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Tuxedo Shoes

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by JLibourel, Mar 20, 2005.

  1. summej2

    summej2 Senior member

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    another bump.

    what are thoughts on black, plain, velvet slippers? these would be for my wedding

    [​IMG]


    To your own wedding? I wouldn't.
     
  2. makewayhomer

    makewayhomer Senior member

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    The rule about wearing patent leather with black tie is one of the rules I break.

    I agree that patent leather is the traditional choice.

    However, for some reason, I just can't bring myself to wear patent leather shoes. To my eye, they look cheap (even the nice ones.)

    With my black tie clothing, I wear plain-toe Bal Oxfords in black shell cordovan, shined to a very high sheen.


    I like this idea, actually. I know shell is often considered a rustic leather, but in black, couldn't it be shined to come close to patent, without it being so...patenty?
     
  3. pvrhye

    pvrhye Senior member

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    Traditionally, evening pumps were calf or patent, lace-up shoes (always plain-toe oxfords; a blucher is seriously not right for a formal shoe) were patent. You can indeed wear the pump with white tie. Some authorities consider it to be required, or at least prefered, because it is a vestige of court dress, and therefore the most formal shoe in a man's arsenel.

    In no contemporary (1930s) source that I have or have seen have I found a mention of plain leather lace-up formal shoes. I know some people hate patent; I'm not saying my word is dispositive (see below), just reporting what I have found.


    How traditional is patent leather? Isn't it a fairly modern material?
     
  4. Bird's One View

    Bird's One View Senior member

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    How traditional is patent leather? Isn't it a fairly modern material?

    late 19th century. 1860s maybe? originally coated with linseed oil, now coated with plastic.
     
  5. pvrhye

    pvrhye Senior member

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    late 19th century. 1860s maybe? originally coated with linseed oil, now coated with plastic.

    I didn't know about the linseed before, but I kinda figured it showed up in the very early 20th century and was kinda a novelty then. That level of bling seems to outshine the lapels, which as far as I've always assumed would be the highlight of the outfit.
     
  6. cbird

    cbird Senior member

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    On the John Lobb (St. James's) website, in the black and white catalogue from the 1930's, there is a picture of a "Tuxedo Slipper" which is a Norwegian slip-on. I once saw someone in London wearing shoes like these with a Tuxedo and thought it looked good, but have never come across mention of this option anywhere else. Any opinions?
     

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