Unfunded Liabilities: a/k/a The Cloth Thread

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Manton, Feb 10, 2008.

  1. Slickman

    Slickman Senior member

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    If you want a navy hopsack go with the one in the lesser 16oz book if it is still in stock, or something from the smiths steadfast book.
     


  2. smc

    smc Member

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    Yes, as soon as I read your post my thought was "I've definitely read things in this thread pointing people to the Lesser 16oz". I'd forgotten about it, but you triggered my memory.

    Took a look on the Harrisons website, and from the photo (for what that's worth), I think I do really like it.

    Fun part now will be getting my hands on it. Fairly sure my tailor doesn't have it, and previously I've always just picked from the books. Never done the whole "Buy my own cloth" thing.
     


  3. Despos

    Despos Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Are you making a jacket or a suit? For jacketing, the last sample in the Bingley formal wear book has a 12 ounce hopsack that is very dense. Haven't seen anything like it in any other books. It's soft but tough. Kind of unique to other cloths around today. Making two of them up at present.
     


  4. Svenn

    Svenn Senior member

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    I recently had a suit made up in a Lesser 16oz hopsack, partly from recommendations from Chris; if you want to see it you can PM me.

    Chris, unrelated question, but I asked my tailor to see the canvas he's been using on my suits and it was all a pretty limp hymo with little spring, which I think explains the limpness in my fronts. I recently ordered some haircloth (horsehair tail I assume since it was narrow width and expensive) from Dugdale that is much springier and makes a big arc when folded over. Could haircloth be used for ALL the canvassing to get an extra robust, clean look like in Jeffery D's coats? My tailor said he'd be happy to use it in place of his hymo. Or is it just meant for the chest?
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2014


  5. Despos

    Despos Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Can't imagine using horsehair as canvass. If you want to experiment there are multiple weights and firmness of hymo. Ask your tailor if he has a sample book of them. You can also use linen but it is more supple than crisp. I think you are wanting the canvass to be more crisp. Something that creates more vivid shape? Might be the way he cuts and prepares the canvass is the problem.

    Am I the Chris you are referring to?
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2014


  6. Svenn

    Svenn Senior member

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    Yes you're the one :) Well, he's not the kind of tailor that has a book of canvasses, he uses the same hymo for all of his suits... he is bespoke but it's lower end (but convenient to my location). I was just hoping the haircloth might 'help' the structure of the coat since I know he's not really interested in shaping they hymo more crisply and vividly as you say. What would be the problem with using haircloth everywhere? Would it spring open wildly here and there? So maybe I should just give him one of Dudgdale's crisper, heavier, firmer hymos rather than haircloth?
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2014


  7. Despos

    Despos Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    16 ounce hopsack isn't going to look crisp when you make it up.
     


  8. Svenn

    Svenn Senior member

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    Oh this is for other fabrics, like right now I'm thinking of giving him another 8oz Cape Breeze, and wanted to make sure it was as crisp as possible at the end.
     


  9. DocHolliday

    DocHolliday Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    What's a better option? If someone wanted a crisp blazer, for example?
     


  10. Slickman

    Slickman Senior member

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    The lesser 16 is a very "dry" old world cloth, its something many people venturing into bespoke gloss over, but eventually come to after they've made a few errors in choosing cloth, you would be lucky to start with it, the navy hopsack will make up a great sport jacket
     


  11. Despos

    Despos Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Seems like a foreign question to hear on stylforum. I thought "soft tailoring" was de rigueur here. You're not from around these parts, heh Doc?
     


  12. sugarbutch

    sugarbutch Bearded Prick Dubiously Honored

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    inorite? Next thing you know, he'll be advocating white OCBD shirts with odd jackets...
     


  13. Despos

    Despos Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    It's a slippery slope, indeed!
     


  14. mktitsworth

    mktitsworth Senior member

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    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2014


  15. archetypal_yuppie

    archetypal_yuppie Senior member

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    What are you trying to convey by using "dry"?
     


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