This is for Tokyo Slim (but not the iPod part):

Discussion in 'Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto' started by imageWIS, Mar 23, 2006.

  1. imageWIS

    imageWIS Senior member

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  2. SGladwell

    SGladwell Senior member

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    What's wrong with just driving. Note that this demo car has a slushbox. That's VW's way of telling people its newfangled thingy is for lazy idiots.
     


  3. imageWIS

    imageWIS Senior member

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    I like the iPod integration, the rest is way too much and too complex to do while driving.

    Jon.
     


  4. briancl

    briancl Senior member

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    Note that this demo car has a slushbox. That's VW's way of telling people its newfangled thingy is for lazy idiots.

    I assume he is an american somewhere in the united states. what else could you expect?
     


  5. imageWIS

    imageWIS Senior member

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    I resent the slushbox stereotype. I was going to get my A4 with a 6-speed, but there were several deterrents that prevented me. First off, I don't like the fact the Audi gauge cluster is reverse than what is found in MB / BMW. The speedometer is on the right and the RPM gauge is on the left, and it throws me off, since I am used to having it laid out the other way around. Secondly: the Audi 6-speed seemed a bit choppy and I have heard that some people have problems with the version that comes in the B7 A4. Lastly: the traffic in SoFLA is getting worse and worse every year and rush hour is not a lot of fun with a manual tranny.

    Jon.
     


  6. A Y

    A Y Senior member

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    While the slushbox stereotype is unjustifiably harsh, I don't understand why traffic justifies a slushbox. I've been on the 405 freeway in LA in terrible stop-and-go traffic (30 minutes to go a couple of miles), which is also uphill in parts, and the manual hasn't been a problem. For long term reliability, manuals will last longer, and are easier to fix and maintain than slushboxes which rely on magic voodoo in specific lubrication fluids to make sure everything's working correctly. BTW, I don't understand the role of the gauge cluster layout in your transmission choice: do you watch the RPMs when you shift?

    Also, on a personal preference level, I can't deal with slushboxes not rev-matching for downshifts, and the lazy revving sounds they draw from the engine.

    --Ande
     


  7. Tokyo Slim

    Tokyo Slim In Time Out

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    I Just saw this, I think I have become desensitized to seeing my own name on here with the proliferation of "Slim Jeans" and "Slim fit" threads. I have nothing against iPod integration in a car, as long as I have the choice not to buy it.
     


  8. faustian bargain

    faustian bargain Senior member

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    i think one should be able to steer one's car with the little iPod wheel-button thingy.
     


  9. imageWIS

    imageWIS Senior member

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    While the slushbox stereotype is unjustifiably harsh, I don't understand why traffic justifies a slushbox. I've been on the 405 freeway in LA in terrible stop-and-go traffic (30 minutes to go a couple of miles), which is also uphill in parts, and the manual hasn't been a problem. For long term reliability, manuals will last longer, and are easier to fix and maintain than slushboxes which rely on magic voodoo in specific lubrication fluids to make sure everything's working correctly. BTW, I don't understand the role of the gauge cluster layout in your transmission choice: do you watch the RPMs when you shift?

    Also, on a personal preference level, I can't deal with slushboxes not rev-matching for downshifts, and the lazy revving sounds they draw from the engine.

    --Ande


    I've been in traffic at times and it felt like my left leg was going to fall off. Especially hour long stop and go traffic in Miami, which never saw the car get past 2nd gear. Auto transmissions make things easier and less tiresome. I could care less about the long term reliability; since I will only have my car while it is under warranty (costs associated with maintaining German cars outside of warranty are insanely high).

    Regarding match rev-downshifts, my car has a CVT transmission which allows me to put the car in "˜Sport' mode, thus the car downshifts quickly, and even skips gears while downshifting, and is always, always in "˜rev-mode' simply touching the accelerator throws you past 4000 rpms, flooring it moves you right at redline.

    And yes, oftentimes when I had my 5-speed I would look at the rev counter. Mind you, not the speedo, but the rev counter. My speed was irrelevant, what mattered was the precision of my shifts [​IMG] . If you look at Porsches / Ferrari's gauge cluster, you can see that the rev counter is prominently in the middle, there is a reason for that.

    Jon.
     


  10. Oddly Familiar

    Oddly Familiar Senior member

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    I don't understand the iron thing.
     


  11. SGladwell

    SGladwell Senior member

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    I hate the "boo hoo, we have traffic" so called argument. Do you think the rest of the world has no traffic? Yet outside of America (and I think Japan) the world's drivers almost unanimously manage to have left legs that are in reasonable health. That is to say, their left legs are not so pathetically atrophied that they find depressing a (hydraulically assisted, mind) pedal a few times a minute to be such an arduous burden as to require alleviation through a mechanical contraption that adds mass, saps engine power, and degrades fuel economy.

    If one has lost use of his/her left leg (because of the Iraq disaster or whatever) then there's no shame in buying a slushbox. Otherwise, there's no virtue in advertising one's lack of hand-eye coördination or care for driving.

    Of course, if one does not care to drive something fun to drive at near-legal speeds instead of posing in something that "feels the same at 30mph and 100mph," then any appeal to driving pleasure or connectedness is lost, anyway.
     


