Tie Care

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by nizzer, Mar 5, 2011.

  1. J. Cogburn

    J. Cogburn Senior member

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    I loosen the tie a bit, slip it over my head, tighten it back up so the loop is
    the same size it will be when I put it back on, and hang it back in my closet. [​IMG]


    You don't untie your tie when you take it off at night? If not, why not?
     


  2. nizzer

    nizzer Member

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    Thanks for all the responses, they have been more than helpful.
     


  3. kafziel

    kafziel Member

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    You don't untie your tie when you take it off at night? If not, why not?

    I tie the ideal knot for each tie I have - different knots depending on the tie and how I plan to wear it - and then I don't have to tie it again. I might occasionally untie one for some reason, but assuming it was tied perfectly the first time and I tie it perfectly the second time (which I do), all the creases inside the knot will still end up in exactly the same place.

    I just don't understand the idea of fanatically caring for a relatively inexpensive accessory that will eventually go out of style anyway. Shoes, yes. Watches, yes. Socks, pocket squares, and boxer shorts, no. Even if I had meticulously rolled every black-and-aqua skinny tie I had in the 90s, I still would have ended up getting rid of them.
     


  4. J. Cogburn

    J. Cogburn Senior member

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    I tie the ideal knot for each tie I have - different knots depending on the tie and how I plan to wear it - and then I don't have to tie it again. I might occasionally untie one for some reason, but assuming it was tied perfectly the first time and I tie it perfectly the second time (which I do), all the creases inside the knot will still end up in exactly the same place.

    I just don't understand the idea of fanatically caring for a relatively inexpensive accessory that will eventually go out of style anyway. Shoes, yes. Watches, yes. Socks, pocket squares, and boxer shorts, no. Even if I had meticulously rolled every black-and-aqua skinny tie I had in the 90s, I still would have ended up getting rid of them.


    Guess you buy cheap ties then. The least expensive ties I buy are Sam Hober's, which are usually just shy of $100. The Drakes, of course, are more expensive, as are the high-folds. And since I don't buy trendy ties, I don't have to worry about them going out of style.

    And don't tell me it's a waste of money to buy higher-end ties. It's not. You can really tell the difference in how it knots, how it hangs, and very often, how it looks.

    Leaving your ties tied over long periods of time will eventually break them far earlier than would be the case if you just untied the damn things. I mean, how much effort is required to tie a tie? Moreover, you might want to tie a four-in-hand for a medium point collar and a half windsor for a spread. If you leave your ties tied, they will get so wrinkled up top that you won't have that option.
     


  5. Fred49

    Fred49 Senior member

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    for spots I use Goddards the stuff is magic is very small doses
     


  6. kafziel

    kafziel Member

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    Guess you buy cheap ties then.

    No, I just don't get upset about replacing them once in a while. What's the sense of spending thousands of dollars on suits but balking at spending $100 on a new tie?


    And since I don't buy trendy ties, I don't have to worry about them going out of style.

    Don't kid yourself. Everything goes out of style eventually, whether you're on board or not.

    And don't tell me it's a waste of money to buy higher-end ties. It's not. You can really tell the difference in how it knots, how it hangs, and very often, how it looks.

    No argument there. That's why I don't whine about buying them. But I own my ties, they don't own me.

    Leaving your ties tied over long periods of time will eventually break them far earlier than would be the case if you just untied the damn things. I mean, how much effort is required to tie a tie? Moreover, you might want to tie a four-in-hand for a medium point collar and a half windsor for a spread. If you leave your ties tied, they will get so wrinkled up top that you won't have that option.

    I have never had a tie disintegrate because I left it knotted. (I suppose it's safe to say you haven't either, since you don't do it, so how would you know?) Of all the possible dangers to a tie, that is the least of its worries. And, as I said, I tie different knots for different ties that will be used in different ways. It's not as though I only have five ties to choose from. Certain ties are better for certain shirts and I give them the appropriate knot. Some ties are truly universal, so for those I might buy more than one. And, when I get tired of a particular tie I throw it away and spring for a new one. A great tie is well worth the cost.
     


  7. Harold falcon

    Harold falcon Senior member

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    I just don't understand the idea of fanatically caring for a relatively inexpensive accessory that will eventually go out of style anyway. Shoes, yes. Watches, yes. Socks, pocket squares, and boxer shorts, no. Even if I had meticulously rolled every black-and-aqua skinny tie I had in the 90s, I still would have ended up getting rid of them.

