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was it worth it?

Discussion in 'Business, Careers & Education' started by Windycity, Mar 22, 2011.

  1. Joffrey

    Joffrey Senior member

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    Were all those hours you invested into studying in high school/college worth it? Are you where you wanted to be? Im only in high school and I belong to the top 10 percent of all students in the country but I ask myself if it is really worth it. what do you guys have to say to this?
    I didn't study much so yeah I got a great deal. Studying just a tad more would've made my life a ton easier and opened up some great doors for me though. I'm in a great career so no complaints, but I do know I'm missing out somewhere...
     
  2. Eason

    Eason Senior member

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    I wish I studied harder in college.
     
  3. ConcernedParent

    ConcernedParent Senior member

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    ^^ Wow, a spam drone that engages in conversation.
     
  4. Nereis

    Nereis Senior member

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    People repeat the names of famous people without understanding what they're talking about. Bill Gates went to Harvard, was in Math55 and was doing differential geometry of Banach manifolds at 19. Totally different situation to the average college dropout.
     
  5. HgaleK

    HgaleK Senior member

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    Were all those hours you invested into studying in high school/college worth it? Are you where you wanted to be? Im only in high school and I belong to the top 10 percent of all students in the country but I ask myself if it is really worth it. what do you guys have to say to this?

    College is awesome. Just be careful not to gas yourself.
     
  6. Kiwi Man

    Kiwi Man Senior member

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    People repeat the names of famous people without understanding what they're talking about. Bill Gates went to Harvard, was in Math55 and was doing differential geometry of Banach manifolds at 19. Totally different situation to the average college dropout.

    I didn't know this piece of information before. Thank you!
     
  7. Valor

    Valor Senior member

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    Yeah, but hindsight is 20/20. If I would have known better I might have:

    1) Studied my ass of in HS
    2) Attended Princeton
    3) Studied my ass off at Princeton
    4) Rhodes Scholar
    5) YLS
    6) Clerk for a Supreme Court Justice
    7) State Department

    But life doesn't work like that, at least not for most of us. Most of us screw up for awhile and then snap out of it one day and try to put something good together that will take us somewhere. That's what I did, and I'm goddamn I'm proud I did it my way. Don't get me wrong, following the above mentioned path may have been more straightforward (even if it demands incredible amounts of work) but I'm proud of myself that I turned my life around, to some extent. It's really been a wonderful and affirming experience, as corny as that sounds.


    This is unrealistic. Your odds of going to YLS are near nonexistant, even if you went to Princeton. You may not realize how difficult it is, but it's near impossible.
     
  8. maverick

    maverick Senior member

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    This is unrealistic. Your odds of going to YLS are near nonexistant, even if you went to Princeton. You may not realize how difficult it is, but it's near impossible.

    I don't understand why you would chose that step to comment on. There are 250 acceptances to YLS each year... if you get excellent grades at Princeton calling it near impossible is a bit of a stretch. Harder to get US Rhodes or SC clerkship.
     
  9. Valor

    Valor Senior member

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    Princeton has a class size of 1200, of the people who want to go to Law school, there are probably 400 students (Philosophy, History, PoliSci, English, and WWS to a much lesser extent, Econ are the majors who generally go into law).

    Of these 400 students, probably 200 of them are actually academically competitive. YLS accepts 1-2 students from Princeton a year, you want to be top 1% at Princeton, it seems rather difficult it's not something you can just "work hard" to do, everyone works hard, you're looking at 3-5 hours of sleep a night for 4 years to maintain a 3.9 GPA.

    It's one thing to say you graduated the top of your class in HS or even at a medium tier university, to say you graduated top at a top 10 Uni is very very different.

    I'm just saying it's much harder than it seems.
     
  10. munchausen

    munchausen Senior member

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    Ask me during my 3l year, or even my first 2 years after school, and I would have said no. But these days I like my job and I'm doing pretty well financially. Honestly, I can't imagine doing anything else for a living and I couldn't do what I'm doing without the school.
     
  11. Milpool

    Milpool Senior member

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    School was a waste for me. Definitely NOT worth the time, effort and money in my case.
     
  12. cretaceous_cretin

    cretaceous_cretin Senior member

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    Based on the return on investment of time and cost of going to college, yes!
     