  12. briancl

    briancl Senior member

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    automatic gearboxes are really the last step towards complete isolation between driver and road. there are a lot of people (primarily in the united states, which is relatively free of traffic compared to say... london or paris or any major EU city) that want this isolation, however. they are too busy doing other things while driving, such as conducting business or talking to their friends or daydreaming about being rich, who knows what else.. (now they are watching movies or playing playstation while driving ! ) i've never owned anything but manual and learned to drive on a manual... i can't picture myself owning anything else...

    i also travel a decent amount for work, and its funny how differently i drive when im on the road. when im in a rental car.. i can't wait to get out of it. i hate every moment. i get road rage. i cant stand the way the car shifts itself.. since its always at the wrong time (either up or down). the throttle+brake does not give me nearly enough control over my acceleration or deceleration. i need manual gear selection.

    that said, when im home, i enjoy every minute of driving. even sitting in traffic is fun. i dont mean to imply that having a manual makes driving a completely different experience, but my point is more that being in my preferred car makes does make for a completely different driving experience vs being in any rental.. which are actually a wide range of vehicles (from taurus to mustang to F150 to minivan to celica to kia to murano to large SUV.. best regular rental car i've had: mazda6)
     


  13. imageWIS

    imageWIS Senior member

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    I hate the "boo hoo, we have traffic" so called argument. Do you think the rest of the world has no traffic? Yet outside of America (and I think Japan) the world's drivers almost unanimously manage to have left legs that are in reasonable health. That is to say, their left legs are not so pathetically atrophied that they find depressing a (hydraulically assisted, mind) pedal a few times a minute to be such an arduous burden as to require alleviation through a mechanical contraption that adds mass, saps engine power, and degrades fuel economy. If one has lost use of his/her left leg (because of the Iraq disaster or whatever) then there's no shame in buying a slushbox. Otherwise, there's no virtue in advertising one's lack of hand-eye coördination or care for driving. Of course, if one does not care to drive something fun to drive at near-legal speeds instead of posing in something that "feels the same at 30mph and 100mph," then any appeal to driving pleasure or connectedness is lost, anyway.
    Dude...my car is built in a way that you really have no idea when you are cruising at 100 mph. My drive pleasure is not really derived from speed, rather by moving in and out of traffic past those who could not even weave in and out of traffic without crashing into a tree (or another car). If I wanted a car only for driving pleasure, I would have bought a Lotus Elise, however I bought a car for its ‘overall’ use, not just for sheer driving pleasure. Because lets face it, sheer driving pleasure is not really comfortable, is it? Of course the rest of the world has traffic! (Hell, I’m from Bs As, do you have any idea how bad the traffic is?) However, after a long day (8 hours at work + 5 hours at school, I like the fact that there is at least one task I don’t have to do, especially if I am stuck in traffic… Jon.
     


  14. imageWIS

    imageWIS Senior member

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    automatic gearboxes are really the last step towards complete isolation between driver and road. there are a lot of people (primarily in the united states, which is relatively free of traffic compared to say... london or paris or any major EU city) that want this isolation, however. they are too busy doing other things while driving, such as conducting business or talking to their friends or daydreaming about being rich, who knows what else.. (now they are watching movies or playing playstation while driving ! ) i've never owned anything but manual and learned to drive on a manual... i can't picture myself owning anything else...

    i also travel a decent amount for work, and its funny how differently i drive when im on the road. when im in a rental car.. i can't wait to get out of it. i hate every moment. i get road rage. i cant stand the way the car shifts itself.. since its always at the wrong time (either up or down). the throttle+brake does not give me nearly enough control over my acceleration or deceleration. i need manual gear selection.

    that said, when im home, i enjoy every minute of driving. even sitting in traffic is fun. i dont mean to imply that having a manual makes driving a completely different experience, but my point is more that being in my preferred car makes does make for a completely different driving experience vs being in any rental.. which are actually a wide range of vehicles (from taurus to mustang to F150 to minivan to celica to kia to murano to large SUV.. best regular rental car i've had: mazda6)


    Well, you have to learn to appreciate everything...

    What car do you own? Because if you are comparing a Kia or a Ford to even a half decent car (Honda), then your comparison is severely flawed.

    Jon.
     


  15. briancl

    briancl Senior member

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    Well, you have to learn to appreciate everything...

    What car do you own? Because if you are comparing a Kia or a Ford to even a half decent car (Honda), then your comparison is severely flawed.

    Jon.


    i dont get how my comparison is flawed. the rental cars i drive are what make up at least 50% of whats on the road (i made that up, but its a best guesstimate). i will be more specific... i get camry's and taurus's and f150's and explorer's and grand prix's. there.. that alone has got to be a third of all cars on the road... not to mention all the other misc cars/trucks/suv's ive had as rentals. my comparison is fine.. as the sample is quite varied and covers a large portion of the american driving population.

    as to your question.. i own and daily drive a 2005 subaru sti. i've done medium level suspension mods (replace lots of rubber bushings, stiffer springs, stiffer sway bars, billet aluminum strut top mounts, etc) which greatly improve the handling (i.e. turn-in and neutrality on the race track, as well as progressive breakaway and predictability) and ride quality (i.e., this car shouldn't be soft. stock, i felt the car oscillated at speed far too much. now its actually more comfortable, even if that sounds counterintuitive).
     


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