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US measurement system,i don't get it.

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by IsteRed, Jul 1, 2011.

  1. Naka

    Naka Senior member

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    where i live its either pints or mids

    you must come from one of those whacky states which has schooners?


    Schooners and pints in QLD, if you're going to have a beer there's no point buying a schooner.
     
  2. ratboycom

    ratboycom Senior member

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    IIRC Japanese builders are dropping metric for "traditional" measurements for the same reasons.


    I can imagine tsubo and jou measurements, but bring up square meters and I am totally lost. My loft is 11 jou (5.5 tsubo) of livable space and 6 jou (3 tsubo) of kitchen, shower, laundry, and toilet. If I heard square meters/feet I would be very [​IMG]
     
  3. FLMountainMan

    FLMountainMan Senior member

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    Schooners and pints in QLD, if you're going to have a beer there's no point buying a schooner.

    Wow. English is really diverging, huh? I have no idea what this sentence means, other than it's something about the size of peer servings in Queensland (?).
     
  4. IsteRed

    IsteRed Senior member

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    Wow. English is really diverging, huh? I have no idea what this sentence means, other than it's something about the size of peer servings in Queensland (?).

    I'm so happy i'm not the only one that didn't understand what this means...
     
  5. Fang66

    Fang66 Senior member

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    Schooners and pints in QLD, if you're going to have a beer there's no point buying a schooner.

    Shit, how have you not been killed as a blue spy? Schooners? Ya fuckn cockroach, scuttle back south of the border.

    Just kidding of course, you must be a youngster because back in the day Qld pubs only carried 7 and 10 ounce glasses, a Beer and a Pot respectively. The theory was that it is too hot in Qld to drink out of big glasses as the beer goes warm. A few pubs carried NSW sized Schooners but no one ordered them except Mexican tourists. I don't think I saw a Pint glass until the mid to late 80s and then you would only order pints of Guinness.
     
  6. yachtie

    yachtie Senior member

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    Wow. English is really diverging, huh? I have no idea what this sentence means, other than it's something about the size of peer servings in Queensland (?).
    Nah. A schooner of beer is still understandable in Wisconsin.
     
  7. yachtie

    yachtie Senior member

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    But I do live here. And in your earlier post you spoke off base twelve and sixteen, thus conceivably some high denominators. Anyway, I now deduce that American builders are only 2/3th as accurate as 'metric' ones. 2/Anyway, depending on the figure behind the comma the denominator is always the same for all the fractions: 10, 100, 1000.
    Conceivably, but never in practice. and no, American builders are .6666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666 as accurate as "metric" ones. and That's why I can't stand metric.
     
  8. vaalbara

    vaalbara Senior member

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    is that really necessary?
     
  9. CDFS

    CDFS Senior member

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    Conceivably, but never in practice. and no, American builders are .6666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666
    as accurate as "metric" ones.

    and That's why I can't stand metric.


    [​IMG] [​IMG]
    By the way, here you can use fractions too...
     
  10. FLMountainMan

    FLMountainMan Senior member

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    Nah. A schooner of beer is still understandable in Wisconsin.

    Fine. WTF does it mean?
     
  11. yachtie

    yachtie Senior member

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    Fine. WTF does it mean?
    It's a large glass (1 1/2 pints IIRC).
     
  12. Mr Herbert

    Mr Herbert Senior member

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    in Australia a schooner is a US pint (425mL?) and only served in the Eastern States because the blokes over there are a little soft.

    pints are always imperial pints (570mLs)

    you can also get a Pony - 140mL (only drunk by returned servicemen) and half pints are called middys, handles or pots depending on what state you live in.
     
  13. lenahan

    lenahan Senior member

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    The US measurement system, or US Customary Measurement system, is a relative of and is very similar to the British Imperial Measurement System. It, much like the Imperial units are in Britain, are entrenched in their respective areas. Even to this day, long after adopting the metric system, measurements in the UK are often listed in both systems, as many people are accustomed to and refuse to or are unable to change to the new system. The same applies to the US Customary Units, although they are still the official "weights and measures" system of the United States, set by Congress. As per the Constitution, the official system of weights and measures is set by Congress. It could be changed by majority vote of both houses, but given the fact that all measurement systems are fundamentally arbitrary, and the fact that Congress has far more important things to worry about, and the fact that there is little support to change them, it is unlikely to happen. Scientists and the military, as well as certain government offices use them, and it is standard practice for measurements on US made products, and those made for the US market, to use both.
     
  14. Fang66

    Fang66 Senior member

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    in Australia a schooner is a US pint (425mL?) and only served in the Eastern States because the blokes over there are a little soft.

    pints are always imperial pints (570mLs)

    you can also get a Pony - 140mL (only drunk by returned servicemen) and half pints are called middys, handles or pots depending on what state you live in.


