Tuxedo question

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Yosarian77, Feb 17, 2004.

  1. Yosarian77

    Yosarian77 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    60
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2003
    It's finally time to send my 15 year old cheap tux to the scrap heap and I am now venturing out to update my tux. I'm not really sure what I want, but wanted to know what you guys thought about the different tux styles.

    I want single breasted for sure, but what other features do you guys like? Specifically, 3,2, or 1 button? What about the lapel? Help.
     
  2. NavyStyles

    NavyStyles Senior member

    Messages:
    521
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2002
    Location:
    New Orleans, LA
    I have a single-breasted one-button tuxedo. I would suggest sticking with just one button; definitely no more than two buttons. I think a peak lapel looks really sharp. The suggestions I'm giving you follow the more traditional school of thought. I think it's best to stick to them for things like a tux, since it's a pretty big buy.
     
  3. matadorpoeta

    matadorpoeta Senior member

    Messages:
    4,458
    Likes Received:
    1
    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2003
    i think la guy mentioned he preferred the one-button peak lapel tuxedo, and i agree. i'm curious as to why this is popular with tuxedos but less so with suits...

    p.s. go with side vents or no vents at all. the center vent is useless and shows your butt.
     
  4. A Harris

    A Harris Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    4,582
    Likes Received:
    11
    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2003
    As the guys said - it should be a single breasted one-button with a peak lapel. That is the best tux you can own.
     
  5. Yosarian77

    Yosarian77 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    60
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2003
    Gentlemen,
    And so it shall be--single breasted, peak lapel, one button.
    Thank you for the help.
     
  6. NavyStyles

    NavyStyles Senior member

    Messages:
    521
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2002
    Location:
    New Orleans, LA
    I say go with side vents. Personally, I prefer having any vent to none at all.
     
  7. Brian SD

    Brian SD Moderator

    Messages:
    9,760
    Likes Received:
    122
    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2004
    Location:
    Tokyo
    Speaking of vents, do you guys know if a half-decent tailor can add vents in to a ventless suit jacket (or tux, for that matter)?
     
  8. bengal-stripe

    bengal-stripe Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    4,447
    Likes Received:
    864
    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2002
    Location:
    London, UK
    Vents need an extension, to overlap properly and cannot be added at a later date. You must have decided, whether or not you want a vent/vents before you start cutting the cloth.

    Vents can always be taken out (closed) at some later point.
     
  9. AskAndyAboutClothes

    AskAndyAboutClothes Senior member

    Messages:
    175
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2003
    Location:
    Manhattan Beach & Palm Desert, CA
    Brian SD:

    You can close vents but not add them.

    Yosarian77:

    I agree with most of the suggestions. A traditional dinner jacket (Tuxedo) should have Peak lapels in satin, silk or grosgrain, single breasted, one (2 or 3 is OK) button (buttons in same fabric as lapels), piped or double besom pockets (avoid flap pockets), no or minimal side vents.

    Peaked or shawl lapels are both appropriate, the notched is not. The peaked lapel, single-breasted dinner jacket is the most correct since it's derived directly from the original tailcoat, and the shawl has origins from the smoking jacket. The notched lapel has its origins in the common business suit and thus is never, or less acceptable for formal dress.

    Notched lapels appearing on formalwear is an effort by modern manufacturers to profit by using standard daytime jacket forms and simply facing the lapels in satin.

    The shawl lapel is a traditional look and is most popular on the summer white dinner jacket. You may want to avoid the shawl if you are on the heavy side since it accentuates roundness.

    The fabric on the lapel should match the fabric of the button covers, cummerbund, and the trouser stripe.

    Trousers should be pleated, held up by braces only, with a satin seam up the outside leg (derived from military formal dress from the officers leg braid). One leg seam for black tie and two for white tie and tails. The braid should match the fabric on the lapels.

    And NEVER cuffed. English tennis players and country folk would turn up their trouser legs at the bottom to avoid mud walking around their country estates. English gentlemen and Royalty followed and the fashion caught on around 1880 for city suits and tweed shooting outfits. Since there is never a chance at getting near mud or other soil at a formal function the straight leg has always been the custom for formal trousers.

    Andy
     
  10. A Harris

    A Harris Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    4,582
    Likes Received:
    11
    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2003
    Also, go with grosgrain lapels if you can. I think they look better.
     

Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by