    Then you're wasteful. I treat all my ties with the same degree of care, whether it's Hermes or some vintage BB I bought at the Salvation Army.

    Buy good ties and they will not go "out of style". Buying "black-and-aqua skinny ties" is your first problem.
     


  8. idfnl

    idfnl Senior member

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    Keeping your knots tied is a big mistake. First, it eventually misshapens the line of the blade. Second, it makes really nasty wrinkles which are very hard to get rid of. Lastly, this is a bad idea because the knot is constantly exposed to skin and touch and will eventually dirty. Tying new knots helps disperse the soiling since you wont knot the same exact place twice.


    In terms of care, the advice above makes sense. Agreed, dont dry clean unless its stained.


    Personally, I roll my ties. It releases the fabric better than hanging, IMO.

    2 other pieces of advice.... always undo your knots the same way you originally tied them. Dont ever, EVER, ever do the yank until the short end comes thru. Second, keep your nail trim. Easiest way to ruin a great Marinalla is with a pull that came from a loose fingernail. This also goes for dry skin.
     


  9. idfnl

    idfnl Senior member

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    for spots I use Goddards the stuff is magic is very small doses

    http://www.goddards.com/

    ?

    What product are you talking about?
     


  10. MCH-est.1818

    MCH-est.1818 Well-Known Member

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    I hang the vast majority of my ties BUT I would recommend for KNIT TIES that you keep them rolled and stored in a drawer instead of hung--hanging them could cause them to stretch over time due to the loose weave construction. I also carefully roll-up my seasonal ties and put them in a storage box when not in use.

    I also second the "do not launder/dry clean your ties"--the chemicals are bad and doing so takes the body out of the tie--they come back flat and stiff. if you get a something on the tie just lightly clean it by dabbing the areas with a wet cloth/towel. in the case of a significant wrinkle(s), I sometimes use an iron very delicately to iron it out but that is very, very rarely.
     


  11. jimp

    jimp Active Member

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    I would love to know which Goddards product to try. I have lost many great ties over the years.
     


  12. idfnl

    idfnl Senior member

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    I hang the vast majority of my ties BUT I would recommend for KNIT TIES that you keep them rolled and stored in a drawer instead of hung--hanging them could cause them to stretch over time due to the loose weave construction. I also carefully roll-up my seasonal ties and put them in a storage box when not in use.

    I also second the "do not launder/dry clean your ties"--the chemicals are bad and doing so takes the body out of the tie--they come back flat and stiff. if you get a something on the tie just lightly clean it by dabbing the areas with a wet cloth/towel. in the case of a significant wrinkle(s), I sometimes use an iron very delicately to iron it out but that is very, very rarely.


    Roll silk knits very loosely though, otherwise the spine of the tie on the back will stretch and indentation on the front and your knit will look like it has a racing stripe on the front of it.
     


  13. kafziel

    kafziel Member

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    Then you're wasteful.

    As are we all. Otherwise we'd go around wearing sackcloth and sandals. No matter what excuse we may have for it, spending $200 on a tie is wasteful. For the price of a couple of ties, you could support a child in Africa for a year. So if you're on Style Forum, you don't care all that much about starving children in Africa. Neither do I.


    Buy good ties and they will not go "out of style". Buying "black-and-aqua skinny ties" is your first problem.

    There's no such thing as a timeless article of clothing. I'm sure plenty of men took special care of their straw boaters, but eventually it was time to get rid of them. The silk ties you claim are so timeless were seen by many as un-American during World War II, when silk was needed for the war effort. What you think is timeless now only seems that way because it hasn't gone out of style yet.

    Ties came into style quickly, and they can go out just as fast. I have no idea what the future holds, and I don't live my life as though a scrap of cloth is so precious it must be maintained at all costs. I like nice things, and I buy them when I want them. One thing I know for sure is that nobody ever gets to his death bed wishing he had spent more time caring for his neckties.
     


  14. Cant kill da Rooster

    Cant kill da Rooster Senior member

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    Nizzer,
    Luxury Ties should be hung not rolled to prevent damage to tips. From time to time change the tie's position on the hanger.


    If ties are carefully rolled and stored, does this really apply? I prefer not to hang mine.
     


  15. idfnl

    idfnl Senior member

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    If ties are carefully rolled and stored, does this really apply? I prefer not to hang mine.

    SH is a very experienced maker, so I take his advice seriously. I roll mine and keep them sideways. I've never seen any damage.
     


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