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Unfunded Liabilities: a/k/a The Cloth Thread

smittycl

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I don't think Giaccone is a style per se (at least not that I know of, but I could be wrong). Giaccone just means "big jacket/coat" in Italian
I looked it up and the term is used fairly liberally. Surprised I never noticed it.


 

aristoi bcn

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I’m not familiar with “giaccone” coat and was having trouble finding a definition of the term. Any help?
Peacoat. Or coat to be worn over knitwear instead of a suit or sportcoat.

Then you have soprabito which translates roughly into topcoat and capotto which is overcoat.

As it is said in italian: tradutore, traditore. Thus, took any of the above translations with a pinch of salt.
 

dieworkwear

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I also have a couple of „casual suits,“ for example one in corduroy. I‘m wondering, though, if you guys wear your casual suits sans cravatte. I‘ve done gone with and w/o tie, but it seems a tie contradicts the casual vibe. Thoughts?
I think you can wear a tie with a casual suit. But I mostly go without
 

hpreston

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Is your seersucker 100% cotton?

I‘m a bit surprised to hear you have one, since it seems to be something one cannot wear often and you frequently post about having a wardrobe which is versatile. Anyways, I‘d like to get one myself someday, but probably only after I have several fresco and linen suits.
Are you asking me? My suit is made from a Loro Piana wool-silk fabric.

I think at some point, a wardrobe gets big enough where it's OK to have some things you'll only wear once in a blue moon. I think versatility is a bigger deal if you have a small wardrobe.
I had a suit made up in Loro Piana's "Lightest" a wool/silk Seersucker. Similar to this Armoury suit but I got Navy (theirs is lighter blue)


View attachment 1536530
I have a navy seersucker suit in the VBC version of this cloth. I ordered it before the dark times and it just came in this past fall, so not much chance to wear it yet.

it is the navy version of this:

That Loro Piana cloth looks great! But do you guys get much wear out of your suits? How often do you wear them and on what occasion?
I also have a couple of „casual suits,“ for example one in corduroy. I‘m wondering, though, if you guys wear your casual suits sans cravatte. I‘ve done gone with and w/o tie, but it seems a tie contradicts the casual vibe. Thoughts?
I think you can wear a tie with a casual suit. But I mostly go without
As stated above, I can’t speak much to the seersucker specifically, but I have a brown cord suit, that I have worn “casually”. If I do wear a tie with it (for casual wear) it is a knit tie. I also love a turtleneck with it, or a chambray button down shirt.

I am back in the office now, so I anticipate the seersucker getting some use this spring/summer. I look forward to playing around with dressing it up, like smitty’s post, and dressing it down as well.
 

kolecho

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I’m not familiar with “giaccone” coat and was having trouble finding a definition of the term. Any help?
I believe Gennaro calls this a giaccone due to its mid thigh length. FYI this giaccone also have a plain back with centre vent which seems to be a rarity these days 😎
 

dan'l

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RE: casual suits, I agree with the knit tie and like that combo. As far as cords + turtle-neck goes, also a good look, but I cannot seem to find a nice T-neck in cashmere. Call me spoiled, but as I get older, I just feel that getting knits in anything but cashmere seems a waste. Most of the available cashmere knitwear is single- or double-ply, meaning they last one or at best two seasons. I suppose this is not the thread to be talking about knitwear, though...

RE: seersucker, I travel to see my tailor and whenever I come home with new pieces, I need to do some light pressing. Does seersucker need any special care, or can you press it like other wool fabric? My only experience with seersucker till now was cotton shirts.
 

dieworkwear

Mahatma Jawndi
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RE: casual suits, I agree with the knit tie and like that combo. As far as cords + turtle-neck goes, also a good look, but I cannot seem to find a nice T-neck in cashmere. Call me spoiled, but as I get older, I just feel that getting knits in anything but cashmere seems a waste. Most of the available cashmere knitwear is single- or double-ply, meaning they last one or at best two seasons. I suppose this is not the thread to be talking about knitwear, though...

