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Usage of the term "suiting"

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Matt S, Aug 23, 2016.

  1. Matt S

    Matt S Senior member

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    The term "suiting", of course, refers to the cloth a suit is made from, just as jackets are made from jacking and shirts are made from shirting. This I've known for a long time. But over the past few years, I've seen the term used as a collective noun for suits. It seems as if half of the websites that sell suits have now changed their wording from "suits" to "suiting". Is this actually correct usage of the term? Is this a new thing of this decade, or has "suiting" always been a collective noun for suits? I can only recall seeing this recently. My printed dictionaries from the 1990s and earlier only have the definition that "suiting" is the material a suit is made from. Some online dictionaries only have that definition, though the collective noun can be found in many. I get the impression that people and brands now use the term "suiting" as a collective noun just to sound fancy. People who don't know anything about suits use the term because they think it makes them sound knowledgeable. Since it's now in dictionaries, it's legitimate. But is this usage only a recent development?
     
  2. GusW

    GusW Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Add the misuse of the word "bespoke" to this.
     
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  3. Academic2

    Academic2 Senior member

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    It's become a marketing term, with businesses hoping it projects an air of sophistication.

    When money and language conflict, money usually wins.

    Cheers,

    Ac
     
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  4. Matt S

    Matt S Senior member

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    It's not just businesses that use it but also magazines and newspapers in their articles about suits. Whenever I read a New York Times article about men's style these days they always mention "suiting".
     
  5. Academic2

    Academic2 Senior member

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    And I'm sure we all know that in many quarters today when referring to shoes the word 'oxford' denotes just about any shoe with lacing that isn't an athletic shoe.

    Semantic drift.

    Cheers,

    Ac
     
  6. Matt S

    Matt S Senior member

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    But this isn't so recent. Americans have used the term "oxford" for a lace-up shoe at least since the 1960s. Americans have the term "balmoral" for what the British call an Oxford. This to me is more of a regional difference than a semantic drift. How far back does the current usage of "suiting" go?
     
    Last edited: Aug 23, 2016
  7. BigBadBernard

    BigBadBernard Senior member

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    'Suiting' is, of course the cloth.

    'Jacking' is a verb. As in, ...off
     
  8. Count de Monet

    Count de Monet Senior member

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    I doubt it predates the internet. As you mentioned, it is simply folks trying to sound fancy.

    Also, I believe what AC meant was using "oxford" to describe any shoe dressier than Chuck Taylors having laces. In other words, blurring the "open lacing/closed lacing" distinction. I have even noticed that on Alden & AE's websites, i.e. referring to a derby or blucher as an oxford. Folks you'd think would know better.
     
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  9. unbelragazzo

    unbelragazzo Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I've been jacking for years and still haven't made one jacket out of it.
     
    Last edited: Aug 23, 2016
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  10. Academic2

    Academic2 Senior member

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  11. GBR

    GBR Senior member

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    Suiting and coating bother to the cloth.

    Jacking is jacking off and has nothing to do with cloth whatever.

    To the class of shop to which you refer, knowledge is not required, quality is a burden of the trade that is best ignored and in fact all that is wanted is a steady stream of saps crossing the threshold to be parted from the money for the tat on offer within.
     
  12. dieworkwear

    dieworkwear Senior member

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    You're a legend.
     
    Last edited: Aug 23, 2016
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  13. LA Guy

    LA Guy Opposite Santa Staff Member Admin Moderator

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    "Pricepoint" to mean "price range" or simply "price" is much more annoying to me.
     
  14. Sam H

    Sam H Senior member

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    I'd like to interest you in some vintage heritage curated selvedge suiting complete with YKK zipper fly and Goodyear welted full canvas. Made the same way are grandfathers did by firelight
     
  15. 12345Michael54321

    12345Michael54321 Senior member

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    It's an evolution in the common use of the word "suiting." The English language does evolve, in the meanings and connotations of words, in idiom, in grammar, etc.

    For example, not many years ago, "Recommend me a tailor," would have immediately struck people as something which might have been asked by someone not fully fluent in the English language. (The proper form of the request being more along the lines of, "Recommend a tailor," or "Give me a recommendation to a tailor," or something similar.)

    But the "Recommend me a...," construction has taken the Internet by storm, to the extent that it's become somewhat common usage.

    For that matter, there was a time prior to the rise of online menswear forums when American men felt free to refer to "suspenders" and "pants." Today, of course, most well dressed American men feel compelled to adopt British usage - braces and trousers.
     
  16. ChetB

    ChetB Senior member

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    **fashion e-commerce site menu of 2026**

    suiting
    jacketing
    shirting
    panting
    knitting
    shoeing
     
  17. gs77

    gs77 Senior member

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    It might be an evolution of English language, but I'm not sure it is in a good direction. I think it is driven not by native English speakers and their needs to describe changing environment, but by the whole world, for most of whom English is a second language, and used only for basic communication - not used to express any deep thought and without any aesthetic intent.
    I know, I am one of them. Before moving to NA, I used to sit on meetings or conf calls with 10+ people speaking English, getting things done and none of us were native English speakers. All sorts of nasty language constructs were used, but who cares. I can imagine something like "suiting" being baked in similar type of kitchen.
     
  18. dieworkwear

    dieworkwear Senior member

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    You misspelled pantsing.
     
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  19. SartodiNapoli

    SartodiNapoli Senior member

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    Normal, I have never read a proper or correct article about classic dressing on any so called dressing blog, then how to expect on any newspaper or magazine?
     
  20. 12345Michael54321

    12345Michael54321 Senior member

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    It's uncommon for an expert in any field - economics, cosmology, firearms, film making, etc. - to regard any article about his field, which is published in the popular press, to be particularly accurate.

    I don't see why classic dressing would be any exception.
     

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