1. Welcome to the new Styleforum!

    We hope you’re as excited as we are to hang out in the new place. There are more new features that we’ll announce in the near future, but for now we hope you’ll enjoy the new site.

    We are currently fine-tuning the forum for your browsing pleasure, so bear with any lingering dust as we work to make Styleforum even more awesome than it was.

    Oh, and don’t forget to head over to the Styleforum Journal, because we’re giving away two pairs of Carmina shoes to celebrate our move!

    Please address any questions about using the new forum to support@styleforum.net

    Cheers,

    The Styleforum Team

    Dismiss Notice

Vintage Dress shoe appreciation, tips, maintenance and advice

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by smfdoc, Jul 14, 2016.

  1. meister

    meister Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,321
    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2007
    

    AE is locked into that mysterious narrow 5 last so you have to go up a 1/2 size to fit shoes at the normal English/EUR size and width.
     
  2. smfdoc

    smfdoc Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,877
    Joined:
    May 25, 2015
    Location:
    Los Angeles. "Swimmin' pools; movie stars."
    David at the vcleat.com blog has a nice collection of different Florsheim long wing styles, including the 97625 as seen below. The 97625 was originally a Royal Imperial that was rebadged in the late 1990s as an Imperial. This hand stained brown long wing does appear on Ebay with some regularity.

    [​IMG]

    I recently found a pair of Florsheim Imperials and was surprised to see the style number of 97725 as opposed to 97625. The second 7 is difficult to read, but on inspection of the shoe it is clearly there and this is where the mystery begins. Neither David nor I have ever heard of the 97725. This particular shoe appears to have been made in July 1999, as indicated by the GJ after the style number.

    [​IMG]

    We're not sure if this is some rare style or simply some error in marking at the factory. It is most likely that I will never know. In any case, I was quite happy to find the shoe as a brown Florsheim long wing was on my list. I stripped them with Renomat, conditioned and then applied AE dark brown shoe cream as that matched the color of the shoe when it was purchased. This as followed by some wax and they are ready to go.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Oct 26, 2016
    1 person likes this.
  3. meister

    meister Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,321
    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2007
    
    Is dis lurv... is did lurv... dat I'm feelin'? Love that 21c vibe in the pointy last.
     
    Last edited: Oct 27, 2016
  4. smfdoc

    smfdoc Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,877
    Joined:
    May 25, 2015
    Location:
    Los Angeles. "Swimmin' pools; movie stars."
    Maiden voyage of the Florsheim 97725 in the wild.

    [​IMG]
     
    2 people like this.
  5. mreams99

    mreams99 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,336
    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2015
    Location:
    Ohio
    [​IMG]
    What do you call a chukka when it has no laces?
    These were made by Foot Joy.
     
  6. MattRiv

    MattRiv Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,154
    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2015
    I've got some loafers from Foot Joy that are very well made.

    [​IMG]
     
    1 person likes this.
  7. petejefferson

    petejefferson New Member

    Messages:
    1
    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2016
    Hey everyone, long time lurker but first time poster. For a while I've wanted to try my hand at restoring an old pair of shoes so I'm looking for just the right candidate. I prefer loafers, and I have a wide foot (9.5 E or EE typically), any ideas what I should look out for? I see lots of V-cleat Florsheims on eBay, but finding a nice looking pair of loafers can be difficult and I don't know exactly what to look for.
     
  8. smfdoc

    smfdoc Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,877
    Joined:
    May 25, 2015
    Location:
    Los Angeles. "Swimmin' pools; movie stars."
    Sorry, but that is outside my expertise and others may be able to make a suggestion. The only loafer in my house, according to my wife, is ME. I will stick with the vintage oxfords.

    [​IMG]
     
  9. makewayhomer

    makewayhomer Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,661
    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2009
    1 person likes this.
  10. AHS

    AHS Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    667
    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2009
    Location:
    San Francisco
    Last edited: Oct 28, 2016
  11. smfdoc

    smfdoc Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,877
    Joined:
    May 25, 2015
    Location:
    Los Angeles. "Swimmin' pools; movie stars."
    Another PSA. In my quest for more vintage shoes I collected these 93602 and 96204 Florsheims made in 1968 and 1969. They are 6E in size and, for some reason, seem a bit small for my 11 EEE foot. It is good to see shoes of this age in such great condition. Any 6E forum members are welcome to PM me. Or maybe a forum member who has a son of this size.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  12. MattRiv

    MattRiv Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,154
    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2015
    Last edited: Oct 29, 2016
  13. smfdoc

    smfdoc Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,877
    Joined:
    May 25, 2015
    Location:
    Los Angeles. "Swimmin' pools; movie stars."
  14. smfdoc

    smfdoc Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,877
    Joined:
    May 25, 2015
    Location:
    Los Angeles. "Swimmin' pools; movie stars."
    The search for vintage can lead one to search high and low and occasionally spend a few dollars on the roll of the dice. Such was the case when I bought these made in USA shoes sold by Sears "Where America shops." Sears did sell some cordovan shoes made by Hanover and the bad photos were sufficient for me to spend a few bucks on the chance they may be shell. Well, no such luck. Their appearance was produced by "Corfam", a synthetic leather made by DuPont. Since you may encounter Corfam in your own searches, this seemed like a great opportunity to pass on some information.