RE: seersucker, I travel to see my tailor and whenever I come home with new pieces, I need to do some light pressing. Does seersucker need any special care, or can you press it like other wool fabric? My only experience with seersucker till now was cotton shirts.
Whenever my tailoring needs any care, I just send it out to a professional. I can't say for sure if seersucker requires something different. Like Smitty, mine is also a blue tonal wool-silk fabric from Loro Piana, not the traditional blue-and-white striped cotton. I do have a cotton suit, but it's not seersucker.

I have a corduroy suit and admit I don't wear it that much as a full suit. I still like it and I've been considering getting another. But the garment gets more wear as separates. I think I'm somewhat self-conscious of coming across as a fusty academic, but that may be my own hang-up.

I do like and wear linen suits. I find wool gabardine to be really nice in casual colors such as tan, but it's hard to find wool gab these days (if you get it, go for a heavier fabric, not the super lightweight 9oz stuff). I find that when a casual suit can't be easily broken into separates, it almost makes it easier to wear for some reason. It becomes a thing where I think "ok, I'm going to wear a suit today." Whereas if I can break the suit up into separates, I always just wear the jacket as a sport coat.

Mohair-wool is also nice for the evenings. It has a very subtle sheen that looks nice under dim lights, like you'd have in restaurants and bars. I recently commissioned a cotton-stretch blend suit, but haven't had a chance to wear it. I've also thought about getting a grey thornproof suit.

FWIW, I still find I wear my sport coats much, much more than my casual suits. But I think suits look better than sport coats, and I don't have many occasions to wear formal suits. So I like wearing causal ones when I can.
 

dan'l

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Hey Derek, thank you for the thoughtful reply. I generally agree with your points. On the days I go to the office, I wear my sports coats + odd trousers. Actually I don‘t have many occasions to wear a suit + tie to work, so I tend to go the sport coats route. I agree that suits look better, but since I have an aversion to the suit-without-tie look, I nearly always default to a SC.

You bring up a good point about suits that are wearable as separates. I have a fresco Blazersuit and even though my wardrobe is deep enough not to wear it as a SC, I tend to do that anyways!

Regarding mohair-wool, I picked up a length of the navy blue silk herringbone (same same as The Chai) and looking forward to getting it made up for nights on the town (if they ever return).
 

Bespoke DJP

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Re: Giaccone

Practically a coat positioned between a jacket and a topcoat / overcoat.

Konstanti (@konstantis) we used to call it "redicotta" (originating from the English word: riding coat), its length being in the middle-length of the above-stated garments (at approx. the mid-thigh).

Another term is "caban", IMO it calls for a lightweight overcoating (or a heavyweight jacketing) fabric to satisfy its destination; very heavy fabrics will probably contradict its purpose, although taste will have a primary role in fabric selection.

Best,

Dimitris
 

konstantis

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Re: Giaccone

Practically a coat positioned between a jacket and a topcoat / overcoat.

Konstanti (@konstantis) we used to call it "redicotta" (originating from the English word: riding coat), its length being in the middle-length of the above-stated garments (at approx. the mid-thigh).

Another term is "caban", IMO it calls for a lightweight overcoating (or a heavyweight jacketing) fabric to satisfy its destination; very heavy fabrics will probably contradict its purpose, although taste will have a primary role in fabric selection.

Best,

Dimitris
You are so right Dimitris.
 

ChasingStyle

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Re: Giaccone

Practically a coat positioned between a jacket and a topcoat / overcoat.

Konstanti (@konstantis) we used to call it "redicotta" (originating from the English word: riding coat), its length being in the middle-length of the above-stated garments (at approx. the mid-thigh).

Another term is "caban", IMO it calls for a lightweight overcoating (or a heavyweight jacketing) fabric to satisfy its destination; very heavy fabrics will probably contradict its purpose, although taste will have a primary role in fabric selection.

Best,

Dimitris
like this?

 

Wren

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Anyone knows where can I find a nice light yellow oxford shirting? Couldn't find any from my tailor's books, and acorn is out of theirs.
 

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