Viberg boots: Lasting and soling - Part 2 of 3

Discussion in 'Streetwear and Denim' started by LA Guy, Sep 25, 2013.

  1. LA Guy

    LA Guy Opposite Santa Staff Member Admin Moderator

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    A little while ago, I posted about the making of a pair of Viberg boots, here

    Today, I present to you, a picture book of the lasting and soling of the boots. This should give you a good idea of the effort and time to go from a piece of leather to the boots that you wear on your feet. (All pictures courtesy of Guy Ferguson).

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    Upper fresh out of the steamer (around 120 degrees).

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    Putting in the leather heel counter.

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    Pinching and stretching the upper to prepare it for the pullover machine.

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    The pullover machine forms the upper around the last and tacks in nails on either side to hold it in place.

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    Hand lasting and nailing the upper.

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    Trimming and splitting the upper.

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    Wiping in and nailing the heel.

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    Hammering the counter to smooth out any inconsistencies.

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    A coated, stainless steel shank and specialized foam insert are applied.

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    The air pressured sole press sticks the first midsole.

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    It is then nailed to the insole by hand. The steel base of the lasts keeps the nails from penetrating the interior of the boot.

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    The vamp is glued to the liner and midsole.

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    Wiper plates form the shape of the toe around the last while heat activates the glue.

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    The rest of the vamp must be formed manually. This machine also trims some of the excess upper with a blade from below.

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    Because the toe is wiped in by a machine we measure all the toe caps to ensure the distance is consistent on each pair.

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    Hand trimming the upper and first midsole.

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    The first midsole is stitched is stitched to the vamp upper.

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    Rough sanding and inspection by Glen Viberg.

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    Nailing the midsole to the heel.

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    This is what a finished midsole looks like before a second midsole, runner, or outsole is attached.

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    Glue is applied to the first midsole.

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    After the second midsole is glued and trimmed a rubber runner, or slip sole is applied (only for boots with a wedge sole unit).

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    The upper, two midsoles and the runner being compressed in the sole press.

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    A 5-in-1, cranked by hand, further seals the edges after the sole press.

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    The runner is trimmed by hand on the same machine.

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    The runner and second midsole are stitched 360 degrees to the first midsole and vamp upper.

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    Sanding the Vibram 2060 outsole.

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    Applying glue to the runner.

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    The sole heater activates the glue and prepares the outsole to be stuck.

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    Placing the outsole.

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    The last trip to the sole press.

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    Trimming the outsole.

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    Awaiting sanding and finishing.
     
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2013


  2. Distorbiant

    Distorbiant Senior member

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    Why do you refer to this as a sneaker boot, Fok? And is this the 110 last?
     


  3. LA Guy

    LA Guy Opposite Santa Staff Member Admin Moderator

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    I refer to it as a sneaker boot to give an idea of the inspiration and the way that I envisioned it being worn. I sort of wanted a boot that was a bit of a moonboot, something like the Visvim Virgil, that could be worn with look denim and "real" streetwear. Vibergs have a workboot base, but depending on the last - yes, this is the 110 last - the choices of sole, leather, model, etc..., you could have something that quite "goth ninja", or something that looks like a good English country boot, or, in this case, something very streetwear.
     


  4. Arizor

    Arizor Senior member

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    Fascinating Fok, can't wait for part 3.
     


  5. LA Guy

    LA Guy Opposite Santa Staff Member Admin Moderator

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    Thanks. I thought so too. I'm learning as much from this as are you guys.
     


  6. Fycus

    Fycus Senior member

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    I appreciate the attention to detail in these series and I also like variety, but this is probably the third time you've mentioned the virgil when getting your viberg boots made. Just wondering, why choose an alternative when you can get the actual boot?
     


  7. basil rathbone

    basil rathbone Senior member

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    Probably because these are better.
     


  8. LA Guy

    LA Guy Opposite Santa Staff Member Admin Moderator

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    The short answer is that I have very specific wants that are better met by MTO, and that I have a brand loyalty to Viberg, and not to Visvim.

    The Virgils on which I based these boots are from FW11, and I am about a 10.5-11 US, or a 29 (at least) in Japanese sizing, so it's nearly impossibly to find those. In additional, I find the Virgils just a bit too high on the ankle. I like my boots to be comfortable for long rides in cars and planes, which happen more often than I'd like. And the only feature that is really unique about the Virgils is the heel counter piece, which I think is really cool, and does sort of put that "sneaker" stamp on it, but it's not worth the tradeoff in durability or leather choice for me.
     


  9. linafelt

    linafelt Senior member

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    This is really cool... Thanks so much for posting. Nice to see the process up close and in detail..
     


  10. brassmonkey

    brassmonkey Member

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    Cool thread. I'd like to see more like this, it's nice getting a behind the scenes look at the work that goes into this stuff.
     


  11. Emixam

    Emixam Senior member

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    colo ! So that's the goodyear process, right ?
     


  12. LA Guy

    LA Guy Opposite Santa Staff Member Admin Moderator

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    From what I understand, it's the stitchdown method.

    Cheers,

    Fok.
     


  13. Emixam

    Emixam Senior member

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    i think they use machine stitch welt goodyear method rather than the handtitch one. How much time difference between the 2 methods ?
     


  14. trig

    trig Senior member

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