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Warm overcoats

duffyfluffy123

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jayvee

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I just found this. I don't think it is super warm, but versatility at its finest.
https://jpeterman.com/products/reversible-trenchcoat?variant=34159311618107

Also if you're interested in Chrysalis this caught my eye a few weeks ago.
The pockets on that chrysalis though, what were they thinking? I’ve seen better for cheaper tbh and no mention on fabric weight.
 

Nobilis Animus

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I actually don't find tweed a very warm fabric.

It wears like iron and has that texture advantage, but really good tweed is not very tight and doesn't have loft, so something like a good cashmere or melton cloth is much warmer because they cut down on the wind.

The Peterman coat, on the other hand, looks very versatile for autumn.
 

Nobilis Animus

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Mind you, my idea of truly warm starts at fur lining with a wool facing, so it depends on whether we mean for the cold or for really cold.
 

FlyingHorker

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I actually don't find tweed a very warm fabric.

It wears like iron and has that texture advantage, but really good tweed is not very tight and doesn't have loft, so something like a good cashmere or melton cloth is much warmer because they cut down on the wind.

The Peterman coat, on the other hand, looks very versatile for autumn.
I find tweed to be warm, but not windproof for the same reasons you mentioned.

I've heard of "Thornproof Tweed" which is woven fairly dense though.

Melton is quite dense and windproof in comparison, but comparatively a lot more boring looking. I do notice the level of warmth difference though with my 32 oz melton peacoat vs. my above-knee tweed coat that's 22-24 oz.

It's especially noticeable with wind chill that cuts right into your upper back. The melton stops it, the tweed permits it.
 

FlyingHorker

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Mind you, my idea of truly warm starts at fur lining with a wool facing, so it depends on whether we mean for the cold or for really cold.
Not a coat, but important for vain individuals like me who still want to look great and stay warm.

Moleskin trousers!

I noticed this on days where it was -4F, and -40F with wind. I was shocked that pants that feel like pyjamas were so warm and basically blocked the icy chill. I haven't found anything that compares. It's due to the brushed finish and very dense weave.
 

Nobilis Animus

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I find tweed to be warm, but not windproof for the same reasons you mentioned.

I've heard of "Thornproof Tweed" which is woven fairly dense though.

Melton is quite dense and windproof in comparison, but comparatively a lot more boring looking. I do notice the level of warmth difference though with my 32 oz melton peacoat vs. my above-knee tweed coat that's 22-24 oz.

It's especially noticeable with wind chill that cuts right into your upper back. The melton stops it, the tweed permits it.
I've tried Thornproof, but most British makers cite this fabric as a mixture of wool and cotton. It does allow for a tighter weave of the cloth, which I might like for a jacket.

Melton is quite plain, and I wonder how much of that is due to the fact that it also doesn't wrinkle as much. That's why I actually like cashmere too, as it's warm but also textured and can be made up into different styles. The trick is finding one that's dense enough to stand up to much wear. Loro Piana is an obvious choice.
 

Nobilis Animus

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Not a coat, but important for vain individuals like me who still want to look great and stay warm.

Moleskin trousers!

I noticed this on days where it was -4F, and -40F with wind. I was shocked that pants that feel like pyjamas were so warm and basically blocked the icy chill. I haven't found anything that compares. It's due to the brushed finish and very dense weave.
Yes, a lot of people seem to forget this, but warmth is due to your own body heat being radiated back at you. So something with a lofty, brushed finish is actually much better at catching and preserving body heat.
 

FlyingHorker

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I've tried Thornproof, but most British makers cite this fabric as a mixture of wool and cotton. It does allow for a tighter weave of the cloth, which I might like for a jacket.

Melton is quite plain, and I wonder how much of that is due to the fact that it also doesn't wrinkle as much. That's why I actually like cashmere too, as it's warm but also textured and can be made up into different styles. The trick is finding one that's dense enough to stand up to much wear. Loro Piana is an obvious choice.
I'm sure there is heavyweight thornproof cloth out there somewhere. Someone in the cloth thread may know.

