• STYLE. COMMUNITY. GREAT CLOTHING.

    Bored of counting likes on social networks? At Styleforum, you’ll find rousing discussions that go beyond strings of emojis.

    Click Here to join Styleforum's thousands of style enthusiasts today!

Warm overcoats

Jazzthief

Active Member
Joined
Aug 24, 2020
Messages
44
Reaction score
21
Right, and urban environments aren't likely to cause enough wear and tear to parkas, I agree. Sometimes we get a lot of freezing rain in my area though, so wool can be more useful than a parka which may not have taped seams, be breathable, etc.

Anything over 32oz will certainly be quite expensive. I think some of the mobility will come down to cut, as one of my coats is around 40oz and quite warm, but also not very restricting. (it was an officer's tailor, so that helps)

I am not sure about the alpaca, which I've only used for linings, but that coat sounds warm. I'm usually fine with a cashmere sweater and peacoat, personally, until it gets down to around -25c.

One thing I've never understood is the tendency of some to get these great, big coats and then go without a hat, gloves, or scarf. Long socks, lined gloves, and a fur ushanka or similar are all classic and super practical.
What kind of a hat do you wear in the winter?
 

Nobilis Animus

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 25, 2017
Messages
403
Reaction score
272
What kind of a hat do you wear in the winter?
As mentioned, a fur ushanka when the weather is particularly bitter, like -30 or so - mine is made of beaver. On less chilly days, a fur felt hat with tailored clothes, or a wool touque with casual clothes and jeans.

On some days I will go hatless, but only because of my long curls. I'll always wear a cashmere or silk scarf.
 

Jazzthief

Active Member
Joined
Aug 24, 2020
Messages
44
Reaction score
21
As mentioned, a fur ushanka when the weather is particularly bitter, like -30 or so - mine is made of beaver. On less chilly days, a fur felt hat with tailored clothes, or a wool touque with casual clothes and jeans.

On some days I will go hatless, but only because of my long curls. I'll always wear a cashmere or silk scarf.
I also wear an ushanka on very cold days. I was always thinking whether it is formal enough, but pretty much nothing beats its practicallity.
 

FlyingHorker

Distinguished Member
Joined
Apr 27, 2014
Messages
2,432
Reaction score
2,036
Right, and urban environments aren't likely to cause enough wear and tear to parkas, I agree. Sometimes we get a lot of freezing rain in my area though, so wool can be more useful than a parka which may not have taped seams, be breathable, etc.

Anything over 32oz will certainly be quite expensive. I think some of the mobility will come down to cut, as one of my coats is around 40oz and quite warm, but also not very restricting. (it was an officer's tailor, so that helps)

I am not sure about the alpaca, which I've only used for linings, but that coat sounds warm. I'm usually fine with a cashmere sweater and peacoat, personally, until it gets down to around -25c.

One thing I've never understood is the tendency of some to get these great, big coats and then go without a hat, gloves, or scarf. Long socks, lined gloves, and a fur ushanka or similar are all classic and super practical.
Not much rain here, mainly wind. Though I have noticed that most wools are at least a bit water resistant.

Cut does make a difference for mobility as well, mine is a fairly boxy Schott peacoat. I don't notice the bulk when worn, but in terms of pliability and hand feel it's noticeable.

Any pictures of this beast of a 40z coat? It sounds awesome.

I don't know about the alpaca either, was just a literal greatcoat I found being sold, I'd only heard about them being used decades ago.

I agree that gloves and a scarf are a necessity. A proper scarf is most of the warmth for winter IMO, and a hat as well.

Hats I try and avoid simply because they don't look good on me. At most a beanie for me. I've tried ivy caps and they don't work and engulf my head, a ushanka I couldn't pull off.

I learned the lesson on not wearing a beanie when I went for a walk when it was -40C with wind chill. My ears were red for 3 days.
 

Nobilis Animus

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 25, 2017
Messages
403
Reaction score
272
Not much rain here, mainly wind. Though I have noticed that most wools are at least a bit water resistant.

Cut does make a difference for mobility as well, mine is a fairly boxy Schott peacoat. I don't notice the bulk when worn, but in terms of pliability and hand feel it's noticeable.

Any pictures of this beast of a 40z coat? It sounds awesome.

I don't know about the alpaca either, was just a literal greatcoat I found being sold, I'd only heard about them being used decades ago.

I agree that gloves and a scarf are a necessity. A proper scarf is most of the warmth for winter IMO, and a hat as well.

Hats I try and avoid simply because they don't look good on me. At most a beanie for me. I've tried ivy caps and they don't work and engulf my head, a ushanka I couldn't pull off.

I learned the lesson on not wearing a beanie when I went for a walk when it was -40C with wind chill. My ears were red for 3 days.
I don't have any pictures handy, but I could take some if needed. It's an old one, and lined with wool as well.

I've been in -40 too, even worse sometimes. That's about when you need to factor covering your face into the equation - although it's not really cold until spit starts to freeze on the ground.

Even more than ears, I find I need to cover my hands. Shearling mittens are very warm, but the glove versions more practical.
 

FlyingHorker

Distinguished Member
Joined
Apr 27, 2014
Messages
2,432
Reaction score
2,036
I don't have any pictures handy, but I could take some if needed. It's an old one, and lined with wool as well.