    [​IMG]

    The leather substitute
    In the mid-1960s, chemical giant DuPont invested millions in the promotion of Corfam, a synthetic substitute for leather. But although Corfam was launched in 1963, it had been conceived many years before. Indeed, in the late 1930s researchers at DuPont had discovered ways to make leather-like materials and had experimented with various possible uses. One of the most obvious uses was for footwear. Demographic trends were starting to indicate that the global population was increasing at such a rate that there would soon be a demand for footwear from non-animal sources.

    DuPont therefore believed the world would greet the arrival of their hardwearing, shine-preserving, water-repelling leather look-a-like. And indeed, when the product made its first public appearance at the Chicago Shoe Show in the autumn of 1963, it was greeted enthusiastically.

    All DuPont had to do now was to find out where exactly Corfam’s place in the footwear market would be. The company had predicted that by 1984, a quarter of US shoes would be made from Corfam, but to do that it would first need to carve a niche for itself. In the United States of 1963, the footwear market could be divided into the following percentages:

    • 47 per cent Women’s shoes
    • 20 per cent Children’s shoes
    • 18 per cent Men’s shoes
    • 15 per cent Athletic footwear/Other
    Clearly if Corfam was to become as big as it could be, it would need to be used by manufacturers of women’s shoes. It soon became clear, however, that the female shoe market was itself divided – between comfy, everyday shoes and ‘fashion’ shoes made for special occasions.
    For all Corfam’s strengths, it was not as flexible or ‘skin-like’ as ordinary leather, and therefore was not suited for those shoes designed for comfort or everyday use. So fashion shoes seemed to be the solution. And yet, even here there was a problem. A synthetic material called polyvinyl chloride (now known to us as PVC) was fast becoming popular owing to its extreme low cost.
    Vinyl shoes, which could be colored or embossed very easily, were perfect for women looking for a ‘throwaway’ pair which may be worn once or twice at special occasions before being discarded.

    Furthermore, the leather industry was keen to dampen the appeal of Corfam by lowering its prices and improving quality. This factor, combined with the growing popularity of vinyl shoes, led to DuPont’s announcement in March 1971 that they were to withdraw Corfam. On 11 April 1971, the New York Times referred to Corfam as ‘Du Pont’s $100 million Edsel.’
     
    1 person likes this.
  15. Allen Dreadmon

    Allen Dreadmon Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    739
    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2013
    Location:
    Toronto
    I'm interested in a picking up a pair of vintage Hanover shell PTBs. I have never tried Hanovers before. Should I size the same as my Florsheims?

    Thanks.
     
  16. smfdoc

    smfdoc Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,877
    Joined:
    May 25, 2015
    Location:
    Los Angeles. "Swimmin' pools; movie stars."
    I have shell and calf Florsheims and calf Hanovers. I find them all to fit the same, with shell being a tad looser as it cannot be pulled as tightly as calf during construction. I find them both to be true to size for me.
     
  17. Allen Dreadmon

    Allen Dreadmon Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    739
    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2013
    Location:
    Toronto
    Thank you for the quick reply! Any pointers on determining the year of production? The pair I'm looking at says "HANOVER Since 1899" on the sole and "insole".
     
  18. smfdoc

    smfdoc Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,877
    Joined:
    May 25, 2015
    Location:
    Los Angeles. "Swimmin' pools; movie stars."
     
  19. Smith Premier

    Smith Premier Member

    Messages:
    11
    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2016
    Location:
    Finland
    I have been an occasional lurker around here, but finding this interesting thread made me rush to register. Shoes posted on this thread have been simply gorgeous!

    Vintage shoes originally caught my interest some years ago because of their aesthetics and style, as well as of the opportunity to find very good quality at affordable prices on ebay. Well, as we all know, the finds you make on ebay don´t always turn out out to be as good as you hoped for: smelly shoes, bad fit, wrong size marked by the seller, defects, etc.

    After a learning curve and collecting by aid of trial and error, I have now some half a dozen vintage shoes in my collection, and in use of course.

    These Dack´s were made in Canada somewhere around the end of 50´s or early 60´s, and I am really happy about how well they have been maintained by their original owner, as they are still in perfect condition. These were custom made, but they fit me very well. I consider these to be my parade shoes.

    [​IMG]

    These spade shoes have no manufacturers name on them, but according to the well-informed seller from whom I bought these on ebay, it´s apparently a pair made by Connolly´s for Thom Mcan in the 1940´s. I´m impressed about the rock-solid structure and quality of the leather. They fit very nicely and are comfortable on the feet. Then again, they do look a bit old-fashioned. But next time I get a chance to wear my dad´s old three-piece pinstripe suit, this pair will get a chance to get out of the closet and see some action, too.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2016
    2 people like this.
  20. smfdoc

    smfdoc Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,877
    Joined:
    May 25, 2015
    Location:
    Los Angeles. "Swimmin' pools; movie stars."
    
    Great shoes and welcome to the forum and the thread. Share pictures and info on you other shoes when the occasion allows.
     

Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by