Hmm, do you mean the weave and texture of melton relating to it looking plain, but adding wrinkle resistance?

I've yet to try cashmere, a bit too expensive for me overall related to its benefits.
 

Nobilis Animus

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I'm sure there is heavyweight thornproof cloth out there somewhere. Someone in the cloth thread may know.

Hmm, do you mean the weave and texture of melton relating to it looking plain, but adding wrinkle resistance?

I've yet to try cashmere, a bit too expensive for me overall related to its benefits.
Yes, well, the two melton coats I own (a bespoke British warm and peacoat) are both so heavy that they never wrinkle, and the cloth weave is quite smooth, so the end result is that they always drape beautifully but always return to their original form - rather like soldiers. haha

Cashmere is pretty ridiculous, I agree. I'd pick melton cloth first, but if you have the means then it's a comfortable alternative, though I'd still have it with fur trim if possible (and you can carry it off).
 

comrade

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I owned two melton coats : a British Warm, which is gone, and an Invertere
greatcoat which I still have but haven't worn in 30 years. I live in CA now.
What has not been mentioned is Loden cloth. Not as heavy a melton but extremely
dense and practically waterproof. I own a Burberry Balmacaan in Loden. I wore
it in New York in January 2013 during the Polar Vortex when temperatures were 10F
or lower during the day. Over a thick sweater I was very warm even though I was outside
for extended periods- wandering around Manhattan being a tourist in my home town.
 

FlyingHorker

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Yes, well, the two melton coats I own (a bespoke British warm and peacoat) are both so heavy that they never wrinkle, and the cloth weave is quite smooth, so the end result is that they always drape beautifully but always return to their original form - rather like soldiers. haha

Cashmere is pretty ridiculous, I agree. I'd pick melton cloth first, but if you have the means then it's a comfortable alternative, though I'd still have it with fur trim if possible (and you can carry it off).
Sounds about right. I've stuffed my melton coat multiple times into a backpack, sat on it etc, and it never had a wrinkle. Though it's cut with 1/4 synthetics.

Pictures of that bespoke British Warm melton coat being worn would be awesome.
I owned two melton coats : a British Warm, which is gone, and an Invertere
greatcoat which I still have but haven't worn in 30 years. I live in CA now.
What has not been mentioned is Loden cloth. Not as heavy a melton but extremely
dense and practically waterproof. I own a Burberry Balmacaan in Loden. I wore
it in New York in January 2013 during the Polar Vortex when temperatures were 10F
or lower during the day. Over a thick sweater I was very warm even though I was outside
for extended periods- wandering around Manhattan being a tourist in my home town.
That sounds like a pretty rare coat nowadays, the loden balmacaan.

I only see coats in loden cloth in those austrian coats with the weird, lumpy shoulder lines. Any pictures of that one being worn?
 

comrade

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Loden Balmacaan?
I assumed it is Loden. It looks, feels, and performs like Loden.
But I guess it isn't. I just checked the label which says 90% wool
10% cashmere. No "echt" Loden label. I bought in the '80s
before Burberry was taken over by fashionistas.
 

Nobilis Animus

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Sounds about right. I've stuffed my melton coat multiple times into a backpack, sat on it etc, and it never had a wrinkle. Though it's cut with 1/4 synthetics.

Pictures of that bespoke British Warm melton coat being worn would be awesome.

That sounds like a pretty rare coat nowadays, the loden balmacaan.

I only see coats in loden cloth in those austrian coats with the weird, lumpy shoulder lines. Any pictures of that one being worn?
I'll try to take some decent pictures this weekend. It's a great coat - a bit old and showing some wear, but warm as hell and one of the best fits I've ever had.

I did totally forget about Loden, that's true. I understand it's also fairly heavy and windproof, but never tried it before.
 

comrade

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