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Things you just don't get

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by tiecollector, Jul 3, 2009.

  1. LawrenceMD

    LawrenceMD Senior member

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    [​IMG]

    separate hot and cold faucets in a sink/bathtub. :fu:
     
  2. otc

    otc Senior member

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    I could understand it in a bathtub (well not really understand, but could deal with)

    But I don't get it when they use them in sinks.
     
  3. Gibonius

    Gibonius Senior member

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    Seems like you'd get scaldingly hot water out of the hot tap.
     
  4. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Or 32.1 degree water. Take your pick.
     
  5. Piobaire

    Piobaire Senior member

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    I can remember a bathroom sink having a mixed faucet was pretty impressive to me. All the old houses I grew up in had the separate faucets.
     
  6. Pennglock

    Pennglock Senior member

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    I have a couple of theories about the 2-faucet thing. Neither of which apply to modern times.

    1. When indoor plumbing first came along people were not used to the concept of running water/wasting water. They filled a basing for their toilet needs, and the faucets arent a hinderance to that.

    That still wouldnt explain they chose to install 2 peice of hardware. So here's a better guess:

    2. Hot water heaters in those days didnt use a pump. Ive seen shots of turn-of-the-century houses where the water heater was in the attic and operated by gravity. This would produce much less pressure than the main water line, so a convenient way to get around balancing that pressure to get enough hot water is 2 faucets.

    Any plumbers on board have a real explanation?
     
  7. Harold falcon

    Harold falcon Senior member

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    I am an amateur plumber but I believe this explanation is accurate. Many times in ye oldern days the cold and the hot water had different pressure. It stuck around because that's what many people's old sinks had installed so you couldn't replace just the faucet you would have to replace the whole sink.

    Also we had one of these in the house I lived in during elementary school.

    [​IMG]
     
    1 person likes this.
  8. Fang66

    Fang66 Senior member

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    32.1 degrees, just under body temp.
     
  9. L'Incandescent

    L'Incandescent Senior member

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    I am very happy it's not my body that is 32.1 degrees. Brrrr.
     
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2012
  10. Gibonius

    Gibonius Senior member

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    Neat. I learned something today!
     
  11. wootx

    wootx Senior member

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  12. LawrenceMD

    LawrenceMD Senior member

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    32.1ºC as a body temp? you're well into hypothermia and probably already calculating time of death if a pathologist/detective/CSI guy.
     
  13. Goldy

    Goldy Well-Known Member

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    32.1 C = 89.78 F
     
  14. Claghorn

    Claghorn Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Damn you metric system, why must you make so much sense?!
     
  15. otc

    otc Senior member

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    But most hot water heaters now still don't use a pump right? It's just water pressure from the input pushing the hot water out?

    I've certainly never heard a pump kick in.
     
  16. Pennglock

    Pennglock Senior member

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    You're definitely right now that I think about it, they utilize line pressure to get the water to your faucet. Heated water rises to the top of the tank, pushed out by the flow from the bottom of the tank.
     
  17. Harold falcon

    Harold falcon Senior member

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    In most residences and small apartment buildings nowadays, yes.
     
  18. LawrenceMD

    LawrenceMD Senior member

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    body temperature is 98.6ºF.... if I remember right 35ºC and below is hypothermia for body temperature... 32.1ºC is well below that. homeostasis requires a very thin range of temperatures to be in a functioning state.... so if your body temperature is 89.78ºF... that probably means you're already in a deeeeeep state of hypothermia... or worse a police officer/pathologist/ect is calculating your time of death.
     
    Last edited: Jan 1, 2013
  19. otc

    otc Senior member

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    Why don't more places use on-demand hot water?

    I'm at home with my parents now and I can run out the hot water in a decent shower. It won't actually run out without a really long shower, but it always starts to fade as cold water replaces hot in the tank and I have to keep turning the cold water knob down to keep the shower the right temperature...is this normal? It did it with our old hot water heater as well as the new one they installed in maybe 2002. We've got pretty high water pressure and a lot of flow from the showerhead, but it still seems like it gets cold really fast.

    I've been living in apartments with centralized hot water since 05 (most of chicago doesn't have metered water so they don't bother with anything besides central plumbing in old buildings)...so my hot water is always scalding-hot and lasts literally forever.

    Certainly wouldn't want to take a long shower with a girl in a place with a water heater that runs out that fast...
     
  20. Harold falcon

    Harold falcon Senior member

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    I replaced my hot water heater when it failed a few years ago with instant on. Just know that instant on is often more expensive than a heater (at least for initial purchase and installation but not over time) and for those with water heaters still working there's little incentive to go out and drop a grand to replace it.

    And to be clear, I replaced the heater myself. Because I'm a manly man.
     

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