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To sole gaurd or not ?

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by dreamtripper, Mar 29, 2011.

  1. blahman

    blahman Senior member

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    Figures. Seems those in the medical professions have some macabre sense of humour.
     
  2. SirGrotius

    SirGrotius Senior member

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    I'd err against it. If the weather is that bad I'd almost prefer an old switcheroo.
     
  3. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    I personally like the way a new sole feels on a shoe. After a while the goodyear welted shoe gets a bit gushy and when the new leather is on and new cork filled back in it gives it more support once again. The fit shouldn't change with a simple resole job because the welt and insole isn't replaced, thus the show isn't being relasted or changing its shape. I think you would be more likely to have fit issues sending back for a whole recraft than you would just getting a resole.
    With all due respect... I suspect that if you do not understand the mechanics or accept the logic, this will fall on deaf ears, but... A Goodyear welted shoe cannot be always resoled to the guaranteed exact size it was when it came in for resoling. Whether the customer notices it or not, there is always a little, and sometimes a lot, of slippage in the gemming. The glue lets go, for whatever reasons, and without the original last there is no way to determine 100% accurately where it (the gemming started out. Most shoe repairmen will guess...and it is an educated guess, but still a guess for all of that. Like it or not, there is nearly always a set of mechanical principles that cannot be abrogated in these kinds of things. It never relies on wishful thinking or hearsay or what we think is fair or right. Or even, beyond random, luck.
     
  4. Kuro

    Kuro Senior member

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    ...


    A Goodyear welted shoe cannot be always resoled to the guaranteed exact size it was when it came in for resoling. Whether the customer notices it or not, there is always a little, and sometimes a lot, of slippage in the gemming. The glue lets go, for whatever reasons, and without the original last there is no way to determine 100% accurately where it (the gemming started out. Most shoe repairmen will guess...and it is an educated guess, but still a guess for all of that.

    ...
    .


    what if the shoe is returned to the factory for a recraft and resoled on teh original last?
     
  5. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    what if the shoe is returned to the factory for a recraft and resoled on teh original last?
    In that case, as long as the manufacturer has the original last (sometimes they will replace them with something similar but not exact...just because they wear out over time), your fit should be exactly the same as it was when you first bought/wore them. For goodyear welted shoes, I personally, think re-crafting is the only sure and reliable option. I hate to say that because there are a lot of good and skilled craftsmen out there that repair shoes and do their very best. They bring a lot to the game, not the least of which is local and personal service. But then, the shoe repair Trade began with, and is fundamentally based on, handwelted shoes and boots. No last is needed to retain the proper fit and feel if the repairman respects the original standards to which the shoe was made.
     
  6. Fred H.

    Fred H. Senior member

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    How this thread turned into a snobfest is just fubar[​IMG]
    No shit ace. It's like a bunch of threads on MC. If you happen to like non-iron shirts or black blazers or shoes from American makers, you get called out as a *small-timer* by opinionated peons who -- if you check their 40 or 50 previous posts -- haven't contributed a SINGLE thing to the forum and, on top of that, have only been dressing themselves for a year or two. You want to ambush them in their tiny little cubicles and slap them silly, dontcha?
     
  7. rossyl

    rossyl Senior member

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    No shit ace. It's like a bunch of threads on MC. If you happen to like non-iron shirts or black blazers or shoes from American makers, you get called out as a *small-timer* by opinionated peons who -- if you check their 40 or 50 previous posts -- haven't contributed a SINGLE thing to the forum and, on top of that, have only been dressing themselves for a year or two.

    You want to ambush them in their tiny little cubicles and slap them silly, dontcha?


    That's the problem with any internet forum.

    Post an image wearing a suit, you'll get people who recently joined saying the shoulders are too wide as an unfortunate standard practice.
     
  8. Bartolo

    Bartolo Senior member

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    it also screams "I don't like cracking my head on ice"

    This IS a significant issue for me here in the Boston area. It keeps me wearing my rubber-soled Ecco's, or nicer Dainite-soled shoes, in the winter. Leather soles seem really slippery on the ice we get here [​IMG]

    That said, I've not been a fan of topy, etc.
     
  9. A.L.Z.

    A.L.Z. Senior member

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    So what was the conclusion reached here about adding good quality rubber topys to the leather soles on elite shoes? Did I make a mistake rubber-topying my Church's Pembreys?


    Incidentally, at a large cathedral-like atrium that is the entrance to a place I was at today, with polished marble floors....at around 11, past the morning rush....an older gentleman walked in, not leisuredly but not running, but clearly ready to get something very seriously done.....and the sound of his leather soles resounded in the entire atrium like whiplashes to herald his arrival....

    It sure as hell sounded cool...and struck awe and admiration into rubber-soled me....
     
  10. fritzl

    fritzl Senior member

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    well, I think that Alden/AE/C&J et al say that their shoes will only take a full resole 4 or 5 times. and they probably need it every 2-3 years (?) if they are in normal rotation. so I think that's how you get to math of 10-15 years of usable lifetime

    alright, that's a shame.
     
