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Warm overcoats

FlyingHorker

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I can understand not liking the backdrops and settings used by Thomas Farthing, they give Django Unchained vibes in some photos (which I actually really like for presentation and fun).

That was kind of my point for their clothing being aimed at vintage dressers or period dressers, but individually they can easily be used as part of a modern contemporary wardrobe.
 

dieworkwear

Mahatma Jawndi
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I can understand not liking the backdrops and settings used by Thomas Farthing, they give Django Unchained vibes in some photos (which I actually really like for presentation and fun).

That was kind of my point for their clothing being aimed at vintage dressers or period dressers, but individually they can easily be used as part of a modern contemporary wardrobe.
I agree. I think the coats are fairly classic, while the wide pants veer more into vintage. But it's a lookbook, which is meant to be fun. Lookbooks aren't instruction manuals on how to dress.
 

JJ Katz

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Thomas Farthing seems to cater to those who wish to play " dress-up":

COLLECTIONS
HERITAGE LOOKBOOK

ALPINE
Spitsbergen
BRASIL,
JAZZ
Hollywood

I can't wait for their Italian Fascist Collection featuring
clothing inspired by Count Ciano and the Bertolucci film
"The Conformist"t"
Yeah. Just keep telling yourself that the way YOU dress is perfectly in line with contemporary mores...
 

jayvee

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If you’re not into vintage styles this probably isn’t the thread for you. As discussed at length (like an overcoat 😂) they are antiquated and not that efficient but still quite comforting.

Here’s another option (website is refreshingly ludicrous) https://www.harristweedshop.com/index-men-stock-overcoats.html
 

Nobilis Animus

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One other option would be a fur trim:

a96602ca2741bca1e7b6c41d61d251a3.jpg


That's quite a bit shorter than I'd recommend for an overcoat, but it's just to illustrate the general idea.

A cashmere coat with warming pockets and a fur collar like this has the warmth of an overcoat, plus the option of bundling up the collar even tighter to protect the neck and chest. The effect is quite elegant.
 

comrade

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Too bad Invertere went out of business:

invertere coats

I have this one hanging in my closet. It is over 30 years old
from when i lived in Chicago.


7eaa1284-9df6-11e6-9132-40e6ddc82fd9.jpg
 
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Sartorium

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One other option would be a fur trim:

View attachment 1483984


That's quite a bit shorter than I'd recommend for an overcoat, but it's just to illustrate the general idea.

A cashmere coat with warming pockets and a fur collar like this has the warmth of an overcoat, plus the option of bundling up the collar even tighter to protect the neck and chest. The effect is quite elegant.
I always really liked the look of the fur-trimmed overcoats. Who even makes these anymore? Would love to find something belted with lapels like these.
 

Nobilis Animus

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I always really liked the look of the fur-trimmed overcoats. Who even makes these anymore? Would love to find something belted with lapels like these.
They're hard to find. Many places will stock fur-trimmed parkas these days, including sable and the like, possibly because fur trim on these is less problematic for some.

I have two coats with fur trim - one is custom (with a fur lining) and the other an old purchase from a luxury store. I still think they're the most elegant version of the fur coat for men, but will cost upwards of $10,000 these days for a proper one.

Back in the day, buying a full length fur for a man's wife meant he was signalling that he was successful - not going in for the same thing himself. Well, I say the days of a shoddy man are over. A man who can spend on himself is self-assured.
 

Sartorium

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They're hard to find. Many places will stock fur-trimmed parkas these days, including sable and the like, possibly because fur trim on these is less problematic for some.

I have two coats with fur trim - one is custom (with a fur lining) and the other an old purchase from a luxury store. I still think they're the most elegant version of the fur coat for men, but will cost upwards of $10,000 these days for a proper one.

Back in the day, buying a full length fur for a man's wife meant he was signalling that he was successful - not going in for the same thing himself. Well, I say the days of a shoddy man are over. A man who can spend on himself is self-assured.
That sounds...high. for example, this, from N.Peal, clocks in at roughly a third of that, and the body is cashmere https://www.npeal.com/mens/fur-trim-knitwear/woven-fur-trim-long-coat-navy-blue
 

Nobilis Animus

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That sounds...high. for example, this, from N.Peal, clocks in at roughly a third of that, and the body is cashmere https://www.npeal.com/mens/fur-trim-knitwear/woven-fur-trim-long-coat-navy-blue
I suppose there are different levels, but some of it is definitely materials. For example, that coat has rabbit trim - swap in a Loro Piana cashmere and sheared beaver or the like, and the price will climb.

I'm also thinking in Canadian dollars and taking into account makers. It'll be a bit more if there is a lot of handwork.
 

Sartorium

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Not really so okay with fur, but here are some (although none are quite what you are looking for).
I appreciate that, in a time when people will yell at each other for literally every reason imaginable, you are helping out someone even though you disagree with their pursuit.

