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Warm overcoats

Knurt

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Does anyone make warm overcoats anymore? If I do not want a down filled coat, and certainly not a shearling, are there any options of warm and elegant overcoats of medium to long length?
 

dieworkwear

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most places that sell suits will have overcoats
 

Knurt

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But not thick and warm overcoats that compete with downfilled versions?
 

amiga505

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I have not been in the field long enough to make such a claim myself, but Raphael Schneider from Gentleman's Gazette mentioned in a recent video that heaviness of the overcoats has steadily declined over the years and that most coats sold today as RTW are pretty thin affairs (to the validity of the latter claim I think I can myself attest). so I suppose you either go to a tailor and pick the proper coating cloth to your liking or go vintage - Etsy and eBay have tons of options. a great variety of details is an added bonus in my opinion: single-breasted, double-breasted, Ulster collars, action backs etc. also, keep an eye on the Classifieds section of this forum, here are few examples currently on offer:

 

TimothyF

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You can:
1. Buy vintage; for example military overcoats from WWII era were heavy and functional
2. Get it custom made; select hearty cloths of 25+ oz
3. Look through RTW offerings from reputable retailers such as O'Connell's in US, Cordings in UK. If cloth weight is not in description, ask; again, I think you need at least 25 oz fabric.
 

Knurt

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Thanks. I saw Schneider’s post. Honestly, I find sourcing such used coats on eBay difficult. It is hard to know how warm and insulated they are. It is not only the cloth that meets the world that matter, but the whole construction. I posted recently about a Loro Piana cashmere cloth coat I bought, and that is indeed warmer than many current coats. But it is not really one for minus ten or twenty celcius.
 

Proleet

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Traditional overcoats will not do as well as more technical/down filled coats in say -20c but I personally use a 23oz Huddersfield cloth DB overcoat and it gets me through NYC winters quite well.
 

TimothyF

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Thanks. I saw Schneider’s post. Honestly, I find sourcing such used coats on eBay difficult. It is hard to know how warm and insulated they are. It is not only the cloth that meets the world that matter, but the whole construction. I posted recently about a Loro Piana cashmere cloth coat I bought, and that is indeed warmer than many current coats. But it is not really one for minus ten or twenty celcius.
You can always go to a vintage clothing store and try on the coat yourself. The canvassing and lining differences between coats will have minimal impact on how warm the coat is, so it really comes down to the weight, the weave, the cut, single- vs. double-breasted... factors like these.
 

dieworkwear

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But not thick and warm overcoats that compete with downfilled versions?
Overcoats don't compete with high-quality down. There's a reason why Edmund Hillary scaled Everest in a down parka and not an overcoat.
 

Knurt

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Overcoats don't compete with high-quality down. There's a reason why Edmund Hillary scaled Everest in a down parka and not an overcoat.
Yes, and for the same reason I own a down jacket. But I should be able to go out in the winter morning, dressed in a thickish suit/jacket suitable to heated indoor work, and have on only a warm coat on the outside?
 

dieworkwear

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Yes, and for the same reason I own a down jacket. But I should be able to go out in the winter morning, dressed in a thickish suit/jacket suitable to heated indoor work, and have on only a warm coat on the outside?
When I lived in Russia, I was fine in layers. A thick wool baselayer, then a thick oxford shirt, and then a sweater, and then even a fairly lightweight piece of outerwear, such as a waxed cotton coat. But if you wanted something heavier and warmer, there are plenty of places that sell heavy overcoats. O'Connell's has a bunch. I imagine things such as polo coats at Ralph Lauren and Brooks Brothers are still made from a heavy cloth.
 

comrade

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When I lived in Chicago in the 80s I wore a 32 oz British Warm and an Invertere greatcoat. The only place that I
know in the US that has a wide selection of traditional (heavy) overcoats is O'Connells in Buffalo (where else?)

 

Knurt

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When I lived in Russia, I was fine in layers. A thick wool baselayer, then a thick oxford shirt, and then a sweater, and then even a fairly lightweight piece of outerwear, such as a waxed cotton coat. But if you wanted something heavier and warmer, there are plenty of places that sell heavy overcoats. O'Connell's has a bunch. I imagine things such as polo coats at Ralph Lauren and Brooks Brothers are still made from a heavy cloth.
I can always add layers, but I tend to look for the easy way.
 

bdavro23

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There are plenty of MTM/ Custom clothiers who would be happy to make you an overcoat that meets your requirements. The real issue is what do you want to pay for it? The most insulating fibers are also the most expensive, so there is a trade off between weight and warmth. If you want the warmest (non-insulated, natural fiber) coat you can get, it will likely be heavy cashmere, and it will be expensive for obvious reasons.
 

Waldo Jeffers

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Density of weave is factor

some overcoats are kind of fluffy and the wind just rips right through them

I don’t really know how you quantify this though

if you see coats in person it’s pretty easy to tell
 

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