  13. Fraiche

    Fraiche Senior member

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    Without question, yes. Getting into a good college for undergrad in a reputable program opens doors like you wouldn't believe. As an ex-slacker in good school, you really notice this shit. [​IMG]
     
  14. Huntsman

    Huntsman Senior member

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    The question is difficult because people have a range of talents, abilities, drives, and ambitions. Is it worth it for someone who doesn't want to go to college and aim for a more or less 'professional' life to get the requirements for that life? Is it worth it for someone to foreclose the opportunity to have that life because of a little extra work? There's a spectrum -- in the U.S., at least, a college degree is no guarantee of a good job, or any job at all. But it certainly is a requirement for many good jobs.

    At the very least, applying yourself to your learning and to doing well is rarely a bad thing, especially if you are a good student and it's not too hard for you to do well -- that is not an opportunity given to all. Doing well in school will preserve the widest range of opportunities for you after school, and there are lessons learned from the discipline you have to maintain to do well.

    As for me, it certainly was worth it, even though I'm back in school again -- I would never have had this opportunity had I not worked as hard as I did, and knowing that gives me the opportunity to hold my head high and know that my sweat and sacrifice was a substantial part of getting me to where I am.

    Note that all of this implies an understanding about the risk of the path you are taking; hard work is hard work and I respect that, but hard work is not always valued as your might wish it was -- some people's labor have not gotten them where they wanted to be for many societal reasons, so do be sure that your expectations are reasonable (or that you are prepared to risk for your dreams -- something I do not discount, but that does not always work out).

    Whatever you do, do it well.

    ~ H
     
  15. Mr. White

    Mr. White Senior member

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    Were all those hours you invested into studying in high school/college worth it?

    I did the assigned work and took the tests. Before an exam, I spent an hour or so reviewing class notes. I still have no idea what "studying" means or why people whine about it.

    Are you where you wanted to be?

    I long ago stopped thinking about life in terms of serving myself (ie: "life is a journey not a destination").

    Im only in high school and I belong to the top 10 percent of all students in the country but I ask myself if it is really worth it. what do you guys have to say to this?

    If you don't like school, where else would you go? The military? Chances are, you'll pass through an academic institution on the way to becoming an officer. A regular job? Not too many options there.

    At any rate, if you don't want to go to college, don't. It'll always be there if you change your mind.
     
  16. Don Carlos

    Don Carlos Senior member

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    Biggest piece lf advice I can give kids these days is: don't slack off once you get to college. I busted my ass in HS, got into a great university, then took 'er a little too easy when I got there. Thought I deserved the break, frankly, and that my work was done.

    Dumbest thing ever.

    I do alright for myself, so it's not like I have failed my shot at life. But there's no question I'd be extremely more successful than I am now had I continued busting my ass in college. Not a day goes by that I don't rue my poor choices at that critical stage.
     
  17. thenanyu

    thenanyu Senior member

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    Biggest piece lf advice I can give kids these days is: don't slack off once you get to college. I busted my ass in HS, got into a great university, then took 'er a little too easy when I got there. Thought I deserved the break, frankly, and that my work was done.

    Dumbest thing ever.

    I do alright for myself, so it's not like I have failed my shot at life. But there's no question I'd be extremely more successful than I am now had I continued busting my ass in college. Not a day goes by that I don't rue my poor choices at that critical stage.


    What would have been different if you got better grades in college? Was there a particular opportunity that you missed out on because of poor grades?
     
  18. Don Carlos

    Don Carlos Senior member

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    What would have been different if you got better grades in college? Was there a particular opportunity that you missed out on because of poor grades?
    There were more than a couple, yes. And, since opportunity cascades (i.e., the benefits of an early opportunity compound / build upon each other), the opportunity cost of my bad grades was pretty high over the course of my lifetime.
     
  19. ConcernedParent

    ConcernedParent Senior member

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    There were more than a couple, yes. And, since opportunity cascades (i.e., the benefits of an early opportunity compound / build upon each other), the opportunity cost of my bad grades was pretty high over the course of my lifetime.

    But then you might end up being too important to post on SF right? /shrug.
     
  20. Lord-Barrington

    Lord-Barrington Senior member

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    There were more than a couple, yes. And, since opportunity cascades (i.e., the benefits of an early opportunity compound / build upon each other), the opportunity cost of my bad grades was pretty high over the course of my lifetime.

    Maybe. But I sincerely believe that thinking about what could have been had you done EVERYTHING perfectly is a waste of time. As I posted earlier, if we all knew what we know now we might do things differently. But would we be any happier? I have my doubt.

    I know some people who had a "plan" and followed it perfectly. All of them are successful but they are certainly not all happy or well adjusted. I think any well adjusted and ultimately happy life requires some level of adversity to overcome and some level of failure to deal with.
     

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