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Things you just don't get

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by tiecollector, Jul 3, 2009.

  1. MrG

    MrG Senior member

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    It's true about the Creed. :embar:

    Every decade since The Who has had its angst, but I never got the impression that it was especially pervasive in the 80s. I'm just old enough to remember 80s musical culture, though it certainly wasn't "mine," and angst isn't something that stands out to me. Still, I admit that you'd know better than me.

    I think for bands like RHCP, you have to consider where the zenith of their importance happened, and that was clearly the 90s for them. There are a lot of bands that started in the 80s but would be considered 90s bands. Soundgarden had an 80s release, too. Even Nirvana had an album in the 80s. Essentially, all of grunge, which was the quintessential 90s sound, at least for the first half, started in the 80s. The fact that they straddle decades is really just a consequence of the fact that all of these bands formed and put out albums a few years before they got super famous, so they had already done some work before the 90s started. Still, they basically formed 90s pop culture, so, despite many of them existing in the 80s, I think the argument is pretty strong that they're all 90s bands.*

    Then you have all the grunge precursor bands like Mother Love Bone and Green River, which were all late 80s but essentially got the ball rolling on the early-90s sound.

    *I know RHCP isn't grunge, but I think they're a fundamental part of the 90s sound, despite forming in the 80s. Grunge bands were just the easiest example I could come up with that straddled decades while really being fundamentally 90s.
     
    Last edited: Nov 21, 2013
  2. Piobaire

    Piobaire Senior member

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    He still takes himself too seriously.

    At his best his lyrics, particularly coupled with the music, are really evocative for me. I enjoy how he's smart enough to get things going on multiple levels (think 46 and 2) and they tackle some heavy things like child sexual abuse, etc.

    Dana Carey is also a great drummer and Jones and Chancellor create a sound that appeals to me.
     
  3. gomestar

    gomestar Senior member

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    i've liked some Tool, but all the weird people in high school gravitated towards them. "Carey employes some really weird time signatures, it's so mathematical it's kind of heroic" type of people, even though they were dumb as fuck and probably though "derivative" was just a song name. Same thing applied with all of the weird Tool logos.
     
    Last edited: Nov 21, 2013
  4. Piobaire

    Piobaire Senior member

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    As to the 80s angst I'll drop a few songs off the top of my head:

    1) Future's So Bright I Gotta Wear Shades = nuclear holocaust
    2) 99 Red Love Ballons = nuclear holocaust
    3) Distant Early Warning = nuclear holocaust
    4) Party At Ground Zero = nuclear holocaust
    5) Atomic = nuclear holocaust
    6) 2 Minutes to Midnight = nuclear holocaust
    7) Every Day is Like Sunday = nuclear holocaust
    8) The Russians = please don't let nuclear holocaust happen Mr. Raygun

    You get the idea. I could go on like about The Dead Kennedys and general nihilism of punk that carried on into the 80s.

     
    Last edited: Nov 21, 2013
  5. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I'm going to see a 90's band tonight. With some jerk-off.
     
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  6. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    99 luft balloons, you idiot.
     
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  7. ethanm

    ethanm Senior member

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    The Gin Blossoms played in Princeton a few years ago. It was the first time I had ever heard of them.
     
  8. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I hope Gin Blossom fans like suits and ties more than Blink 182 fans did.
     
  9. gomestar

    gomestar Senior member

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    i'm not wearing a suit. OCBD, solid blue tie, Howard Yount scottish cashmere sweater, Howard Yount plaid/houndstooth flannel trousers, RL cordovan loafers.


    I'll fit right in.
     
  10. MrG

    MrG Senior member

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    I definitely see nihilism here, (and I think you could even argue that the 80s hair metal bands who sang about nothing but chicks and partying had their own brand of nihilism), but I disagree that it's the same as the pervasive angst that ran through the 90s. I mean, think about it: The decade started with Kurt Cobain being all angsty about junk and his tummy, then halfway through Kurt offs himself, and it closes with Jonathan Davis wailing about the horrible stuff that happened to him when he was a kid. Even when the music advanced from grunge to nu metal, it kept the angst. In the intervening years, we had countless alt rock bands complaining about pretty much everything while nestled in their oversized sweaters.

    So, I agree that the 80s beat the 90s in nihilism, and there are no doubt a lot of examples of angst in the 80s, as well. However, in terms of sheer angst ubiquity, I don't think any decade has ever come close to the 90s.
     
  11. Piobaire

    Piobaire Senior member

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    I agree here and maybe didn't formulate what I was saying clearly. I think those musicians around my age that fueled the 90s scene got that angst due to the popular culture we grew up in during the 80s.
     
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  12. MrG

    MrG Senior member

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    Okay, yeah, then we're on the same page.
     
  13. MrG

    MrG Senior member

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    Also, this thread has inspired me to go on quite the 90s-music binge at work.

    :slayer:
     
  14. kashmir

    kashmir Senior member

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    linkin park is one of few bands that I had truly and inexplicably left behind. just couldnt connect and enjoy them at any level now. not even nostalgia. dunno why... i have had those moments when i listened to a lot of zep, then no zep, and then zep again, on and on in a cycle. same with who, stones, etc, even u2... but not linkin park. many of my friends still listen to them after junior high, up until their 20s, and they even manage to pull the "i liked the old linkin park better" shit
     
  15. MrG

    MrG Senior member

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    Maybe because you no longer like overproduced, derivative dreck?
     
  16. kashmir

    kashmir Senior member

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    and then yeah, we got into the topic of nu metal. peculiar how this genre shoots to immense popularity and then just went poof. a truly 90s phenomenon along with grunge i suppose? did linkin distil ratm or were there earlier nu metal i didnt know about? also, limp bizkit. so many fans here, smh
     
  17. gomestar

    gomestar Senior member

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    nu metal was great for letting a whole lot of teens think they were great guitar players.
     
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  18. MrG

    MrG Senior member

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    Linkin Park was a mix of all the worst parts of nu metal. I don't think it's accurate to say they ripped off RATM directly, more like ripped off all the early bands that mixed hip hop and metal (RATM, KoRn, Limp Bizkit, etc.).

    For the record, nu metal didn't really shoot to popularity. It grew underground for a number of years before really taking off. This is particularly true for early bands like KoRn and Limp Bizkit, whose major-label debuts were gracing the CD players in some of our cars for years before nu metal exploded. Believe it or not, there was a time when LB was a pretty innovative band, long before Fred Durst turned into a bloated douche.

    It did fall on its face at some point, however, but I don't think that's unique. The same thing happened to most genres. They die quickly when they're overrun by derivative rip-off bands that were never as good as the bands they're emulating in the first place (*cough* Linkin Park *cough*).
     
    Last edited: Nov 21, 2013
  19. ethanm

    ethanm Senior member

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    Are you implying Korn was good?
     
  20. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    A lot of those guitarists actually did some interesting stuff though. Wes Borland used a lot of weird chords. Made up his own and such. I remember geeking out on that stuff for a while.
     

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