Want a career involving investments, which Graduate Degree?

Discussion in 'Business, Careers & Education' started by kwright11, Jul 18, 2011.

  1. austinite

    austinite Well-Known Member

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    I am almost certain that the answer to this is yes. As a generalist degree MBA pretty much destroys everything else, and it's also the standard path to several of the high demand careers like IB. To me, your interests don't appear focused enough to warrant a masters (nothing wrong with this), but I could be misreading it.
     


  2. swaggerisaliability

    swaggerisaliability Senior member

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    Like other posters have noted, "investments" is very broad. For the quant-heavy hedge funds that do algorithmic trading, a technical PhD in math/CS/physics would be best, and for the more value-oriented hedge funds, an MBA would suffice (and you don't even really need it).
     


  3. kwright11

    kwright11 Active Member

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    For discussion sake, let's narrow the goal down to Investment Banking in Houston for example. It sounds like getting an MBA would still be the best choice?
     


  4. HRoi

    HRoi Senior member

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    It still amazes me, 10 years out of b-school, how much attention I-banking still generates. The job (and more importantly, the lifestyle) isn't for everybody. In fact, I'll go on a limb and say it's not for most people.

    Get work experience and enroll in a top MBA program. And then make every effort to get an IB internship after first year. IIRC, more than 50% of my classmates with an I-banking internship chose to go into a different field full time.

    Ps - saying you want to do i-banking in Houston is seriously limiting yourself. Do some research on how many firms actually have a presence (and recruit) there
     
    Last edited: Jul 19, 2011


  5. Pennglock

    Pennglock Senior member

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    If you're set on Houston as a location, look into trading jobs with the big energy firms.
     


  6. Joffrey

    Joffrey Senior member

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    If you want to remain in Texas so badly why not look at energy trading?
     


  7. kwright11

    kwright11 Active Member

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    Don't really know anything about it truthfully. Like i've said, I'm very open at this point. What would energy trading involve exactly?
     


  8. Joffrey

    Joffrey Senior member

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    You should seriously go and buy some books. Books on the trading/investment/finance industries. Liars Poker is a good one. It's not technical at all and it's dated but it's a fun first read for some insight in the field (broadly). I don't have any books to suggest on energy/commodities trading but all the investment companies, energy companies (Chevron, Exxon) and commodities firms (Trafigura) have trading arms in Houston (for energy), Geneva and many other major cities. Go to Amazon and look up books on the industries. I don't particularly care to do it for you. Go to websites like Vault.com and Glassdoor.com and look up firms you find and get ideas from their reviews and company overviews.

    Anyway to answer your question broadly (and someone else can provide better details) energy/commodity traders buy and sell energy/commodities. Most usually have storage facilities where they will store the cocoa (chocolate), oil, steel, copper until they feel like getting rid of it. There was a big story about a trader that cornered the cocoa market earlier this year or late last year. Must've made a killing with the Ivory Coast debacle.
     
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2011


  9. DaveB

    DaveB Senior member

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    +1 to Liar's Poker, I enjoyed it and I have 0 interest in trading
     


  10. mintyfresh

    mintyfresh Senior member

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    If you're interested in IB - read Barbarians at the Gate.

    For investing/hedge funds - a recent story that was a great, easy read - The Big short.
     
    Last edited: Jul 26, 2011


  11. Quadcammer

    Quadcammer Senior member

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    disagree with the first part.

    If you're interested in IB, open an excel spreadsheet, type in some numbers, and then modify those numbers from 8am to about 11pm.

    Do this for a week. If you haven't lost your mind, welcome, you can consider an IB analyst job.
     


  12. cam

    cam Member

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    Don't spend on a degree. Network your ass off and get a job working. Investment banking is a small, small world and all you do is valuation modeling so any learning besides learning the basic models is a waste of time. You should be working on getting interviews at the firms, not on being overqualified for them.

    If you want to do investments, like work on portfolios at investment companies and be more quantish, then start your CFA level 1 and network!!!

    In either case, someone from your college should have had a desirable position somewhere and you can ask them for their perspective, and they might even go as far as helping you into the industry. Don't waste time and money hiding from the need to network.
     




  13. karmaguy

    karmaguy Senior member

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    don't go for a masters in econ, it's basically just for people who want a PhD in econ but have 0 math skills aka you learn how to do all the math required for a PhD in econ.
     


  14. phreak

    phreak Senior member

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    No, this is wrong ime. Check out an 'applied economics' program; it's really math intensive. These programs are not theoretical and are designed to be terminal degrees.
     


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