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suitforcourt

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MacNeils in shell. Wishing you all a great weekend ahead.

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Hotel Cali

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I remember seeing that post. I presume you used Acetone to strip them. What did you use for the burgundy/#8 dye? I have used Fiebings and Angelus. I’m sure one of them makes a #8 type color.

OR, maybe I should try a different color Shell! I have many #8. Perhaps it’s time for something different.
I would just slap on some red dye. It will turn out #8 / burgundy.
 

stook1

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I remember seeing that post. I presume you used Acetone to strip them. What did you use for the burgundy/#8 dye? I have used Fiebings and Angelus. I’m sure one of them makes a #8 type color.

OR, maybe I should try a different color Shell! I have many #8. Perhaps it’s time for something different.
Keep in mind that for my pair I was dealing with some additional problems with the finish - not just the color - so I am not sure you will need to do the full process. Here is what I did in a nutshell. It took me a couple of hours (2 or 3 ish).

1. Quick brush
2. Acetone with a microfiber to strip the coating off the shell
3. Sand the damaged panels - I used 3000 grit and followed with 5000 grit using Bick4 for a wet sand
4. Using alcohol based Angelus dye, I did a custom mix using brown and oxblood dye colors (this is just what I had on hand, not suggesting this is the "best" option). As I adjusted the mix with a dropper I tested dots of it on a white paper to get a better sense of how it looked. It's an inexact science. I also heavily cut the dye concentration with isopropyl alcohol so that I could careful modulate the dye upon application (probably at least 50% cut). I ended up having to produce two batches of custom dye since I didn't make enough the first time. Don't make that mistake, lol, it killed an extra 20 minutes. I'll have to page through pics but the reason that I decided to dye this pair was because the panels had faded in a weird way. I love color variation but it just didn't look right to me. The color I ended up with is pretty close to a more typical / older color 8. Keep in mind that Red based colors (like oxblood) tend to be somewhat overpowering so just be careful with your mix and test it out before applying.
5. I then applied the dye mix use one of the dye dauber things. I'd actually never used one of those before and had previously always used brushes. The dauber worked fine. The brushes work fine too. Not sure I have preference but with any dye work it's best to go slowly. I ended up doing, I think, 3 coats?? Honestly cannot recall but this will be dependent on coverage, the color you want, and the dye concentration (obviously).
6. I then let the dye dry. Some people recommend waiting a day or so... I waited about 30 minutes. What can I say, impatience is a virtue. I went over them with 2 medium/heavy coats of Bick4 then scrubbed them with a microfiber to try to remove any dye that was sitting on the surface of the shell. Much to my surprise, I had no dye loss -- that's atypical in my limited experience but perhaps a difference in how shell (older shell at least) absorbs dye. Not sure.
7. Let the Bick4 dry for a bit. Then brushed. Already looking good!
8. Thin coat of VSC just because...brush...
9. Thin coat of Collonil 1909... done!
 

Nealjpage

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How do you guys condition suede? I have a vintage suede watch band that needs some moisturizing. What's the best way to do that? Bick 4 on the back?
 

smfdoc

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I am sitting around the house, doing some work and waiting for my Florsheims to be delivered from Wyatt & Dad. I hear a truck! I hear brakes!! There is man in short pants with a box heading to my house!!! I start running in circles, doing "zoomies" around the room. Oh boy, oh boy, oh boy, they are HERE!!!!

IMG_0301.jpg


He delivered something for the wife for mother's day. :brick:
 

JFWR

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Keep in mind that for my pair I was dealing with some additional problems with the finish - not just the color - so I am not sure you will need to do the full process. Here is what I did in a nutshell. It took me a couple of hours (2 or 3 ish).