    Almost correct, beer glass sizes in Australia and N.Z. are generally smaller than other countries, I believe this is related to (as I said above) the belief that the beer will go warm in the hot climate but it is also related to the 'Six O'Clock Swill'.

    Until the late sixties or early 70s most pubs (hotel public bars) would close at six O'Clock, this was brought about by pressure from the temperance league. Men would finish work at 5 then rush to the pub and down as many beers as possible in the next hour. Smaller glasses were more efficiently poured and emptied. A 7 ounce glass is easily downed in one gulp a 10 in 2 gulps and the bartender could quickly serve many customers. The bartender would fill the glasses using a gun on a hose rather than taking the glass to the tap.

    Pubs may carry glasses ranging from 4 Imp fl oz/115 ml to 20 Imp fl oz/570 ml increasing in increments of 1oz between 4oz and 10oz then 12oz 15 oz and 20oz. Most pubs only carry a few of these sizes and depending on the state different sizes are more popular. Until the 1990s generally the most common sizes were 7, 10, and 15 fl oz known as a beer/7, pot and schooner where I'm from but with other names in other states/cities. For example in N.S.W. a 10 oz beer is called a middie and in S.A. it is a schooner. (sometimes 9 oz) and in S.A. a 7 oz is called a butcher.

    More recently it is difficult to find a glass under 10 oz except in traditional working mens bars or places frequented by returned servicemen (noted above by Mr Herbert) and 20 oz or pints are becoming popular as younger people are enamoured by British beers and can ponce on about their trip to Europe.

    An interesting side note about the Six O'Clock Swill was that until about the same time as it ended women were barred from public bars, I remember as a child that I could go into the bar with my father but my mother couldn't. Female barmaids were alowed however and my uncle owned a pub that employed naked barmaids, this was deemed illegal so the barmaids changed to wearing completely sheer and see-through nighties [​IMG]
     
  15. Texasmade

    Texasmade Senior member

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    Almost correct, beer glass sizes in Australia and N.Z. are generally smaller than other countries, I believe this is related to (as I said above) the belief that the beer will go warm in the hot climate but it is also related to the 'Six O'Clock Swill'.

    Until the late sixties or early 70s most pubs (hotel public bars) would close at six O'Clock, this was brought about by pressure from the temperance league. Men would finish work at 5 then rush to the pub and down as many beers as possible in the next hour. Smaller glasses were more efficiently poured and emptied. A 7 ounce glass is easily downed in one gulp a 10 in 2 gulps and the bartender could quickly serve many customers. The bartender would fill the glasses using a gun on a hose rather than taking the glass to the tap.

    Pubs may carry glasses ranging from 4 Imp fl oz/115 ml to 20 Imp fl oz/570 ml increasing in increments of 1oz between 4oz and 10oz then 12oz 15 oz and 20oz. Most pubs only carry a few of these sizes and depending on the state different sizes are more popular. Until the 1990s generally the most common sizes were 7, 10, and 15 fl oz known as a beer/7, pot and schooner where I'm from but with other names in other states/cities. For example in N.S.W. a 10 oz beer is called a middie and in S.A. it is a schooner. (sometimes 9 oz) and in S.A. a 7 oz is called a butcher.

    More recently it is difficult to find a glass under 10 oz except in traditional working mens bars or places frequented by returned servicemen (noted above by Mr Herbert) and 20 oz or pints are becoming popular as younger people are enamoured by British beers and can ponce on about their trip to Europe.

    An interesting side note about the Six O'Clock Swill was that until about the same time as it ended women were barred from public bars, I remember as a child that I could go into the bar with my father but my mother couldn't. Female barmaids were alowed however and my uncle owned a pub that employed naked barmaids, this was deemed illegal so the barmaids changed to wearing completely sheer and see-through nighties [​IMG]


    Awesome.
     
  16. Logan

    Logan Senior member

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    Old people, stubborn, etc. They tried to in the 70s IIRC. People hated it.

    "My car gets 40 rods to the hog's head, and that's the way I likes it!"


    I saw that Simpsons episode 2 days ago and it made me think of your post.
     
  17. yachtie

    yachtie Senior member

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    "My car gets 40 rods to the hog's head, and that's the way I likes it!"
    Geez, and I thought my Suburban got shitty mileage.......
     
  18. Cool The Kid

    Cool The Kid Senior member

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    The only thing that would be better than switching to the metric system would be if we could switch to a base 8 or base 12 numbering system and then use the equivalent of the metric system. Base 10 sucks.
    [​IMG]
     
  19. howbah

    howbah Senior member

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    you can also get a Pony - 140mL (only drunk by returned servicemen)


    what's the connection there?
     
  20. pvrhye

    pvrhye Senior member

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    Metric is better for precise math, but the Imperial system is way better to eyeball. It works on halves with is pretty convenient when you don't give a damn within 1/16" or so.
     

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