu is right about HS providing the best cost-benefit investment you can make in yourself. Work your ass off and try to get into the top 10 or whatever. He's also right that you can always optimize your current situation.

    I really wish i'd studied harder in HS. I was at the top of a couple classes, but overall I didn't do jack shit and my grades showed it. Had I applied myself, who knows? But that's life. For various reasons I didn't apply myself, and I didn't apply myself in university either until it was too late to really matter.

    It's not like I'm hurting or unhappy, but there's a big big difference over a lifetime between the earnings of top 1% vs. top 5% and that bugs me. That said, it's also proof that even if you totally fuck up in school, if you're smart, work hard, and have decent people skills, you can still do better than 90-95% of the population, but it will be harder to get up there and you'll probably have a glass ceiling unless you're entrepreneurial.


    I somewhat disagree with this. We tend to think that matriculating at an elite university is a golden ticket mostly because the ranks of the business and political elite are filled with graduates of these schools but life is far more complicated than simply being accepted to Columbia and then making the big bucks. You need a plan, no matter where you go to college. The big difference between the elites and everywhere else is that kids who are accepted there, besides being smart, almost always have a plan. That translates to smarter career choices during school (i.e. internships) smarter choices upon graduation, and smarter choices afterwards as well. Add to this the fact that kids who end up at these schools often have educated and successful (and wealthy) families which means they are already start out with a better network and professional support network as freshman than many of us will ever have.

    Simply saying that elite universities are a springboard to wealth and success is very naive. They certainly help in opening doors but the real difference between elite schools and everywhere else is the students who attend them.
     
  14. SirGrotius

    SirGrotius Senior member

    Messages:
    2,868
    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2011
    If you slack off in school you slack off in life. There's no difference. The whole "book" smart vs. "street" smart thing is a sop to wimps.

    Anyway...of course school was worth it unless you enjoy being an ignoramus.
     
  15. Milpool

    Milpool Senior member

    Messages:
    921
    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2010
    If you slack off in school you slack off in life. There's no difference. The whole "book" smart vs. "street" smart thing is a sop to wimps.

    Anyway...of course school was worth it unless you enjoy being an ignoramus.


    I certainly didn't need school to stop me from being an ignoramus. One doesn't need school to learn. The public library is a great place to learn.
     
  16. pinchi22

    pinchi22 Senior member

    Messages:
    448
    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2004
    Location:
    Spain, California
    Yeah, it´s worth it.

    But, in the end, the important thing will be the discipline to persevere, not your GPA. Seriously.
     
  17. kxk

    kxk Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    98
    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2011
    The big difference between the elites and everywhere else is that kids who are accepted there, besides being smart, almost always have a plan. That translates to smarter career choices during school (i.e. internships) smarter choices upon graduation, and smarter choices afterwards as well.

    I am not so sure that I would give so much credit to the top school attendees. Not that I disagree with you totally, but there's more to the game than just being smart, hardworking, and having a plan.
    The right degree can absolutely kick open doors that would otherwise be shut, even to some of the less-qualified students at these schools. I didn't attend the very best schools, by any means, but definitely "top 10" in both undergraduate and graduate. And you'd really be surprised at how many mediocre students, including myself, have received opportunities that they would not have otherwise.
    And seriously, while these "mediocre" kids are definitely still on the very bright side of the larger spectrum, it in no way implies that they "would have kicked the competition's ass had they gone to a lesser school".
    Of course, rising to the top of the world takes more than a degree--but sometimes, the typical very smart and very hardworking kid often isn't even aware of some of the opportunities out there, and while not having these opportunities might not prevent an otherwise bright/hardworking kid from rising to the top, having those opportunities make it a heck lot easier.
     
  18. Lord-Barrington

    Lord-Barrington Senior member

    Messages:
    2,811
    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2010
    I am not so sure that I would give so much credit to the top school attendees. Not that I disagree with you totally, but there's more to the game than just being smart, hardworking, and having a plan.
    The right degree can absolutely kick open doors that would otherwise be shut, even to some of the less-qualified students at these schools. I didn't attend the very best schools, by any means, but definitely "top 10" in both undergraduate and graduate. And you'd really be surprised at how many mediocre students, including myself, have received opportunities that they would not have otherwise.
    And seriously, while these "mediocre" kids are definitely still on the very bright side of the larger spectrum, it in no way implies that they "would have kicked the competition's ass had they gone to a lesser school".
    Of course, rising to the top of the world takes more than a degree--but sometimes, the typical very smart and very hardworking kid often isn't even aware of some of the opportunities out there, and while not having these opportunities might not prevent an otherwise bright/hardworking kid from rising to the top, having those opportunities make it a heck lot easier.


    I wasn't implying that elite schools are filled with geniuses. Aside from places like MIT and CalTech, which are filled with geniuses, I don't think students at elites are necessarily smarter than at most other schools. The difference, as I stated, is that most of these kids have "a plan" and a support system that makes it easier for them to strategically position themselves through early adulthood and into their career. And that, more than hard work or intelligence, is the key to professional success.
     
  19. kjamesuvic

    kjamesuvic Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    88
    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2010
    I'm 3rd year right now doing a BSc in Econ at a mediocre Canadian university. I slacked off in high school, just getting good enough grades to get me into uni. I only study about 3 or 4 hours a week now and I have around a B+ average; good enough to get me into a Master's program at another mediocre school. My plan after I graduate is almost set out (which is good).

    Of course I think the hours I spent and am spending studying are 'worth it,' but that doesn't mean you should bust your ass off in school studying and rack up $100k in student loans only to get a high GPA. Keep your social life intact, it will keep you sane. There's been a few kids who got rejected from top schools with 4.0 GPA's just because they had no life outside of school.

    The best advice I can give is go to school (if you really want to). Get into the best school you can. Study hard and play way the fuck harder. Make a lot of friends and bang the hottest girls you can, just to say you did it. And most importantly, DO YOU.
     

Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by