I've been in -40 too, even worse sometimes. That's about when you need to factor covering your face into the equation - although it's not really cold until spit starts to freeze on the ground.

Even more than ears, I find I need to cover my hands. Shearling mittens are very warm, but the glove versions more practical.
"Needed" maybe not, I just think it sounds cool. I doubt the majority of us have even seen how thick a 40 oz cloth can look, or how it drapes on someone.

Wherever you live sounds colder than I am. It doesn't get much worse than that here, and that's usually accounting for wind chill.

Agreed, I always cover my hands well before I start breaking out the beanie. A nice hand warmer pocket helps a lot too.
 

Nobilis Animus

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 25, 2017
Messages
403
Reaction score
272
"Needed" maybe not, I just think it sounds cool. I doubt the majority of us have even seen how thick a 40 oz cloth can look, or how it drapes on someone.

Wherever you live sounds colder than I am. It doesn't get much worse than that here, and that's usually accounting for wind chill.

Agreed, I always cover my hands well before I start breaking out the beanie. A nice hand warmer pocket helps a lot too.
Gotcha, really it feels a lot heavier than it looks, but that's because it drapes without many wrinkles because of the weight. Made for a relative in the 60s who knew what he was doing.

I'm in Toronto, so winters here are not too bad, except for the occasional wet snow, but I've lived in Chicago and more northern areas where it gets much colder. When I was a child we could get snowed in often if we were in a country house.

Poor OP, he was probably looking for an ordinary coat with which to get from car to store, and here we are talking about blizzards and frozen hells!
 

amiga505

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 31, 2018
Messages
153
Reaction score
207
One thing I've never understood is the tendency of some to get these great, big coats and then go without a hat, gloves, or scarf. Long socks, lined gloves, and a fur ushanka or similar are all classic and super practical.
it's just that cool dudes don't wear hats )))

seriously though, just like @FlyingHorker above, I can't stand hats of any kind. they do something to my hair (I think it has to do with dry air of winter and static) - after I take a hat off, the hair is all static-slick and sticking to my skull - terrible. I therefore wear scarf and gloves and try to brave it until -10 Celsius, then there's just no way around it. when all is said and done, the heat loss through uncovered head is enormous, some say up to 80%. presently, I have a tweed cap in my collection, but I am considering a proper felt hat. I had to wear ushanka coming of age in Kiev, winters of course were harsher then, and I am thoroughly traumatised by the experience - never again!!! )
 

comrade

Distinguished Member
Joined
May 10, 2005
Messages
7,145
Reaction score
813
Would look much better w/ Raglan sleeves and no pleates in the pockets.
 

amiga505

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 31, 2018
Messages
153
Reaction score
207
Raglan sleeves perhaps, although as is is also pleasing to my eye, but I beg to disagree regarding the pockets - this is a nice detail.
 

jayvee

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 25, 2018
Messages
429
Reaction score
401
For OP, you might be better off getting a decent weight overcoat (minimum 20oz wool fabric) and wearing a lightweight 700 fill down liner under it. I do this with my overcoats (one tweed one alpaca) and it helps a bit but still not as warm as my down woolrich parka. The long legth does very little to keep your legs warm ime.
 

amiga505

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 31, 2018
Messages
153
Reaction score
207
Any recommendations for someone to make a MTO/bespoke duffle coat? preferably UK or EU?
Check Lopez Aragon out, MTO items. They seem to have mostly 500 g coating cloths, but I spotted 800 g navy. I don't own a coat from them myself, but own a few other items, and I am happy with quality.
 

Nobilis Animus

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 25, 2017
Messages
403
Reaction score
272
it's just that cool dudes don't wear hats )))

seriously though, just like @FlyingHorker above, I can't stand hats of any kind. they do something to my hair (I think it has to do with dry air of winter and static) - after I take a hat off, the hair is all static-slick and sticking to my skull - terrible. I therefore wear scarf and gloves and try to brave it until -10 Celsius, then there's just no way around it. when all is said and done, the heat loss through uncovered head is enormous, some say up to 80%. presently, I have a tweed cap in my collection, but I am considering a proper felt hat. I had to wear ushanka coming of age in Kiev, winters of course were harsher then, and I am thoroughly traumatised by the experience - never again!!! )
Personally, I only really pull out a hat when it starts to get very cold for me, and that is usually past -15 or so. It's a combination of living in the city and not having to be exposed to the elements so much and also just being used to it. But I still keep them around for when they're needed.


One thing I forgot to mention is shearling coats and jackets. Good quality shearling is also very warm, although expensive.
 

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by

Featured Sponsor

Most Interesting Fashion Collaboration of 2020

  • JW Anderson x Uniqlo

  • Nigo x Virgil Abloh

  • Converse x Midnight Studios

  • Rick Owens x Champion

  • Barbour x Engineered Garments

  • Adidas x Bed JW Ford

  • Jordan Brand x Dior

  • Billie Eilish x Takashi Murakami

  • Lego x Levi's


Results are only viewable after voting.

Related Threads

Forum statistics

Threads
446,671
Messages
9,661,124
Members
201,882
Latest member
judigokil
Top