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Warm overcoats

Veremund

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Does anyone make warm overcoats anymore? If I do not want a down filled coat, and certainly not a shearling, are there any options of warm and elegant overcoats of medium to long length?
Yes. I have a grey, herringbone Harris Tweed overcoat which is even warmer than usual because it has a quilted internal lining. It’s very similar to the one in this link:
 

comrade

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Melton is heavy and warm.
Loden is very tightly woven and wind resistant and practically water-proof.
Heavy tweeds are warm.
 

Clouseau

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Loden coats. Made in Austria ones. Got two, one by Burberrys (they probably just stuck their name on it as it's made in Austria), and one by Steinbock. Warm and you can wear a jacket under.

Loden.JPG
 

whorishconsumer

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When I lived in Russia, I was fine in layers. A thick wool baselayer, then a thick oxford shirt, and then a sweater, and then even a fairly lightweight piece of outerwear, such as a waxed cotton coat. But if you wanted something heavier and warmer, there are plenty of places that sell heavy overcoats. O'Connell's has a bunch. I imagine things such as polo coats at Ralph Lauren and Brooks Brothers are still made from a heavy cloth.
Why were you in Russia
 

whorishconsumer

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I was dating a woman at the time (an American woman) and we both moved there for work. We were there during the 2011 protests against Putin. Was really quite an experience to see that upfront.
So what you are saying is you are trained in espionage
 

mhip

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On the other side of the coin, I was just outside for 10 minutes, and came back in my office.
I then disrobed and used a cordless leaf blower to dry my short sleeved shirt, which had soaked through.
 

Viral

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I have a very warm overcoat from Polo RL.....it’s the Harrison model with a 3-button covered placket. Super warm for an overcoat - feels like a big warm hug when worn. I even went back and bought the same coat in a different color. If your up for the challenge, you should hunt one down from eBay or the like.

alternatively, Herno makes a nice overcoat with a very slim down membrane on the inside - Looks completely normal when worn but has that down-filled layer inside. I’m still kicking myself for not buying it from when Barney’s had then on sale :(

Good luck on your search!
 

Pandaros

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As someone else intimated, it has to be accepted that down coats surpass traditional overcoats for keeping you warm. A trip to any national gallery to see paintings in winter time will show you the number of layers people had to wear. Take this photograph for example of man dressed for winter - and this is only in Ireland!

Even if you get the heaviest overcoat - and I have one from the Navy - you still have to wear layers.

 

BoomDiggs

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I had one made by Luxire. That may be more effort intensive than some will want to go, though. To help with sizing, I sent them a coat I already owned but did not like. I then picked out my cloth, requested several style changes over the sample coat, and had a trial fitting. I now I have a coat I love.
 

Nobilis Animus

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In case anyone still needed an overcoat for this winter...

Parkas are very insulating, but wool has the advantage of being not only more durable, but also the ability to keep you warm should it get wet. This is the biggest advantage for natural fibres - the only way to replicate its function is to have a waterproof shell on the parka, but even that will be useless if it tears, for example.

The warmest thing is to have a fur coat or an overcoat made with fur lining, and especially a fur collar that can be drawn up around the face, because your breath won't freeze on it. Something like a melton cloth which approaches 32-40oz would also work well with layers. The best option is probably custom, unless there are furriers in your city who can make one up to wear.
 

Kingstonian

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In the U.K. people stopped wearing so much clothing. Raincoats disappeared as folk prefer to take a chance on getting wet and cars are used more than in previous generations. Men walk around in shorts in Winter too.

There are plenty of good overcoats available used for next to nothing.

Standard formal coats in cold places like Russia are dark Crombie overcoats with a fur hat, scarf and gloves.
 

FlyingHorker

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In case anyone still needed an overcoat for this winter...

Parkas are very insulating, but wool has the advantage of being not only more durable, but also the ability to keep you warm should it get wet. This is the biggest advantage for natural fibres - the only way to replicate its function is to have a waterproof shell on the parka, but even that will be useless if it tears, for example.

The warmest thing is to have a fur coat or an overcoat made with fur lining, and especially a fur collar that can be drawn up around the face, because your breath won't freeze on it. Something like a melton cloth which approaches 32-40oz would also work well with layers. The best option is probably custom, unless there are furriers in your city who can make one up to wear.
I'm an overcoat fanboy, but there's a lot of Parkas out there with a highly durable exterior, the possibility of tearing or getting wet not being likely.

I've a peacoat with 32 oz melton wool, and it's not the most pliable material either. 32+ oz cloth is a bit hard to find, and also much more expensive.

I think the only advantage overcoats have over parkas is the aesthetic.

O'Connell's used to have a greatcoat that was whipcord, and lined with thick alpaca fur as well.
 

OldTown

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I'm an overcoat fanboy, but there's a lot of Parkas out there with a highly durable exterior, the possibility of tearing or getting wet not being likely.

I've a peacoat with 32 oz melton wool, and it's not the most pliable material either. 32+ oz cloth is a bit hard to find, and also much more expensive.

I think the only advantage overcoats have over parkas is the aesthetic.

O'Connell's used to have a greatcoat that was whipcord, and lined with thick alpaca fur as well.
I just got a peacoat that fits perfectly this year and it's my favorite piece of clothing I own (probably until next spring anyway).
 

Nobilis Animus

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I'm an overcoat fanboy, but there's a lot of Parkas out there with a highly durable exterior, the possibility of tearing or getting wet not being likely.

I've a peacoat with 32 oz melton wool, and it's not the most pliable material either. 32+ oz cloth is a bit hard to find, and also much more expensive.

I think the only advantage overcoats have over parkas is the aesthetic.

O'Connell's used to have a greatcoat that was whipcord, and lined with thick alpaca fur as well.
Right, and urban environments aren't likely to cause enough wear and tear to parkas, I agree. Sometimes we get a lot of freezing rain in my area though, so wool can be more useful than a parka which may not have taped seams, be breathable, etc.

Anything over 32oz will certainly be quite expensive. I think some of the mobility will come down to cut, as one of my coats is around 40oz and quite warm, but also not very restricting. (it was an officer's tailor, so that helps)

I am not sure about the alpaca, which I've only used for linings, but that coat sounds warm. I'm usually fine with a cashmere sweater and peacoat, personally, until it gets down to around -25c.

One thing I've never understood is the tendency of some to get these great, big coats and then go without a hat, gloves, or scarf. Long socks, lined gloves, and a fur ushanka or similar are all classic and super practical.
 

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