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Unfunded Liabilities: a/k/a The Cloth Thread

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Manton, Feb 10, 2008.

  1. badsha

    badsha Senior member

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    Trini I believe this particular one is over coating. I can check the weight later today.
     
  2. bourbonbasted

    bourbonbasted Senior member

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    Not sure if this is the historical precedent, but I do know that during post-war cloth shortages, tailored garments were often "turned-out." A "turn-out" was when a tailor, to save on cloth, would literally take apart the sleeves, collar, pockets, front, everything he could. Then he would lay the cloth flat and turn it over, re-making the suit on the "wrong side" of the cloth.

    No chance a tailor would do that today, but I have to assume measures like that had to impact the manufacturing of fabrics. And it's likely, while the circumstances have changed, the producer's methods have not. Good way to get two suits in one, so to speak.

    (source)
     
    Last edited: Sep 27, 2013
    1 person likes this.
  3. Manton

    Manton Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    part of it was that I didn't care about ordinary wear. But it got to a point where it was beyond "patina" and starting to look "homeless"
     
    2 people like this.
  4. sugarbutch

    sugarbutch Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Interesting. So, at this point it's basically just a neat thing (nothing wrong with that, of course)?
     
  5. mactire

    mactire Senior member

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    I don't know if this is the origin of this either, but my grandfather would have his old police uniform turned when he was getting a new one. You would always know as the breast pocket would then be on the opposite side. It might be looked down on as well by others, an old neighbour of mine remembers the practice and talked of someone he knew being a bit cheap because they always had their suits turned.

    Its probably more to do with the cost of manufactured goods relative to labour and wages. Nowadays cloth takes up at the most 20% of the price of a suit, its possible that this would have been the reverse in the past. For those of you who've read The Ginger Man by JP Dunleavy there's a passage at the end where the main character is revelling in the luxury of a new Donegal tweed suit and says it cost 5 guineas a yard. The 3 yards for a suit would have cost three weeks pay, which gives some context for the price of cloth relative to the making up.
     
    Last edited: Sep 27, 2013
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  6. Concordia

    Concordia Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    There was a time when "turning" was a fairly common skill. Even in his prime (1920s and 1930s), Babe Ruth took pride in turning the collars on his Sulka shirts. Obviously, he'd learned this in the Baltimore orphanage when he was a kid.
     
  7. XFactor

    XFactor Senior member

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    Quoted Spoiler Two:








    SPOILER 2:






     
    Last edited: Oct 5, 2013
  8. aravenel

    aravenel Senior member

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    Please don't do that.
     
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  9. Eustace Tilley

    Eustace Tilley Senior member

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    +10
     
  10. velomane

    velomane Senior member

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    What are you guys referring to? The long series of quotes?
     
  11. Grammaton Cleric

    Grammaton Cleric Senior member

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    Yes, annoying. He should at least put in a spoiler.
     
  12. sprout2

    sprout2 Senior member

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    Do not be discouraged. Make a wiki.
     
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  13. Apollotrader

    Apollotrader Senior member

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    Greetings Gents-

    I am looking for a Prince of Wales with a purple under-stripe for a sport coat. Any guidance would be much appreciated. Ideally a light cashmere or cashmere blend however I would consider all options. Thanks in advance.

    RCC

    Edit:

    I suppose a Glen Plaid would work as well.
     
    Last edited: Sep 28, 2013
  14. MrPhineasCole

    MrPhineasCole Member

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    Does anyone know who produces/sources the kind of polyester material often used to make trench/rain coats? My tailor said he has never seen anything similar from the places who supply him suiting cloth. Is it a completely different industry? I would imagine pricing to be less expensive than natural fibers, but I am completely uneducated on the topic. I'm considering getting a black or a grey waterproof coat made for myself. Any wisdom or help is greatly appreciated.
     
  15. mactire

    mactire Senior member

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    I never got any 'technical' fabric myself, but I have bought Ventile to have a Mac made up, it's 100% cotton but waterproof: http://www.ventile.co.uk/
     
    Last edited: Sep 28, 2013
  16. sprout2

    sprout2 Senior member

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    Me, too, but still searching for someone with double needle machines.
     
  17. MrPhineasCole

    MrPhineasCole Member

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    Thanks for the input thus far, gentlemen. That's a good point; I had better confirm that my tailor can work with the cloth before I make a purchase.
     
  18. sprout2

    sprout2 Senior member

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    The ventile specification calls for a double felled seam for waterproofing the edges. Not challenging, but time-consuming and requiring the right equipment. Someone used to working on jeans would be better equipped than a handsewing tailor.
     
  19. dieworkwear

    dieworkwear Senior member

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    Have you handled Ventile before? Just my two cents, but I think a heavier, traditional gabardine - like the kind Burberry uses - or a rubberized fabric would look better than Ventile. Ventile is a bit too technical, I think, for your purposes (or what I imagine your purposes to be).
     
  20. sprout2

    sprout2 Senior member

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    Ventile comes in numerous weights
     

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