1. Quick brush
2. Acetone with a microfiber to strip the coating off the shell
3. Sand the damaged panels - I used 3000 grit and followed with 5000 grit using Bick4 for a wet sand
4. Using alcohol based Angelus dye, I did a custom mix using brown and oxblood dye colors (this is just what I had on hand, not suggesting this is the "best" option). As I adjusted the mix with a dropper I tested dots of it on a white paper to get a better sense of how it looked. It's an inexact science. I also heavily cut the dye concentration with isopropyl alcohol so that I could careful modulate the dye upon application (probably at least 50% cut). I ended up having to produce two batches of custom dye since I didn't make enough the first time. Don't make that mistake, lol, it killed an extra 20 minutes. I'll have to page through pics but the reason that I decided to dye this pair was because the panels had faded in a weird way. I love color variation but it just didn't look right to me. The color I ended up with is pretty close to a more typical / older color 8. Keep in mind that Red based colors (like oxblood) tend to be somewhat overpowering so just be careful with your mix and test it out before applying.
5. I then applied the dye mix use one of the dye dauber things. I'd actually never used one of those before and had previously always used brushes. The dauber worked fine. The brushes work fine too. Not sure I have preference but with any dye work it's best to go slowly. I ended up doing, I think, 3 coats?? Honestly cannot recall but this will be dependent on coverage, the color you want, and the dye concentration (obviously).
6. I then let the dye dry. Some people recommend waiting a day or so... I waited about 30 minutes. What can I say, impatience is a virtue. I went over them with 2 medium/heavy coats of Bick4 then scrubbed them with a microfiber to try to remove any dye that was sitting on the surface of the shell. Much to my surprise, I had no dye loss -- that's atypical in my limited experience but perhaps a difference in how shell (older shell at least) absorbs dye. Not sure.
7. Let the Bick4 dry for a bit. Then brushed. Already looking good!
8. Thin coat of VSC just because...brush...
9. Thin coat of Collonil 1909... done!
I would've thought neetsfoot oil would've been suggested due to how dry the shell must've become from the dying process. Is the shell feeling sufficiently moisturized?
 

stook1

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I would've thought neetsfoot oil would've been suggested due to how dry the shell must've become from the dying process. Is the shell feeling sufficiently moisturized?
Nah, they're fine. You can tell from the pics. Keep in mind that pair of AEs were old but not like "50 years old" old. I had also done a light treatment with neatsfoot earlier in the whole saga of these shoes. Long story short - not necessary - at least not in this circumstance.
 

sam67

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Did the AE 9 last of today exist in 1982-83? These are 2669, Claytons, and tight on my right foot and loose on my left, 10.5D. Frustrating. I'll probably try to resell on ebay.

Is there a loafer 'solution'? I guess just trial and error.

1620430765202.png
 

JFWR

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Did the AE 9 last of today exist in 1982-83? These are 2669, Claytons, and tight on my right foot and loose on my left, 10.5D. Frustrating. I'll probably try to resell on ebay.

Is there a loafer 'solution'? I guess just trial and error.

View attachment 1606451
Loafers are the hardest shoes to size, I've always found.
 

Quantum17

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I have always wanted to write a side by side comparison between 60s vs 70s vs 80s iconic Florsheim 93602. I promised myself once I could collect all three decades in NOS, I’d sit down, take out the magnifying glass and start taking notes.

Recently, I was fortunate to acquire a 60s NOS 93602 which ended the treasure hunt. I also received a 70s NOS pair from @vestbash

Having the goods, I yet couldn’t find leisure time to appreciate and write. Hopefully sometime later in the summer. For now, a quick preview of recent acquisition. Presenting 1967 and 1975 Florsheim 93602s.

Edit: I got 70s and 80s mixed up yet again, and have edited accordingly.
2EC0344A-5765-489A-945C-08AD8D4C1873.jpeg
 
Last edited:

Hotel Cali

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I have always wanted to write a side by side comparison between 60s vs 70s vs 80s iconic Florsheim 93602. I promised myself once I could collect all three decades in NOS, I’d sit down, take out the magnifying glass and start taking notes.

Recently, I was fortunate to acquire a 60s NOS 93602 which ended the treasure hunt. Even more exciting, I also received another 80s NOS pair. This 80s pair is special since it’s my birth year and I can’t pass (Thank you @vestbash).

Having the goods, I yet couldn’t find leisure time to appreciate and write. Hopefully sometime later in the summer. For now, a quick preview of recent acquisition. Presenting 1967 and 1985 Florsheim 93602s.View attachment 1606507
You should also get a 1990s model 97625 as part of the comparison. Maybe I can lend you my NOS 97625 for the compare.
 

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