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Spehsmonkey

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mostly same same, traveling with empty suitcases to accommodate rug souvenirs :D

3613A15B-18A3-44C8-B337-31D4151D8E0D.jpeg


Monitaly - Inis Meain - Kapital - Needles
 

Reginald Bartholomew

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It's actually pretty cool that Spotify is letting kids discover 50-year-old music, and that they like it. When I was a kid that would have meant stuff from the 1930s...

Cool is one way to look at it. Another is that we are at the end of the dynamic phase of cultural production for this configuration of human society, that nothing truly new will ever arise again, and that we are doomed to repeat the past endlessly until we are swallowed by rising oceans or engulfed in flames.
 

d4nimal

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Cool is one way to look at it. Another is that we are at the end of the dynamic phase of cultural production for this configuration of human society, that nothing truly new will ever arise again, and that we are doomed to repeat the past endlessly until we are swallowed by rising oceans or engulfed in flames.
You must be fun at parties.
 

Fuuma

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Cool is one way to look at it. Another is that we are at the end of the dynamic phase of cultural production for this configuration of human society, that nothing truly new will ever arise again, and that we are doomed to repeat the past endlessly until we are swallowed by rising oceans or engulfed in flames.
This post inspired me to contribute a few passages from Retromania by Simon Reynolds. I've selected them from my reading notes and I wasn't necessarily entirely focusing on that topic when reading the book so if you want to go back to the source you'll get plenty more.


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If you're familiar with Mark Fisher he also writes about this (Reynolds and him were friends):

“The slow cancellation of the future has been accompanied by a deflation of expectations. There can be few who believe that in the coming year a record as great as, say, the Stooges’ Funhouse or Sly Stone’s There’s A Riot Goin’ On will be released. Still less do we expect the kind of ruptures brought about by The Beatles or disco. The feeling of belatedness, of living after the gold rush, is as omnipresent as it is disavowed. Compare the fallow terrain of the current moment with the fecundity of previous periods and you will quickly be accused of ‘nostalgia’. But the reliance of current artists on styles that were established long ago suggests that the current moment is in the grip of a formal nostalgia, of which more shortly.

It is not that nothing happened in the period when the slow cancellation of the future set in. On the contrary, those thirty years has been a time of massive, traumatic change. In the UK, the election of Margaret Thatcher had brought to an end the uneasy compromises of the so-called postwar social consensus. Thatcher’s neoliberal programme in politics was reinforced by a transnational restructuring of the capitalist economy. The shift into so-called Post-Fordism – with globalization, ubiquitous computerization and the casualisation of labour – resulted in a complete transformation in the way that work and leisure were organised. In the last ten to fifteen years, meanwhile, the internet and mobile telecommunications technology have altered the texture of everyday experience beyond all recognition. Yet, perhaps because of all this, there’s an increasing sense that culture has lost the ability to grasp and articulate the present. Or it could be that, in one very important sense, there is no present to grasp and articulate anymore.”

― Mark Fisher, Ghosts of My Life: Writings on Depression, Hauntology and Lost Futures
 
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hendrix

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The other day my 13 YO daughter asked me if I'd ever heard "Paranoid" by some band called Black Sabbath...

It's actually pretty cool that Spotify is letting kids discover 50-year-old music, and that they like it. When I was a kid that would have meant stuff from the 1930s...
Cool is one way to look at it. Another is that we are at the end of the dynamic phase of cultural production for this configuration of human society, that nothing truly new will ever arise again, and that we are doomed to repeat the past endlessly until we are swallowed by rising oceans or engulfed in flames.
If you listen to 50 year old music on spotify from all around the world it's hard to not come to the conclusion that Turkey and Lebanon were basically culturally superior to anything ever achieved anywhere else.
 

upsett1_spaghett1

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How did you size on the IH? Was looking at that shirt, and the measurement seemed pretty small (especially in the shoulder) but none of the stores local to me have it in stock to try out :(
I went up 1 size from normal. I’m normally an XL, so I went XXL. The sleeves were quite long on me though so I had them shortened a bit
 

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