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friendlygoz

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I was sitting in my mother's house in London, Ontario late yesterday afternoon when I received a text from Quantum who had a theory I might be interested in this pair. I bought them immediately. They are without doubt the rarest John McHales that I have ever seen. They date to the early 50’s. Canadian vintage shell shoes just don’t exist. I couldn’t believe my eyes when I saw this pair. I will post more pictures and research when they arrive. Thanks Quan!
Those are amazing... wow.
 

friendlygoz

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My world has crumbled. I've never seen or even heard of Canadian shell. Now I have to find myself a pair.
You swore off vintage shell. Are you off the wagon?
 

wasmisterfu

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Not trying to steal anyone's thunder, but in terms of science and using stripping agents, @wasmisterfu is likely the master. He used a whole can of varnish for one of the shoe revival challenges.
Yeah, master is not the word I’d use. Perhaps something more akin to “daredevil”.

First, I believe both @smfdoc and @Shoonoob are at least as, and very like more, experienced than I am when it come to this topic.

That said, acetone should be your go-to when doing a full strip. Something like varnish remover is only needed when removing the primary finish on something PU coated like Polished Cobbler (you can do it with just acetone, but it will take twice as long). Whatever you do, don’t use varnish remover on regular calf or shell, or you might be very sad.

Back to discussing acetone: the thing you need to watch out for is that acetone is a strong solvent, and will strip oils out of leather. Make sure to rehydrate the leather after stripping (you can dye, then thoroughly hydrate with an oil heavy conditioner - but you’ll want to do that before you apply any kind of heavier finish).

The other solvent that works pretty effectively, and fully evaporates, and is especially good for removing deep seated oil stains, is naphtha. I’d use that for spot issues. Obviously, use both with gloves (that won’t dissolve), in very well ventilated location (e.g. outdoors) and be careful not to set yourself on fire, as that’d be a rather unfortunate end to your shoe science session.
 

stook1

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Yeah, master is not the word I’d use. Perhaps something more akin to “daredevil”.

First, I believe both @smfdoc and @Shoonoob are at least as, and very like more, experienced than I am when it come to this topic.

That said, acetone should be your go-to when doing a full strip. Something like varnish remover is only needed when removing the primary finish on something PU coated like Polished Cobbler (you can do it with just acetone, but it will take twice as long). Whatever you do, don’t use varnish remover on regular calf or shell, or you might be very sad.

Back to discussing acetone: the thing you need to watch out for is that acetone is a strong solvent, and will strip oils out of leather. Make sure to rehydrate the leather after stripping (you can dye, then thoroughly hydrate with an oil heavy conditioner - but you’ll want to do that before you apply any kind of heavier finish).

The other solvent that works pretty effectively, and fully evaporates, and is especially good for removing deep seated oil stains, is naphtha. I’d use that for spot issues. Obviously, use both with gloves (that won’t dissolve), in very well ventilated location (e.g. outdoors) and be careful not to set yourself on fire, as that’d be a rather unfortunate end to your shoe science session.
Good input, thanks! Ever use naptha on CXL? Have a spot on a vamp from raw chicken juice.
 

friendlygoz

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Wore my modded 93602s today. Didn’t get a chance for an in-action shot.
CB829FD4-897B-41E6-86D9-BCE3960BD14B.jpeg
56BE855D-C32E-49A2-A701-0983182B6DAC.jpeg
 

wasmisterfu

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Good input, thanks! Ever use naptha on CXL? Have a spot on a vamp from raw chicken juice.
1. Yes I have, test in an inconspicuous location first, and (for that purpose) it’s a dab application. Be prepared to touch up with a closely matched cream polish. Think of it like when you use one of those isopropyl based suit and tie spot cleaners... dab, not wipe.

2. Raw chicken juice? So ewwwwwy.
 

Vincent George

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For some reason, Florsheim did not make a lot of their models in EEE width. Including the Golden Harvest. However, Florsheim would make custom sizes for customers.

For the longest time, I was betting on finding a pair in 9E. I bought a pair in 9.5E that I eventually sent to Florida to @Quantum17 .

This custom made pair is marked as 9eee. Which if TTS, too big for me. I rolled the dice, and they actually fit like 8.5eee, which is my size. A cobbler did a great job rebuilding with JR soles, toe taps, and cat paw heels.

View attachment 1625636View attachment 1625637
Nicely done. I’m a 10eee and I agree that Florsheims don’t pop up quite that often in triple wide.
 

stook1

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1. Yes I have, test in an inconspicuous location first, and (for that purpose) it’s a dab application. Be prepared to touch up with a closely matched cream polish. Think of it like when you use one of those isopropyl based suit and tie spot cleaners... dab, not wipe.

2. Raw chicken juice? So ewwwwwy.
Thanks! I will give it a try.

Early pandemic era meat stockpiling...

By the way, I almost called your attention to a newer pair of Lloyds that were confusing me but I figured it out. So thanks for an ancient post of yours on the topic that confirmed I was looking at a PC pair. You also implied that the Lloyd doesn't appear in the catalogs... Seems odd but I am going with it as the explanation for... wait for it... why I couldn't find this pair in the catalogs.
 

wasmisterfu

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Thanks! I will give it a try.

Early pandemic era meat stockpiling...

By the way, I almost called your attention to a newer pair of Lloyds that were confusing me but I figured it out. So thanks for an ancient post of yours on the topic that confirmed I was looking at a PC pair. You also implied that the Lloyd doesn't appear in the catalogs... Seems odd but I am going with it as the explanation for... wait for it... why I couldn't find this pair in the catalogs.
I’ll take your word for it that I wrote an earlier post about the Lloyd... I’m afraid that all the solvents I’ve inhaled have taken their toll. But it was all for the shoe science, so a few memories and a bit of cognitive function is but a small price to pay.
 

wasmisterfu

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Still unsure what company these are. One website says Hanover made Bostonians.

Nevertheless, they're gorgeous cordovan lwb that fit me perfectly.

View attachment 1625847

View attachment 1625848View attachment 1625849
Hanover and Bostonian were effectively merged when both were acquired by Clark’s (with Hanover’s manufacturing footprint being the dominant component - everything Bostonian miUSA was effectively branding on Hanover produced shoes).
 

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