Warmest lining for gloves

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by langdon, Dec 13, 2009.

  1. langdon

    langdon Member

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    I am looking to get a pair of gloves to replace ones I lost recently.
    Being in the midwest it gets pretty cold with winds off Lake Michigan so I wanted to see what lining material best retains heat inside of leather gloves and wicks sufficient moisture away from the hands. Would you go with fleece, cashmere, silk, fur, or something synthetic like Thinsulate
     


  2. mjc

    mjc Senior member

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  3. JayJay

    JayJay Senior member

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    My cashmere lined gloves are very warm, but there may be something else that is warmer.
     


  4. JohnnyLaw

    JohnnyLaw Senior member

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    I guess it depends on the thickness of the lining, but the cashmere lined Dents I have are good for fall weather (maybe down to 0 degrees Celsius). My fur lined and shearling gloves are much warmer, comfortable down to 20 below or so. The shearling ones are my favourites for harsh weather.
     


  5. Bartolo

    Bartolo Senior member

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    I guess it depends on the thickness of the lining, but the cashmere lined Dents I have are good for fall weather (maybe down to 0 degrees Celsius). My fur lined and shearling gloves are much warmer, comfortable down to 20 below or so. The shearling ones are my favourites for harsh weather.

    Any recommendations for brands or sellers of shearling gloves? I need a WARM pair of gloves for the season here.
     


  6. JohnnyLaw

    JohnnyLaw Senior member

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    I went with Chester Jefferies. Great gloves for the price.
     


  7. SirSuturesALot

    SirSuturesALot Senior member

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    As a reference point, I have a pair of kidskin gloves from Madova lined with cashmere. They're fairly warm, but if the temperature drops down to blizzard-like conditions, I reach for gloves blessed by the power of technology.
     


  8. JohnnyLaw

    JohnnyLaw Senior member

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    As a reference point, I have a pair of kidskin gloves lined with cashmere. They're fairly warm, but if the temperature drops down to blizzard-like conditions, I reach for gloves blessed by the power of technology.

    I have yet to see an attractive pair of gloves made with synthetic tech-fabrics. If you're exploring the Arctic, go for it, but for city wear I would stick with shearling.
     


  9. SirSuturesALot

    SirSuturesALot Senior member

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    I have yet to see an attractive pair of gloves made with synthetic tech-fabrics. If you're exploring the Arctic, go for it, but for city wear I would stick with shearling.

    Yep, I agree.
     


  10. Crane's

    Crane's Senior member

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    I am looking to get a pair of gloves to replace ones I lost recently. Being in the midwest it gets pretty cold with winds off Lake Michigan so I wanted to see what lining material best retains heat inside of leather gloves and wicks sufficient moisture away from the hands. Would you go with fleece, cashmere, silk, fur, or something synthetic like Thinsulate
    I lived near Chicago for a lot of years so I know how cold it gets near the lake. You haven't experienced misery until you find yourself on N. Michigan Avenue when the temp is -15F or so with a nice gale coming straight off the lake. If you aren't going to be out in it for any length of time Filson makes a nice leather glove that's Merino wool lined. If you do have to be in it a bit then I would look for something made for Alpine use. This kind of glove is actually two pairs you use together. The inner glove is the wicking layer and makes for a nice cool weather glove on it's own. The outer glove is usually heavily insulated with thinsulate and is water/wind proof. If you have to work in conditions like that then it's another ball game altogether. Then you're looking at heavy mittens with about a half inch of insulation or you'll be stuffing hand warmers down your gloves to keep them warm. I do not miss Chicago Winters at all. You can keep them. LOL. There's also an old trick you need to keep in mind. If you got cold hands and feet cover your head. If you don't it won't matter what you wear you'll get cold.
     


  11. philosophe

    philosophe Senior member

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    Shearling.
     


  12. Patek14

    Patek14 Senior member

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    I agree that thickness and amount of insulation will play a major role in the overall heat loss resistance level.

    speaking from my gut feel on material resistivity (i.e., insulative ability independant of thickness), synthetic material like thinsulate wins.

    I have 2 pairs of gloves with thin linings, one has cashmere lining and one is thinsulate. Both are thin for maximum dexterity, but thinsulate feels the warmest to me. That said, I prefer cashmere lining because it feels nicer on my hands.
     


  13. chorse123

    chorse123 Senior member

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    Shearling.

    +1

    I have a pair of the Chester Jeffries "Snowdon" and they are very warm. Warmer than (rabbit) fur lined, although a little bulky.
     


  14. demo5

    demo5 Senior member

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  15. Crane's

    Crane's Senior member

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    The problem with some of these insulation materials is they do not insulate when wet or damp. Wool is one I know for sure insulates when wet. I'm not aware of any man made material that insulates when wet though that technology may have changed. Some furs do insulate when wet others do not.
     


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