I think I'm probably close to agreeing with you on fur. I would stay away from things like sable, mink, chinchilla, etc. But I think anything that is killed for meat (rabbit, shearling) or for pest control (coyote)...what's the point? The animal is dying anyway and the fur will never be the driver of demand. Might as well use every part of the metaphorical buffalo, or you're just causing more waste elsewhere.

I suppose there are different levels, but some of it is definitely materials. For example, that coat has rabbit trim - swap in a Loro Piana cashmere and sheared beaver or the like, and the price will climb.

I'm also thinking in Canadian dollars and taking into account makers. It'll be a bit more if there is a lot of handwork.
Yeah fair enough. For some reason even though I'm in Canada I do all my mental accounting in USD
 
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TheShetlandSweater

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I appreciate that, in a time when people will yell at each other for literally every reason imaginable, you are helping out someone even though you disagree with their pursuit.

I think I'm probably close to agreeing with you on fur. I would stay away from things like sable, mink, chinchilla, etc. But I think anything that is killed for meat (rabbit, shearling) or for pest control (coyote)...what's the point? The animal is dying anyway and the fur will never be the driver of demand. Might as well use every part of the metaphorical buffalo, or you're just causing more waste elsewhere.



Yeah fair enough. For some reason even though I'm in Canada I do all my mental accounting in USD
That's reasonable. I'm certainly more okay with some types of fur than others. However, I also think that not all these animals are the same. For instance, even though people might be killing Coyotes anyway, I could never justify wearing Coyote fur. Coyotes are canines, look a lot like dogs and are similar to dogs in many ways. I think our relationship with canines is quite different than our relationship with sheep and I could never stomach wearing canine fur even if that does mean some will go to "waste".
1603680757208.png


Also not sure how true it is in all these cases that fur won't drive demand. Furs can be sold for a lot and that helps keep trappers in business.

One more point. If you are on the fence about something like fur, I am not sure it makes sense to spend thousands of dollars on something that is fur that you may no longer feel comfortable about in the not so distant future.
 

Sartorium

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That's reasonable. I'm certainly more okay with some types of fur than others. However, I also think that not all these animals are the same. For instance, even though people might be killing Coyotes anyway, I could never justify wearing Coyote fur. Coyotes are canines, look a lot like dogs and are similar to dogs in many ways. I think our relationship with canines is quite different than our relationship with sheep and I could never stomach wearing canine fur even if that does mean some will go to "waste".

Also not sure how true it is in all these cases that fur won't drive demand. Furs can be sold for a lot and that helps keep trappers in business.

One more point. If you are on the fence about something like fur, I am not sure it makes sense to spend thousands of dollars on something that is fur that you may no longer feel comfortable about in the not so distant future.
I think, similar to how I feel about waste, even if I changed my mind or gained new knowledge of the how the fur was harvested that made me uncomfortable supporting it, I would not feel squeamish about things I had already purchased. I try to make the best decisions with the knowledge I have, and update accordingly, but getting upset about the garment at that point wouldn't bring the animals back.

I think, on the coyote point, I wanted an example of a pest animal, but I admit that that's sketchier, and even if they're a declared pest the demand for their pelts might drive people to go out and hunt them that wouldn't otherwise. I was thinking more of hippo leather when I wrote it, which I feel fine with because hippos are giant assholes and people have to kill or be killed, as opposed to something like elephant which I find abhorrent even with the supposed protections in place.

I think e.g. if a polar bear is harassing a settlement, I'd rather the pelt gets put to use than thrown away.
 

TheShetlandSweater

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I think, similar to how I feel about waste, even if I changed my mind or gained new knowledge of the how the fur was harvested that made me uncomfortable supporting it, I would not feel squeamish about things I had already purchased. I try to make the best decisions with the knowledge I have, and update accordingly, but getting upset about the garment at that point wouldn't bring the animals back.

I think, on the coyote point, I wanted an example of a pest animal, but I admit that that's sketchier, and even if they're a declared pest the demand for their pelts might drive people to go out and hunt them that wouldn't otherwise. I was thinking more of hippo leather when I wrote it, which I feel fine with because hippos are giant assholes and people have to kill or be killed, as opposed to something like elephant which I find abhorrent even with the supposed protections in place.

I think e.g. if a polar bear is harassing a settlement, I'd rather the pelt gets put to use than thrown away.
IDK. Hippos' conservation status is vulnerable and same with polar bears. If these animals are a threat to us, I think sometimes it is appropriate to consider what we are doing wrong.

Also, not so sure on the waste point. There is a tendency to think of these things solely in terms of harm, but I am not sure that captures the whole picture. I think harm is an important part of the picture, but there are other things to consider. For example, we wouldn't eat or use the fur of pets that died of natural causes (nor would we use the skin of humans who died of natural causes for warmth) even though not using their body parts in this way would be "wasting" them. If harm was all that mattered, then it would be okay to eat our deceased pets.
 

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