  11. CaymanS

    CaymanS Senior member

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    I topy all of my shoes right after I buy them, without fail.

    I was in LA once wearing leather-soled shoes and it rained - very hard - unexpectedly. I took a bad spill and landed flat on my back in a puddle - suit soaked, spasms all over my back, a mess. Definitely could have been avoided if there were just a bit of rubber-like material on my soles.

    To whose who say "Who would you wear nice shoes in the rain?" - this is sound advice, if you live in desert environs.

    For the rest of us (who live in areas where rains come and go without warning), having a reputable cobbler put a thin sheet of topy on the soles will do very little to erode the aesthetic of the shoe while adding several years of wear and, most importantly, a bit of traction on sidewalks and soft rugs.
     
  12. CaymanS

    CaymanS Senior member

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    Did I make a mistake rubber-topying my Church's Pembreys?

    Well, yes, if you live and die by the groupthink mentality common to non-experts on men's forums who delight in ramming their hardheaded views down your throat without so much as giving an iota of attention to a word in edgewise.

    Otherwise, you did what I would have done. [​IMG]
     
  13. CaymanS

    CaymanS Senior member

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    Leather is a fiber mat. It has pores and when worn just a little...past the waxed grain...tends to expand in contact with moisture. As it gets wet it becomes a little softer as well. So the upshot is that leather, if not dismissed out of hand, will conform to any irregularities and will tend to grip slick surfaces better than a less porous compound.

    Rubber...topy in particular...has no pores. Has no ability to expand or get soft or grip. The texture or "tread" on the topy will work pretty well on wet surfaces that are not inherently slick. But, if nothing else, once that tread is worn down a little, it is slick against slick.


    I have seen your handwork and obviously defer to your opinion and experience because you actually are an expert.

    That said, I would simply note that my personal experience contradicts this statement entirely.

    In LA, non-topy'd shoes: worst spill of my life.

    In every other city - light rain, drizzle, light snow, name it: never slipped, never even lost balance.

    Could be that the topy my cobbler uses is striated for better grip(?) Who knows...
     
  14. makewayhomer

    makewayhomer Senior member

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    I think the disconnect is that completely smooth rubber truly is as awful as DWF says on slick surfaces. I have taken 2 gigantic spills wearing boots with that description before I gave up on them. in other shoes, I can't remember the last time I fell

    but my vibram'd soles don't look anything like the pair of smooth rubber soled shoes I have (had)
     
  15. Lear

    Lear Senior member

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    Was watching Layer Cake this evening. There's a scene about 3/4 way through. It's where they continually switch between closeup shots of two mens feet, moving through an underground car park (music). Sorry, don't know the DVD timer position.

    Anyway, Daniel Craig is wearing leather soled RMW chelsea boots, with what appears to be Topy protection. Only visible as the camera catches a rear view shot of one foot off the ground. Can't remember if he has any fight/action scenes in those boots. Would be a valid reason for fitting them onto costume though.

    You must all see the logic here:

    DC (James Bond to you) wears RMW boots
    Lear wears RMW boots

    DC uses Topy protection
    Lear uses Topy protection

    DC is a fine figure of a man
    Lear is a.... actually let's just leave it at that.

    But you get the idea. And to think I'd ever doubted myself.

    Lear
     
  16. ThatGuy

    ThatGuy Senior member

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    Wow ... you guys are precious.


    But let's be real, real men know how to walk in leather soled shoes. All this talk reminds me of my friend complaining about wearing leather soled shoes. He switched to hush puppies for the grip. Rubbish, ain't it? We all know it's about defiling your shoes in an attempt to prolong its life.

    Yes, 50 posts. Yes, dont look like I try too hard.
     
  17. blahman

    blahman Senior member

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    I thought real men don't try to cram their own opinion of what they think real men do down other people's throats. :p
     
  18. HitMan009

    HitMan009 Senior member

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    I see nothing wrong with sole guards. Any resoling that is not from the original manufacturer will most of the time feel different. I rather just replace the sole guards then to resole the shoes. I think it's better that way. I had shoes done by Mina's on Wall Street. He uses a Vibram sole guards similar to the look of Topys and not the wedge shaped threads of other Vibram sole guards shown on this forum before. For anyone who uses B. Nelson, I rather use Mina's over B. Nelson any day of the week.
     
  19. __PG__

    __PG__ Senior member

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    Hospital.

    Every once in a while, the lines blur.

    (that was a joke)


    I laughed! [​IMG]
     
  20. Fred H.

    Fred H. Senior member

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    I thought real men don't try to cram their own opinion of what they think real men do down other people's throats. :p
    The site mods need to use the global ignore option on TrollGuy. After 200 posts and no one is rising to take the bait he'll just fade back into the dark and dusty corner of the spare bedroom in his grandma's house from which he emerged.
     

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